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eBook The Black Prism (Lightbringer) epub

by Brent Weeks

eBook The Black Prism (Lightbringer) epub
  • ISBN: 0316068136
  • Author: Brent Weeks
  • Genre: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Fantasy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orbit; Reprint edition (September 1, 2011)
  • ePUB size: 1616 kb
  • FB2 size 1719 kb
  • Formats lit lrf docx azw


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The Black Prism, the first book in Lightbringer series by Brent Weeks, was one of my first forays into an adult . The Black Prism ends on a cliffhanger that sets up the next book quite well. I definitely look forward to returning to the colorful (so clever) world that Brent Weeks has created.

The Black Prism, the first book in Lightbringer series by Brent Weeks, was one of my first forays into an adult high-fantasy novel. An incredibly original and entertaining start to a memorable high fantasy series.

The Black Prism (Lightbringer is a Fantasy novel by Brent Weeks. Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace

The Black Prism (Lightbringer is a Fantasy novel by Brent Weeks. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace. Yet Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live. When Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he's willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.

The Lightbringer Series. From the author of the New York Times Bestselling Night Angel Trilogy comes an action-packed tale of magic and adventur. avin Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world.

The first book in his Lightbringer Series, The Black Prism, was released in 2010. It was originally intended to be a trilogy, but his publishers announced in 2012 (to coincide with the release of book 2, The Blinding Knife) that it would span four books, the third of which, The Broken Eye, was released in August 2014.

Books by Brent Weeks. The night angel trilogy. Except as permitted under the . 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017.

July 2013 : USA Paperback

Books related to The Black Prism: Lightbringer: Book One. Skip this list.

Books related to The Black Prism: Lightbringer: Book One.

Lightbringer"The Black Prism""The Blinding Knife""The Broken Eye""The Blood Mirror"""""For more from Brent . Brent Weeks is so good it's starting to tick me of. - Peter V. Brett, New York Times bestselling author of The Desert Spear.

Lightbringer"The Black Prism""The Blinding Knife""The Broken Eye""The Blood Mirror"""""For more from Brent Weeks, check out: Night Angel"The Way of Shadows""Shadow's Edge""Beyond the Shadows" "Night Angel: The Complete Trilogy" (omnibus)"Perfect Shadow: A Night Angel Novella ("e-only)"The Way of Shadows: The Graphic Novel".

Gavin Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace. But Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live: Five years to achieve five impossible goals. But when Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he's willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.
Comments: (7)
Fearlessrunner
As a voracious reader of fantasy, I've read just about every series out there. The Sword of Truth series, the Kingkiller Chronicles, the Codex Alera series, and The Stormlight Archive just to name a few. What usually bothers me is is just how straightforward the story arch can be. The good guy is miraculously good, discovers incredible powers, fights against bad guy (who is nothing but evil), and succeeds at the very last moment. Sometimes characters are intended to seem intelligent yet they succeed almost purely on luck. In some series the plot will be varied and fascinating, but the writing style will be so verbose you find yourself sloggin through pages and pages to get to the next big thing. Then the story becomes an excercise in waiting for something you know is going to happen.

Brent Weeks' writing style, however, is none of that.

To me the most interesting thing about Brent Weeks is not the twisting and turning of the plot. It's the careful attention he gives to the pacing. He'll cut away from a certain character, leaving you desperately wondering what happens next, but then move into something else completely fascinating and new. You'll forget for a moment how desperate you are to see the next big event. Instead the new perspective is always a perfect compliment, enhancing clarity and furthering the plot in ways that the main story arch could never provide. Even if you do get bored, it wont be for long. There's always something crucial to be seen or learned just a few pages away.

If you like complex world-building that's beautifully creative and easy to understand...
If you like a fast-paced storyline yet appreciate character development...
If you like to see evil and good and everything in between all mixed together...
If you like characters who act as intelligently or stupidly as their personality demands...
If you like social commentary through a diverse cast who each believe in their own principles...
If you like a plot that moves forward by more than the characters' need to not die or not let the bad guy win...
If you like a story that has no clear endgame...
If you like good writing that doesn't bog the story down by being overly styled or descriptive...

This is the series for you.
mr.Mine
I've restarted this review several times, each time trying to qualify my feelings toward the book and each time finding more reasons to actually like it.

Overall, I came away from it feeling "meh". It was typical Brent Weeks' writing style, which I absolutely love, but there were many parts of the story that were a total slog to get through. Kip's character was pretty annoying, and I wanted Karris to be so much more. I'm giving my judgment of annoyance for the Prism's character a pass for now because I think there is a lot more depth to come in the following books.
The color analogies really bothered me, too, but I guess you have to define your basis for the magical realm somewhere, so now we have Prism, Spectrum, Chromeria, the White, etc. Okay, fine.
I also felt let down by Gavin Guile because it left me with more confusion over his conflicting character rather than mystery.

I did like the portrayal of the Chromeria as being corrupt. The Freeing left me feeling very uneasy and almost on the side of the rebels fighting for the wights.
I also really liked Liv's character because I felt like she was probably the most realistic, being from a poor background and having to face the corruption and blackmail of more powerful people.

All in all, it took me a long time to come around to the idea of liking this story. There were definitely parts I couldn't put it down, but the huge chunk of the book that was the battle was a drag.

I think I will read the second book now that I've had a chance to analyze how I felt about the first, but altogether I wouldn't call this my favorite - especially having read the Night Angel trilogy first which is by far one of my favorite series ever.
Gamba
LOVED IT. Lots of plot twists, amazing character depth, creative worldbuilding, plot crawled a tiny bit at first.

SUMMARY: There is almost too much going on to summarize since the plot is deep and convoluted. Gavin is the Prism -- the most powerful guy in the Chromeria -- notified that he has a 15-year-old son who was evidently conceived at a time the Prism was engaged to gorgeous Karris. The engagement was broken off following a war between Gavin and his younger brother Dazen, both similarly powerful in creating magic from every color in the spectrum.

Present day, Karris has grown into a dangerous member of the elite Blackguard, tasked with guarding the Prism's life. The newly-found son is Kip, a smart, mouthy, chunky misfit growing into powerful magic use. Making all their lives and efforts complicated is Gavin's father, Andross -- a conniving, manipulative, powerful leader of the Chromeria who lives to twist and interfere, especially in Gavin's life.

In this colorful world, a rebellion is brewing against the Chromeria. It's arising in Kip's home, the most downtrodden of the Seven Satrapies of the Chromeria, and manifesting in the person of a self-elevated and nucking futs King and his mysterious advisor.

PROS: Loved the world-building. It took me awhile to figure out the whole magic-by-color-spectrum thing, but that made it even a little more cool. Even better were the characters, who were well developed and so multidimensional I found myself talking out loud to them when they did something interesting, evil or stupid. The plot was layers upon layers of intrigue with some twists that just spun me around.

CONS: It was a teeny bit ploddy in the first few chapters for some reason and I'm not even sure why. There was action right away but maybe I was having trouble adjusting to writing style or something. He gets a little too detailed sometimes, but his dialogue was great.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. I bought the first three books and almost didn't stop reading until they were done - alternating between Audible and Kindle. (The first Audible reader was mediocre, but reader on books 2-3 was better). My only complaint on the whole series is that I thought this was a TRILOGY, damn it and it turned into a four book series. It's February 2015 and now I have to wait for the (hopefully) last book to come out and it's killing me.
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