» » The Mirror of Worlds: The Second Volume of 'The Crown of the Isles' (Lord of the Isles)

eBook The Mirror of Worlds: The Second Volume of 'The Crown of the Isles' (Lord of the Isles) epub

by David Drake

eBook The Mirror of Worlds: The Second Volume of 'The Crown of the Isles' (Lord of the Isles) epub
  • ISBN: 076535117X
  • Author: David Drake
  • Genre: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Fantasy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy; First edition (November 4, 2008)
  • ePUB size: 1894 kb
  • FB2 size 1436 kb
  • Formats lit azw doc lrf


The Mirror of Worlds book. The powers of magic in the Isles have flooded to a thousand-year peak, and even local magicians can perform powerful spells normally beyond their control.

The Mirror of Worlds book. The Mirror of the Worlds is the second in David Drake's Crown. Fantastic forces from all angles threaten, trying to keep Garric and his companions apart to thwart the reunification of the Isles. Now the world itself has suffered a magical upheaval. The ocean has receded and the Isles have become the higher ground of a newly formed continent.

Book 8 of 9 in the Lord of the Isles Series. I've loved the Lord of Isles books since they were first released and have purchased and read each book as it came out in hard back

Book 8 of 9 in the Lord of the Isles Series. Ships from and sold by West Coast Bookseller. I've loved the Lord of Isles books since they were first released and have purchased and read each book as it came out in hard back. The last book (first in the ending triology) greatly disapointed me and I was hesitant to pick this one up but decided to give Drake another chance.

The Mirror of the Worlds is the second in the Crown of the Isles trilogy, which will conclude the epic Lord of the Isles series.

Lord of the Isles/Crown of the Isles" is the fifth major series of David Drake's that I've read in the last twenty years. His literary integrity and appreciation of integrity his characters show has been a comfort to me in hard times in every ocean on the globe.

Tom Doherty Associates. It did nothing to stand out from other volumes of the series, either good or bad. I'm a little sad that the series is almost over, but not very. I saw nothing in this book to change that assessment. Recommendation: If you've gotten this far in the series, you'll find nothing to surprise you.

The Lord of the Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Triath nan Eilean or Rìgh Innse Gall) is a title of Scottish nobility with historical roots that go back beyond the Kingdom of Scotland. It emerged from a series of hybrid Viking/Gaelic rulers of the west coast and islands of Scotland in the Middle Ages, who wielded sea-power with fleets of galleys (birlinns).

The Mirror of Worlds ( Crown of the Isles - 2 ) David Drake David Drake . The Mirror of Worlds. He could be Lord Cashel if he'd wanted, but the title meant no more to him than it would've to Ilna. Ilna's lips were as hard as knife edges.

The Mirror of Worlds ( Crown of the Isles - 2 ) David Drake David Drake The Mirror of Worlds Chapter 1 Ilna looked down the valley to the gray limestone temple and th. At one time she'd have said she didn't want anything beyond what her skill at weaving brought her.

The Mirror of Worlds followed them on an overland journey to the small kingdoms of the Isles to confirm Garric's . David Drake (born 1945) sold his first story (a fantasy) at age 20. His undergraduate majors at the University of Iowa were history (with honors) and Latin (BA, 1967).

The Mirror of Worlds followed them on an overland journey to the small kingdoms of the Isles to confirm Garric's succession and subdue, if necessary, any who refused to pledge fealty. In The Gods Return, the Isles have been more or less unified under Garric's rule, but the Change that created the continent, has removed the old Gods of the Isles from reality and released other Gods from other planes of existence. He uses his training in both subjects extensively in his fiction.

I've based the religion of the Isles generally on that of Sumer: the sacred triad of Inanna, Dumuzi, and Ereshkigal

I've based the religion of the Isles generally on that of Sumer: the sacred triad of Inanna, Dumuzi, and Ereshkigal. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63.

Lord of the Isles (David Drake). Redirected from Crown of the Isles). A series of books by author David Drake. In 1997, Drake began his largest fantasy series, Lord of the Isles, using elements of Sumerian religion and medieval era technology. The series consists of nine books broken into two distinct parts, the Lord of the Isles consisting of the first six books, and a final trilogy dubbed the Crown of the Isles. Lord of the Isles (1997, ISBN 0-312-85396-3).

The Mirror of the Worlds is the second in David Drake's Crown of the Isles trilogy, which will conclude the epic Lord of the Isles series.

The Fortress of Glass began the tale of how the new kingdom of the Isles is finally brought into being by the group of heroes and heroines who have been central to all the books in the series: Prince Garric, heir to the throne of the Isles, his consort Liane, his sister Sharina, her herculean sweetheart Cashel, and his sister Ilna.

The powers of magic in the Isles have flooded to a thousand-year peak, and even local magicians can perform powerful spells normally beyond their control. Fantastic forces from all angles threaten, trying to keep Garric and his companions apart to thwart the reunification of the Isles.

Now the world itself has suffered a magical upheaval. The ocean has receded and the Isles have become the higher ground of a newly formed continent. But the new continent is a patchwork of geography from the distant past and future, peopled by creatures from all times and places. Garric and his companions must now struggle for the survival of humanity.

Comments: (7)
Not-the-Same
This being a re-read of the series about 10 years later I'm amazed at how I've enjoyed the authors imagination and story telling. Generally 2 maybe 3 books in a series is about all I want but each story blend with the next while keeping me interested. I thought the main characters were developed and explained well. You do have to read the entire page or chapter to get into flow of the story you can get left out and confused by skipping around like I'm sometimes guilty of. I'm actually having to rebuy the books since I donated them some years ago that is a recommendation in itself the cheapskate that I am. Being a big fan of David Eddings I find this series equally good with my highest recommendation.
Friert
I've read all of the Lord of the Isles + Crown of the Isles volumes over the last year. I've sort of enjoyed the character development and story lines, but am now ready for the saga to end. Mirror of the World is true to the format of all of the others: each key character has a sub-plot story that neatly wraps up and brings everyone back together at the end of the volume. I'm not a big fan of this style because it prevents deep development of any one of the characters; still, I'm invested and looking forward to the final book in the series, to see how it all ends.
Xar
If you like characters with integrity rather than loose assemblages of neuroses, "Mirror of Worlds", the second in the Crown of the Isles series, may be for you.

I know people who like deeply dysfunctional characters because they justify those individuals own continuing decline. I've been adventurous places and done adventurous things. I can say with authority that when in a camp of armed revolutionary communists in Iraq, exploring my translator's suicidal tendencies never appealed to me as character development in real life. I suppose some folks disagree, but I suspect they've never done hard things in dangerous places. David Drake has done hard things in dangerous places and writes interesting characters who make good and bad choices in those situations. The results of those choices are not always predictable, because often bad things happen to good people, but Drake's logic is sound and his situations are quite compelling.

A feature of many fantasy series is the tedious tendency to make the great destiny prophesied by the oracle of...who the hell cares...the driving force of document. Right now David Eddings could offer me $500 to read another of his novels and I'd tell him to pound sand. (For a grand, maybe...I'm not cheap, but I can be had. That still wouldn't get him a decent review if it was another "Tediousdestiniad".) David Drake writes character driven stories. The extraordinary events are terrain the characters make a path through, not rings in the noses of cattle being driven along a set path. Some people aren't comfortable with that kind of responsible behavior. Those people shouldn't stray far from home and rarely accomplish much of lasting value in changing times, because destiny fails to uphold their prejudices. David Drake's work is worth taking with you abroad and while in difficult situations.

In "Mirror of Worlds" Drake throws his characters into a another set of astonishing hardships where they interact with another set of fascinating supporting characters. What is most amazing is that this is the eighth book in the series and the situations and characters are altogether different and still feel fresh. Kore the Ogre is entirely different than Beard the Axe from "Goddess of the Ice Realm"; although both have disquieting hungers and anti-social tendencies, they are quite different disquieting hungers and anti-social tendencies.

"Lord of the Isles/Crown of the Isles" is the fifth major series of David Drake's that I've read in the last twenty years. His literary integrity and appreciation of integrity his characters show has been a comfort to me in hard times in every ocean on the globe. Other authors who cheated me I have put down their work and never read another new product of theirs (Paging Mr. Eddings, paging Mr. David Eddings...please pick up the "you'll never get another dime of mine, you hack" telephone...). David Drake continues to keep the faith and deliver stories and characters worth investing yourself in.

Thank you, David.
Coiriel
Followed the formula of the rest of the series with each main character going off on their own adventures but coming together at the end to wrap up this installment.
Jorius
I've loved the Lord of Isles books since they were first released and have purchased and read each book as it came out in hard back. The last book (first in the ending triology) greatly disapointed me and I was hesitant to pick this one up but decided to give Drake another chance. This book was definitly better than the previous, and was MUCH easier to read (took me a week rather than two months), but the same anoying flaws exist. There still is more action than development. The characters are no more explained than in previous books and the rehashing of what we already know to be true is PAINFUL! Still the plot was better and flowed better than most of the previous novels so that I was compelled to keep reading until the end. I will buy the last installment though I am largely skeptical that the series could be wrapped up in one book. There is way too much still hanging out there.
Kanek
Boring! Throughout the whole book, spend an excessive amount of time developing character backgrounds you already know about from previous books in series. Lots of filler! Can't recommend. And enough already with references to Barka's Hamlet. Good God!
Uttegirazu
as expected
The story is great, the creative mythologies are wonderful, but if you are offended by poor editing, don't get this version. There are so many references to Prince Carrie that there should be a Sex In The City tie in.

Someone needs to update their resume.
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