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eBook White Light epub

by William Barton

eBook White Light epub
  • ISBN: 0380795167
  • Author: William Barton
  • Genre: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Eos (August 1, 1999)
  • ePUB size: 1362 kb
  • FB2 size 1904 kb
  • Formats txt lrf mobi rtf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. If this book isn't nominated for the Nebula I may just have to believe Barton and Capobianco about what idiots the members of the human race have become.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A work of speculative fiction that balances questions about human nature with scientific ideas. If you want to read the best SF novel of the year you will have to read this. It makes those of us who have been reading these two hunger for more; from both of them together and apart (that's a subtle message to Capobianco who needs to follow up his wonderful novel, Burster).

William Renald Barton III (born September 28, 1950) is an American science fiction writer. In addition to his standalone novels, he is also known for collaborations with Michael Capobianco. Many of their novels deal with themes such as the Cold War, space travel, and space opera. Barton also has written short stories that put an emphasis on sexuality and human morality in otherwise traditional science fiction

Barton also has written short stories that put an emphasis on sexuality and human morality in otherwise traditional William Renald Barton III (born September 28, 1950) is an American science fiction writer.

William Burton may refer to: William Burton (antiquary, died 1645) (1575–1645), author of The Description of Leicestershire, 1622, English translator of Achilles Tatius. William Burton (antiquary, died 1657) (1609–1657), English schoolmaster and antiquary. William Burton (died 1781) (c. 1695–1781), British Member of Parliament for Rutland 1730–1734. William Burton (governor) (1789–1866), governor of Delaware. William Burton (Canadian politician) (1888–1944), mayor of Hamilton, Ontario.

With his law firm's office in Newport, Oregon, Barton is listed in three categories of the Best Lawyers in America: Medical Malpractice Law, Non-White-Collar Criminal Defense, and Personal Injury Litigation.

In 2083, with the Earth poisoned beyond repair, two renegade families abandon their hopeless self-destructive society to venture into the heart of a mysterious alien culture that could represent the key to humankind's survival. Reprint.
Comments: (7)
Rarranere
Most of these reviews focus on the fact that the "book has too much sex". Well, that's kind of the point. The novel is heavily focused on the failures of its characters. Yes, given the backdrop of all this cosmic wonderment - alien species, the end of the universe, black holes - they are still **human** and still very much looking out for number one. This is the major character flaw of the human race, the inability to act selflessly to further the species, something the alien "conquerors" appear to have done rather well in their quest to "engulf" the universe. The ending of the book has some major religious implications, and will possibly confuse anyone not already familiar with Tipler's Omega Point theory. But the entire book can be summed up by this one line, spoken between two characters near the end - "Everything matters, Mr. Wolf. That's why excuses always fail". Yes, the book could have been better, but Barton and Capobianco have always been obsessed with the negative dynamic between any group of characters, the interplay between wants and needs. In reality each and every character in their books, ALL of their books, are looking for redemption and reconciliation. In this book, their characters finally find it.
Usic
I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks that the characters in this book spend entirely too much time thinking about sex. I'm not a prude; it's just that it seemed completely out of context.
They make first contact with aliens; they think about sex. They find themselves on an inexplicable, incomprehensible landscape; they think about sex. They fear imminent death; they think about sex. They meet God; they think about sex.
This seems at first to be a brutal view of human nature, but later it becomes downright bizarre. Even chimpanzees who find themselves in a completely alien place and have no idea how they got there wouldn't think about sex five minutes later, but these characters do.
The characters sound interesting - an intelligent woman, her 14-year-old son, a chauvanist pig, a regular guy, a young girl, and her older, wiser mother. Nevertheless, they all have just one thing on their minds.
In case your curiositiy is piqued, no, this isn't an erotic novel. If it was, all of this would make sense. Instead, it's as if the cast of a bad porno movie was suddenly transported into what would have otherwise been a fascinating SF novel.
In a twist of plot at the beginning of the story, the characters are forced to start their journey without the team of scientists they planned to bring. I'm afraid all of the truly interesting and intelligent characters missed the boat.
Shaktizragore
It started out slow and a little interesting. Then, it moved into some real action with some believable SF.
Then came the profanity and the sexual overtones. I could deal with that, but after about 100 pages it grew old. And to make matters worse, all of a sudden the book moves into totally unbelievable situations and events. I don't mean unbelievable like "Wow that's cool!" I mean it like "There's no way this could happen, that's stupid..."
And to top it all off, there was still about 125 pages to go and the story was going downhill fast. It seemed like the writers recognized that the plot was fading and they hadn't developed an ending. So, they apparently decided to throw in a lot more sex scenes more often.
The writers should have stuck to SF and not to their sexual fantasies.
I finished it (against my better judgement...) Only because I am waiting on a book in a series that I am in the middle of. If I had it, this book would have gone by the wayside very quickly.
Anyway, the first third of the book is "ok" to "almost good". After that, you can decide.
Blueshaper
Barton and Cappobianco have done it again. White Light has all the best of their previous collaborations and solo work, but none of the flaws. Yes, as many have said, it is hard to like their characters - that's because you aren't supposed to like them, you are supposed to find them human. They are well-thought out and complex (but not in the popular typology of popular authors where you can figure out a whole character from page one). Their ideas about the metaphysical AND physical are too much for most readers - that is, if you don't want to actually think while you read, perhaps you should try a different book. White Light is, as with their previous efforts, full of insightful references from the SF genre, designed to increase the depth of the work. If this book isn't nominated for the Nebula I may just have to believe Barton and Capobianco about what idiots the members of the human race have become. If you want to read the best SF novel of the year you will have to read this. It makes those of us who have been reading these two hunger for more; from both of them together and apart (that's a subtle message to Capobianco who needs to follow up his wonderful novel, Burster).
Liarienen
Like the author's previous works, White Light examines the human condition against a backdrop of ideas of the grandest scale. Unfortunately, in this instance it feels like the authors have lost control. The characters are one dimensional, able to only focus on wanting sex, having sex or reacting to the consequences of wanting/having sex. The main feeling you have for them is that they all need serious therapy. This against a background that is awesome in its scope and vision, although the effect is diluted considerably since we are given no real explanation for what we are seeing, why it is happening or why it is important. The main effect is that the authors raided their idea files and threw everything into the pot. The characters travel across the universe, encounter cosmic engineering, alternate universes, the Tiplerian Omega Point and ultimately Heaven and God and the only thing they ever think about is who's sleeping with whom. The characters are too twisted to relate to and the background to confused to do more than frustrate me. I closed the book feeling disappointed and frustrated.
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