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eBook Storm Season (Southwestern Writers Collection Series) epub

by William Hauptman

eBook Storm Season (Southwestern Writers Collection Series) epub
  • ISBN: 0292734530
  • Author: William Hauptman
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Action & Adventure
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press; 1st University of Texas Press ed edition (August 15, 2001)
  • Pages: 316 pages
  • ePUB size: 1571 kb
  • FB2 size 1829 kb
  • Formats azw mbr lit docx


Over the years I've given this book to friends, only to have it given back to me with a general "ho-hum" shrug after they read it. I was forced to conclude that I'd imagined something great in it. But every so often I picked it up again and was rewarded for my faith, largely by passages like this one: "The storm towered over him, a sheer wall of marble sixty thousand feet high

William Hauptman's Storm Season was published in the same year as Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses .

William Hauptman's Storm Season was published in the same year as Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses, and to my mind it is an equally classic Texas novel, a work rich in humour and scope and, above all, heart. Hauptman writes as beautifully about emotional stasis as he does about meteorological turmoil. This is a book about tornadoes that has its own cyclonic force: it picks you up, carries you in its grasp, and then sets you down in a surprising and distant place.

Storm Season (Southwestern Writers Collection Series). It ended up being one of the best books I have read in the last 10 years and when I found myself wanting to highlight quotes from every single chapter I knew I had to get my own copy. 0292734530 (ISBN13: 9780292734531). It was almost as if this book was handcrafted to touch I like to flatter myself with the illusion that I am a writer, and then I come upon a book like this and realize I don't know shit. I stumbled on this book by accident in the Southwest Fiction section of my library and picked it up after a brief glance through.

Find nearly any book by William Hauptman. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Blessed McGill A Novel Southwestern Writers Collection Series.

Born in Texas, William Hauptman received a BFA from the University of Texas Drama Department and later traveled to San Francisco and New York. A graduate who received an MFA from the Yale School of Drama, he is the author of both plays and fiction

Born in Texas, William Hauptman received a BFA from the University of Texas Drama Department and later traveled to San Francisco and New York. A graduate who received an MFA from the Yale School of Drama, he is the author of both plays and fiction. His various plays include: Shearwater (American Place Theater) (1974) Heat (The Public Theater) (1974) And Domino Courts and Comanche Cafe (1976) at the American Place Theatre which won a Village Voice Obie Award (1977).

The Wittliff Collections, located on the seventh floor of the Albert B. Alkek Library at Texas State University, was founded by William D. Wittliff in 1987

The Wittliff Collections, located on the seventh floor of the Albert B. Wittliff in 1987. The Wittliff Collections include the Southwestern Writers Collection and the Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection. The Collection holds the papers of numerous 20th-century writers, including Jim Hightower, Cormac McCarthy, Larry McMurtry, Willie Nelson, Sam Shepard, Bud Shrake, Texas Monthly magazine, and William D. Wittliff, among others.

Lone Star Sleuths: An Anthology of Texas Crime Fiction (Southwestern Writers Collection Series). Bill Cunningham, Steven L. Davis, Rollo K. Newsom. Download (pdf, . 5 Mb) Donate Read.

[email protected]: Williams scores SO goal, leads Storm Surge. Classic logo, NHL Heritage Classic name and logo, NHL Stadium Series name and logo, NHL All-Star logo, NHL Face-Off name and logo, NHL. Justin Williams scores the decisive shootout goal in his return and then salutes the fans as part of the Storm Surge. The Carolina Hurricanes forward led his team in a Storm Surge celebration after their 2-1 shootout win on Military Appreciation Night against the New York Islanders. Sunday was Williams' first game for Carolina since he signed one-year contract Jan. 7, and the Hurricanes celebrated military members throughout the game.

Binding tight, text clean. Series: Southwestern Writers Collection Series. Paperback: 176 pages. Purchase of this item will help support the programs and collections of the Johnson County (Kansas) Library. Publisher: University of Texas Press (October 1, 2008).

When a catastrophic tornado strikes his North Texas hometown, a young man caught in the deadening routines of blue collar work is shocked into rediscovering the importance of his life. This mesmerizing novel explores the phenomenon of stormchasing as a search for meaning, for the experience of being intensely alive. It is also, in William Hauptman's words, "the story of a strong family and the love that holds them together in a time of profound hardship and change."

Comments: (7)
Arakus
An engaging story with good, accurate meteorological scenarios that don't bore you with too much weather lingo. I bought it for the storm content, but became truly interested in the characters, too. Not really sure how I feel about the end; it seemed to just kind of peter out, compared to the excellent structure and pacing throughout the rest of the story. But that may just be a stylistic thing with the author that just didn't jibe with me. I was still glad I read it and would recommend it for anyone interested in tornadoes and severe storms and interesting characters.
Gravelblade
excellent novel of life and its struggles in the Texas panhandle...
Ka
I stumbled on this book by accident in the Southwest Fiction section of my library and picked it up after a brief glance through. It ended up being one of the best books I have read in the last 10 years and when I found myself wanting to highlight quotes from every single chapter I knew I had to get my own copy. As a lifelong resident of Texas, both South and West, as a child of the oil boom 80's, as someone who lost their father to cancer, as someone who has struggled with recurring nightmares of tornadoes all her life and as someone who once worked for KCS railroad, this book resonated deeply with me.

This is a book about trains, tornadoes, and Texas. It is also about family and finding your place in the world. I recognized so much of myself in this book and the descriptions of storm chasing and te tornadoes themselves were breathtaking. Every Texan should read this book.
Dilkree
First published in 1992, William Hauptman's first novel (and apparently the last, though we should all hope not) came and went rather quietly. I remember picking it up at a Waldenbooks that spring, drawn by the Larry McMurtry blurb on the cover, and buying it on the spot. I was absorbed right away with the fictional city of Nortex, with the Drennan family, and with the nearly intangible sense of dread and disillusionment set against the backdrop of the Reagan Eighties. At the heart of this big picture is Burl's quest for meaning, symbolized by his chasing tornadoes all across the Panhandle.

Hauptman is definitely a writer's writer, which is not to say he's esoteric or intimidating; if anything his prose is as clear and accessible as water. Over the years I've given this book to friends, only to have it given back to me with a general "ho-hum" shrug after they read it. I was forced to conclude that I'd imagined something great in it. But every so often I picked it up again and was rewarded for my faith, largely by passages like this one: "The storm towered over him, a sheer wall of marble sixty thousand feet high. He had to stare straight up to see the top, which was still in sunlight, a great ceiling of gold. As he watched, it faded to cream, to rose, to ice blue. The lower levels were lead gray. As it rolled away, the moon seemed to rise behind it. Suddenly, the whole storm was lit by one incredible flash of golden lightning. Burl held his breath, but heard nothing."

McMurtry, my favorite writer, once captured the death of the cowboy in his first novel, HORSEMAN, PASS BY. Hauptman here captured a similar watershed moment: the death of Texas oil (through Willie Drennan, Burl's father) and the dreams that went with it (through Burl himself). Kudos to UT Press for keeping THE STORM SEASON in print. Now if only Hauptman would give us more; fifteen years is a long wait.
Painshade
First of all, this is a mighty fine first novel by any reckoning.

Second, what the novel is really about, more than anything, is courage. Many people have been spared the kind of total disintegration in their life that befalls Burl Drennan (the story's protagonist). Adrift and frightened by his increasing love of drugs, having seen most of the best of his life seemingly pass him by in his early twenties, he becomes something of a silent hero--saving his brother's entire family in a vivid reenactment of the 1979 Wichita Falls tornado (the chapter where the tornado, "black as factory smoke," chases Burl and his Mustang across town--a scene vibrating with sparks flying and buildings disintegrating and oil pans clanging on the curb--is apocalyptic literature at its finest). But Burl, like all real heroes, doesn't even realize that he's done anything special.

In Hauptman's beautiful, tough-as-nails prose, we watch Burl try to deal with his obsession with tornadoes after he has stared right into the belly of the beast. We watch him fall in love with a tragic American Indian woman and try to raise her two children--sired by a psychotic biker who is always lurking at the edge of Burl's consciousness, if not confronting him openly (some of these scenes are even scarier than the tornadoes). We watch as he slaves away at his railroad job, shuttling freight back and forth between the Texas Panhandle and Wichita Falls, er, "Nortex," and tries to learn more about the ways of the world from a grizzled, burned-out Vietnam vet.

There's nothing especially pretty about this novel, but it works, and on several levels. Library Journal opines from its ivory tower that Larry McMurtry, Rolando Hinojosa, and Lionel Garcia have more effectively communicated what they call the "Texas disillusion" (as if Library Journal knows something about Texas that the rest of us don't, or that disillusion with one's home turf is a condition unique to Texans). McMurtry is certainly a master, but his Texan characters have little in common with former rock star Burl Drennan--I'm sure McMurtry would be the first to agree--and Burl's search is not therefore somehow less meaningful than, say, Duane Moore's. And as a meteorologist myself, I found laughable "A Customer"'s warning about sex and drugs in the novel. Meteorologists are no more, or less, sex-and-drug-addled than any other bunch of people of my acquaintance. Hey, a lot of us came from troubled backgrounds, which is why we spent so much time staring up at the clouds.

So if you're looking for a very nicely written novel of search and redemption, about a likeable but flawed young man who isn't at all afraid to dirty his hands with the stuff of living (and can still, as it happens, handle the math courses AND conduct a freight train--what a concept!), don't miss "The Storm Season." Five stars.
Drelajurus
This is a great and understated book that tells a very true-to-life story and is probably one of the most underrated novels written in the last fifty years. To the reviewer that said it was "nothing special"--that IS the point. It is a book about life being lived and skillfully makes what might be considered a prosaic life into something more. This book is among my top ten favorite modern books and I recommend it to anyone that wants to read an undervalued but magnificent work of fiction.
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