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eBook Hunter Killer epub

by Geoffrey Jenkins

eBook Hunter Killer epub
  • ISBN: 1440135304
  • Author: Geoffrey Jenkins
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Action & Adventure
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: iUniverse (August 24, 2009)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • ePUB size: 1495 kb
  • FB2 size 1273 kb
  • Formats lrf rtf azw docx


Читать онлайн Hunter Killer.

Читать онлайн Hunter Killer. But Geoffrey Peace, who was in the full glare of the public spotlight in Britain and America because of his part in the controversial American Navy missile project, had died no more excitingly than an overfed businessman who drops dead after a dip at Ramsgate. Now he lay ' slung atween the roundshot '-not old Sir John's way, perhaps, but as near as they could get to it in this age when men had already stepped on to the moon; for Geoffrey Peace's wasn't an ordinary coffin at all.

Author: Geoffrey Jenkins. 2 mortar – ride for a CORPSE2. 3 mam ' zelle ADELE3.

Our heroes embark on the Hunter-Killer submarine HMS Devastation, and from the very beginning the .

Our heroes embark on the Hunter-Killer submarine HMS Devastation, and from the very beginning the voyage is eventful, with every classic submarine story cliche and a few new ones, from a dangerous encouter with a huge undersea creature to the discovery on the sea bed of the ruins of a drowned city. But it is when they rendezvous with the US submarine Willowtrack which is bringing the Veep, that the fertiliser really hits the ventilator.

Geoffrey Ernest Jenkins (16 June 1920 – 7 November 2001) was a South African journalist, novelist and screenwriter. His wife Eve Palmer, with whom he collaborated on several works, wrote numerous non-fiction works about Southern Africa.

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Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780006131892. Release Date:January 1973.

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Geoffrey Jenkins has used the fascinating and unique setting of the Skeleton Coast as a background to a story which combines all the tension and suspense of submarine warfare with an adventure story of such imagination and power.

Geoffrey Jenkins has used the fascinating and unique setting of the Skeleton Coast as a background to a story which combines all the tension and suspense of submarine warfare with an adventure story of such imagination and power as will hold the reader spellbound. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Geoffrey Jenkins.

A top-secret mission to launch a revolutionary Anglo-American missile axed by a budget-conscious government; a nuclear submarine carrying to a secret destination the scientist most concerned with its vindication, who happens to be the Vice-President of the United States; a combination of powerful forces intent on preventing the Vice-President arriving in time for the countdown; a British submarine ace who will stop at nothing to ensure the mission's success and who is none other than Geoffrey Peace, R.N., that memorable figure from A Twist of Sand; these are the ingredients of Geoffrey Jenkins's latest riveting thriller, set in the uncharted coral seas of the Indian Ocean, where the elements also play their unpredictable part.

Add to this magnificent sea story, set a few years from now, a twist of fate which suddenly makes the daring mission one of vital significance for the world, and you have the distinctive brand of adventure which Geoffrey Jenkins has made peculiarly his own.

"A top-class adventure story about the efforts of a diamond-hunting expedition to find a fabulous hoard on the sea-bed off South-West Africa". Observer

"Mr Jenkins does this sort of thing better almost than anybody else...In the realm of the British adventure story-a great tradition-Mr Jenkins keeps the flag flying splendidly". Church Times

"One of the best adventure stories for a long time". Sunday Times

Comments: (3)
Cells
This is the fourth book I have read by this author, and the second best of those. It returns to the two key characters from A Twist Of Sand (which is the first Jenkins book, and the best I've read by him), and returns to some submarine action as well.

A Twist Of Sand is better in almost every respect, but the stuff does manage to work again in Hunter-Killer, buoyed by the one area in which it exceeds A Twist Of Sand: its straight-faced presentation of outrageous premises and events.

Like a lot of Jenkins's stuff, there's a bit of plodding and repetition here and there in the plot (but not too much in this one!); quite a bit of nautical action and terminology (actually, the terminology was mostly easy to follow this time around); and no shortage of descriptions of men respecting each other, admiring each other, and being absolutely astonished at the heroism of each other.

It's a fun book, especially if you like older adventure/thriller paperbacks. (POSSIBLE SPOILER, BUT NOT MUCH: It appears to have a possible connection to a certain James Bond film, though I won't mention any more so as to avoid spoiling anything.)
Brazil
This naval thriller of the cold war and space race era was described by the "New York Times" when it was published in 1966 with the words "action at hurricane velocity" and it delivers this. I first read it as a boy of twelve a few years later, and even at that age I could spot some pretty serious credibility issues with the plot, but it didn't stop the story grabbing my attention.

Even now that, with an adult perspective, the plot appears even more ridiculous than I thought at the time, I can still lose myself in this book for an hour or so.

The story is set in what was from the perspective of 1966 a future era, shortly after the first manned mission to the moon and later than the early 1970's. It is narrated by Captain John Garland, and the first line of the novel is "Geoffrey Peace was dead." (Garland and Peace appear in several of Geoffrey Jenkin's other novels.)

But is Peace really dead - or his "death" part of the elaborate cover scheme for a secret project?

A new Anglo/American rocket system has the potential both to affect the balance of power against the Soviets in the cold war and to boost the space programme - but it has fallen foul of political manouvering on both sides of the Atlantic. To fool both the Soviets and domestic political opponents, elements of the British and US Administrations are plotting to surprise the world with an unexpected mission to the moon, flown by a very high-profile pilot - the Vice President of the USA.

Our heroes embark on the Hunter-Killer submarine HMS Devastation, and from the very beginning the voyage is eventful, with every classic submarine story cliche and a few new ones, from a dangerous encouter with a huge undersea creature to the discovery on the sea bed of the ruins of a drowned city. But it is when they rendezvous with the US submarine Willowtrack which is bringing the Veep, that the fertiliser really hits the ventilator.

Unfortunately, the secrecy surrounding the project has been kept so tight that people with a real need to know - from the CIA to the commanding officer of USS Willowtrack - have not been told what is going on. One of them jumps to a false conclusion: as one of the characters puts it, their mission "is to be sold down the river because some bloody fool thinks we've kidnapped the Vice President."

Suddenly half the world is searching for the Devastation, the Veep, and the other characters in the story. Can they bring off the mission - and should they even try?

Despite all the utterly implausible elements to this story, it is gripping, memorable, and exciting, and I recommend it.

Other nautical thrillers by Geoffrey Jenkins, some of which feature characters who also appear in this book, include:

Scend of the Sea
A Twist of Sand
A Grue of Ice
Varshav
"Hunter Killer" tells the story of how two RN war heroes manage to perfect and launch a new and potentially revolutionary form of rocket engine. Actually, the narrator is along for the ride - reluctantly - as the US navy closes in on them. It seems that the inventor and expected passenger of the missile also happens to be the vice-president of the United States. When the president falls ill, the US engages in a mad rush to locate the missile's inventor and prevent the launch of the new rocket. The narrator's friend, a fellow vet from the RN's submarine service, isn't about to see his hard work hit any snag - so he commandeers the rocket and shanghais the inventor and the narrator, and has his crew run about the Indian Ocean hoping he can set a good launch site for the missile before the Americans catch up.
This story was a bit of a dissappointment - the author gets all the geography right and makes sure that the cuisine enhances the flavor, but the plot itself seems underdone. The mad-race to launch the missile and elude the Americans seems over the top. Also, the cold war pressures seem completely missing, though you'd think they'd have much to do with the development of the nifty rocket. The biggest disspointment was how the book passed itself off as a submarine thriller, but our heroes leave the submarine fairly quickly and don't exactly exchange it for anything as fun. The "Hunter Killer" of the title may refer to the hero, who was a hunter killer of ships and crews in the war, but seems pressed to do more than just escape his pursuers now.
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