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eBook Ragged Dick and Struggling Upward epub

by Horatio Alger Jr.

eBook Ragged Dick and Struggling Upward epub
  • ISBN: 1611044693
  • Author: Horatio Alger Jr.
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Classics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: ReadaClassic.com (February 8, 2011)
  • Pages: 130 pages
  • ePUB size: 1985 kb
  • FB2 size 1836 kb
  • Formats doc azw mbr docx


Horatio Alger, Jr. was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts in 1832, the son of a Unitarian minister. He received a strict upbringing and was educated for a life in the church, graduating from Harvard in 1852

Horatio Alger, Jr. He received a strict upbringing and was educated for a life in the church, graduating from Harvard in 1852. After leaving Harvard, Alger, to his father's disappointment, took a job as a historian in Middlesex County, Massachusetts and later worked as a teacher at a boys' boarding school in East Greenwich, Rhode Island. In 1864 Alger was ordained a minister at the First Parish Unitarian Church of Brewster on Cape Cod. Sixteen months later, however, he was dismissed from the pulpit after being accused of engaging in homosexual relations with two boys.

I prefer Ragged Dick to Struggling Upward. Dick is a very sympathetic protagonist. Finished Ragged Dick, starting Struggling Upward. Have been reading the complete works of Louisa May Alcott, and saw the Horatio Alger at Title Wave and realized it was the male equivalent. I also like the time period in America, the Gilded Age, so similar to our own with super wealthy and terribly poor folk.

STRUGGLING UPWARD by HORATIO ALGER J. Chapter I the waterbury watch.

STRUGGLING UPWARD by HORATIO ALGER JR. Digitized by Cardinalis Etext Press Posted to Wiretap in August 1993, as strugup. Italics are represented as italics. This text is in the PUBLIC DOMAIN. One Saturday afternoon in January a lively and animated group of boys were gathered on the western side of a large pond in the village of Groveton. Prominent among them was a tall, pleasant-looking young man of twenty-two, the teacher of the Center Grammar School, Frederic Hooper, . a recent graduate of Yale College.

Horatio Alger, Jr. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Horatio Alger Jr. (/ˈældʒər/; January 13, 1832 – July 18, 1899) was an American writer of young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination. (/ˈældʒər/; January 13, 1832 – July 18, 1899) was an American writer of young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which had a formative effect on the United States during the Gilded Age.

Ragged Dick; or, Street Life in New York with the Boot Blacks is a Bildungsroman by Horatio Alger J. which was serialized in Student and Schoolmate in 1867 and expanded for publication as a full-length novel in May 1868 by the publisher A. K. Lorin. Loring. It was the first volume in the six-volume Ragged Dick Series and became Alger's best-selling work. The tale follows a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability in 19th-century New York City. It had a favorable reception

Struggling Upward, published nearly thirty years later, followed the same time-tested formulas, and despite critical indifference it, too, had mass appeal. Books related to Ragged Dick and Struggling Upward.

Struggling Upward, published nearly thirty years later, followed the same time-tested formulas, and despite critical indifference it, too, had mass appeal. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

676. 0. Published: 2006. Fame and Fortune; or, The Progress of Richard Hunter. Jr. Horatio Alger History & Fiction. 665. Published: 2007.

Ragged Dick opened his eyes slowly, and stared stupidly in the face of the speaker, but did not offer to get up. "Wake up, you young vagabond!" said the man a little impatiently; "I suppose you'd lay there all day, if I hadn't called yo. "What time is it?" asked Dick.

Alger Jr, Horatio - Ragged Dick. Alger Jr, Horatio - Cast Upon the Breakers. Alger Jr, Horatio - Paul the Peddler. Alger, Horatio - Young Musician.

The hero of "Ragged Dick" is a veritable "diamond in the rough" - as innately virtuous as he is streetwise and cocky. Immediately popular with young readers, the novel also appeals to parents, who responded to its colorful espousal of the Protestant ethic. "Struggling Upward," published nearly thirty years later, followed the same time-tested formulas, and despite critical indifference it, too, had mass appeal. Though the days when Horatio Alger was one of the most widely read authors in America have long since passed, his message--that by dint of hard work, decent morals, good manners and a hefty serving of luck, any American boy can rise from rags to riches—was once read and believed by every significant man of business, politics, literature and academia in America in the early decades of this century. It is impossible to understand these men and the America that they forged without understanding the one author who was most likely a formative influence on them. Except for a couple of decades of despair brought on by the Great Depression, it is, has been, and seems sure to remain, the uniquely American idea that anyone can succeed. Though Alger was not the originator of these beliefs, the many copies of his books certainly contributed to the entrepreneurial spirit of America. There is something refreshing about Alger's straightforward, unmannered writing style. The mere absence of all of the modern stylistic devices that so often make reading modern novels a chore, makes reading the books a pleasure. Then there is the vicarious thrill of reading about a good boy making good. And, beneath the outer layers of poverty, Alger's heroes are enormously appealing. There is a reason that the term "Horatio Alger story" lives on in our lexicon. The concept touches something deep within our psyche, confirming something that we desperately want to believe about individuals and about the type of world and society that we live in. Let the critics ridicule Alger’s stories, but when America stops believing in the power and the truth of the Alger myth, we will cease to be a great nation.
Comments: (7)
Kesalard
I read this story some time ago while I was in college, and it stuck with me. I think about it sometimes when I'm trying to make a big financial decision. Responsible choices vs impulsive choices. This book is a treatise on personal responsibility as well as a view into an older time in America. Well worth the read.
zmejka
This is a good example of Romanticism. Ragged Dick gets amazing opportunities that probably wouldn't happen in real life. It's an easy read, and good for class discussion.
Alsantrius
Great book
Iphonedivorced
ok
Jek
While the very words "Horatio Alger" have passed into American English ("his success was a true Horatio Alger story"), Alger's books have gone terribly out of fashion. They are rarely read, which is one reason I decided to give "Ragged Dick" a try.

Most literary types would find this book poorly written, but it is certainly well enough written to tell its tale, and it's very hard to get a few pages into the book without starting to cheer for Ragged Dick, the boot-black. In a lot of ways, the book is surprisingly realistic: robbery and fraud are constant companions on the streets of New York. But so are sudden acts of compassion and generosity.

Readers will find that Alger ceaselessly preaches the gospel of hard work, thrift, self-reliance, education and good moral character. One of Dick's big steps upwards occurs when he decides to attend a Sunday school, which certainly would not meet with approval from our liberal elite, any more than prayer. Our elite would probably be amazed that Dick accomplishes all of his self-improvement without ever once thinking of government help...it simply never crosses his mind.

The most surprising thing, for me, was that I came to like "Ragged Dick" quite a bit. He's got a wicked sense of humor, referring often to his "urgent luncheon date with the Mayor" or his "Erie Canal shares." I'm pretty sure that this explains why the book sold in the millions: Dick is simply a great character.

The books may have gone out of fashion, but they are NOT out of date. :-)
Doukree
Your great grandfathers read them by the fistful. Even your grandfathers probably read at least a few of them. But the days when Horatio Alger was one of the most widely read authors in America have long since passed. Alger's message--that by dint of hard work, decent morals, good manners and a hefty serving of luck, any American boy can rise from rags to riches--is so clearly anathema to the literati that his dismissal by the critics and the continuing refusal to treat his work as anything other than simple-minded boosterism was virtually foreordained.
However, you would think that Alger's novels would warrant greater scrutiny simply for their obvious cultural impact. It is not an overstatement to say that it is likely that every significant man of business, politics, literature and academia in America in the early decades of this century had read the works of Horatio Alger. How can you hope to understand these men and the America that they forged if you ignore the one author who was most likely a formative influence on them? More than that, it is certainly the case that except for a couple of decades of despair brought on by the Great Depression, it is, has been, and seems sure to remain, the uniquely American idea that anyone can succeed. It is amazing the number of times you will hear folks from foreign countries speak about how this perception of unlimited possibilities is something that you only find in America (Howard Evans on Booknotes one night springs to mind). This after all is why we are the one nation that welcomes immigrants. Other countries assume that immigrants will just get on the dole and stay there; we assume they will not only succeed, but will flourish. Alger is certainly not the originator of these belief, but his millions of books must have contributed something to this entrepreneurial spirit that informs the national soul.
Besides that, they are just fun. There is something refreshing about Alger's straightforward, unmannered writing style. The mere absence of all of the modern stylistic devices that so often make reading modern novels a chore, makes reading the books a pleasure. Besides, who doesn't get a vicarious thrill reading about a good boy making good. And, beneath the outer layers of poverty, Alger's heroes are enormously appealing; here's his description of Richard "Ragged Dick" Hunter:
Dick's appearance as he stood beside the box was rather peculiar. His pants were torn in several places, and had apparently belonged in the first instance to a boy two sizes larger than himself. He wore a vest, all the buttons of which were gone except two, out of which peeped a shirt which looked as if it had been worn a month. To complete his costume he wore a coat too long for him, dating back, if one might judge from its general appearance, to a remote antiquity.
Washing the face and hands is usually considered proper in commencing the day, but Dick was above such refinement. He had no particular dislike to dirt, and did not think it necessary to remove several dark streaks on his face and hands. But in spite of his dirt and rags there was something about Dick that was attractive. It was easy to see that if he had been clean and well dressed he would have been decidedly good-looking. Some of his companions were sly, and their faces inspired distrust; but Dick had a frank, straight-forward manner that made him a favorite.
There is a reason that the term "Horatio Alger story" lives on in our lexicon. The concept touches something deep within our psyche, confirming something that we desperately want to believe about individuals and about the type of world and society that we live in.
Let the critics ridicule them, but when we stop believing in the power and the truth of the Alger myth, we will cease to be a great nation.
GRADE: B
Cktiell
I had heard so much about Horatio Algier Jr., but never took to the time to read any of his stories. Ragged Dick and Struggling Upward are two novelettes that teach Algier's recurring theme that honesty and hard work will always pay. Yes, the stories are overly simplistic, but they are refreshing and make for a good wholesome read. It was fascinating to read these stories that were written in the mid 19th century. When Algier writes about a stagecoach ride in Struggling Upward, he is not doing so from an historical perspective, but likely from personal experience. Don't miss the introduction by Carl Bode. There are some interesting facets of Algier's life that hardly live up to the standards that he set for his heroes. Nonetheless, the author offers light reading with very positive and hopeful messages that are still relevant today.
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