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eBook The Sin Eater epub

by Alice Thomas Ellis

eBook The Sin Eater epub
  • ISBN: 0140092021
  • Author: Alice Thomas Ellis
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New Ed edition (1986)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1943 kb
  • FB2 size 1702 kb
  • Formats lit docx txt lit


Alice Thomas Ellis (born Ann Margaret Lindholm, 9 September 1932 – 8 March 2005) was a British writer and essayist. She was the author of numerous novels and of some non-fiction, including cookery books.

Alice Thomas Ellis (born Ann Margaret Lindholm, 9 September 1932 – 8 March 2005) was a British writer and essayist. Although her married name was Anna Haycraft, she is best known by her nom-de-plume. Ellis was born in Liverpool. Her father was half Finnish, and her mother Welsh. She spent some of her childhood as an evacuee in North Wales, a period she later wrote about in A Welsh Childhood

Alice Thomas Ellis was been short-listed for the Booker prize for this novel. Read such a fascinating novel on my recent flights: Alice Thomas Ellis' "The Sin Eater.

Alice Thomas Ellis was been short-listed for the Booker prize for this novel. She is the author of A Welsh Childhood (autobiography), Fairy Tales and several other novels including The Summerhouse Trilogy, made into a movie starring Jeanne Moreau and Joan Plowright. This was Ellis' first novel but you'd never know, so assured is it. Another entry in the "no characters to like" mode but I loved the book enormously. The Anglo-Welsh in decline, it's mordant, bitter, hysterically funny, wonderfully insightful and a bit of a thriller.

Sin-eater The term sin-eater refers to a person who, through ritual means, would take on by means of I’m reading outside my current database. and because I know very little about Catholic references, I suspect I be missing a great deal in Alice Thomas Ellis’s first book. I do believe I will have spoilers below. But I’m not even sure on that. First, upon launching in I had no idea that a sin-eater is really a thing, and not just a clever book title. So. Had to look that up, googled it

Read such a fascinating novel on my recent flights: Alice Thomas Ellis' "The Sin Eater.

The Inn at the Edge of the World. The Birds of the Air. Alice Thomas Ellis. Fish, Flesh and Good Red Herring.

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Alice Thomas Ellis (also writes as Anna Margaret Haycraft), is a novelist and columnist. Ellis has written several novels beginning with The Sin Eater in 1977. She was born in Liverpool, England in 1932. She attended Bangor Grammar School and the Liverpool School of Art. Ellis wrote a weekly column for the Spectator from 1985 to 1989 and for the Catholic Herald from 1990 to 1996. She co-wrote two books on juvenile delinquency with psychiatrist Tom Pitt-Atkins. Ellis also wrote A Welsh Childhood, a book recounting the history of Wales and featuring the photographs of Patrick Sutherland. The novel won the Welsh Arts Council Award.

Author Alice Thomas Ellis often creates a character who is, to put it politely, ‘the cuckoo in the nest. A not-so-polite description would be a character who stirs up or draws trouble. In the trilogy, The Summer House, that character is the flamboyant, promiscuous, middle-aged, Lili. In The Sin-Eater, the trouble maker is the practically-minded Rose who manages Llanelys with a smooth, yet slightly disapproving touch.

Alice Thomas Ellis, who has died aged 72, was known in the literary world under two names. As Alice Thomas Ellis, her pen name, she was a critically acclaimed novelist, whose fiction combined a sense of tragedy with black comedy; she was also columnist for several years of the popular Home Life series in the Spectator, a weekly dispatch featuring domesticity on the edge of chaos

Alice Thomas Ellis was been short-listed for the Booker prize for this novel.

It was Alice Thomas Ellis's habit during the course of her adult life to announce, both in private and in public, that she had . In 1977 she published her first novel, The Sin Eater, under the pseudonym Alice Thomas Ellis.

We’ll tell you what’s true. You can form your own view. She also became well known for her weekly columns, "Home Life", in The Spectator. In these she described the inhabitants and guests of her house in Gloucester Crescent, with sharp insight and sympathy.

192p pale yellow paperback with illustrated cover and orange spine, some use, neat ink notes to endpaper, pages clean, very good
Comments: (6)
Granigrinn
A long way from "Under Milk Wood." These people are rather like the Anglo-Irish except that they have to be superior not only to the native Welsh but to hordes of vulgar English tourists. As far as I could gather nothing happens. A group of brothers and sisters have come to visit the mansion where their father is ill. They talk,often about religion, and there are a few witty lines (someone thinks Hesiod was an old Welsh poet) and a certain amount of deadpan sick humor. Food is described in great detail, but we do not get told what anyone does for a living or how much anything costs. She has an irritating habit of adding adverbs after the word "said". Something like Aldous Huxley's Chrome Yellow, but not as clever. A touch of Thomas Love Peacock. Long speeches are put into the mouth of Rose that that contain clever observations but do not fit narurally into dialog.
Twentyfirstfinger
Read such a fascinating novel on my recent flights: Alice Thomas Ellis' "The Sin Eater." This was Ellis' first novel but you'd never know, so assured is it. Another entry in the "no characters to like" mode but I loved the book enormously. The Anglo-Welsh in decline, it's mordant, bitter, hysterically funny, wonderfully insightful and a bit of a thriller.
Nalmezar
I thought I was getting the book that was adapted for a Twilight Zone episode. It isn't, but it's a deceptively easy read that, in the end, makes you question how you live.
Alianyau
The Anglo-Welsh patriarch of an old family is dying in Llanelys, and his children and their spouses gather at the estate to await the end. Rose, the Irish wife of the oldest son Henry, is the sensible mother of twins who has worked to restore the estate and its gardens, make it a home, and, through her cooking, provide a sense of family warmth. In sardonic contrast to her is Angela, the oh-so-upperclass wife of the second son Michael, who looks down on Rose and everyone else not of the family's "class" and breeding. Arriving sometime later is the only daughter, Ermyn, young, schoolgirlish, and disturbed. Severely repressed and often ignored, she looks for answers in exotic religious expression, and like the sin eater of Welsh legend, believes she can take upon herself the sins of the Captain and the family.
Ellis wields language like a rapier, skewering family members for their caste-conscious concern with their "blood," and showing with mordant humor their deliberate separation from the community. The family is changing, if Rose, daughter of an Irish veterinarian, is any indication, just as Llanelys, now a tourist destination, has changed. But though the family may deserve to be satirized for its meaningless rituals, the local population is not exempt from Ellis's dissection, either. Phyllis, the caretaker for the Captain, saves the best of the family's food to feed her fat grandson, and he steals liquor and makes lewd, sexual overtures to Rose and Ermyn. Other townspeople mock the family, show their rudeness, and even break their windows.
Stunning imagery, delicious turns of phrase, and lively dialogue make the narrative sparkle. The hands of Rose's small twins are described as "so delicate and fine they felt like broken toothpicks in little silk bags," while the sea is "smooth and wrinkle-free, like the face of a saint or a psychopath." Blood is carried as a motif throughout, and references to old Welsh legends connect the family with the past and offer dire portents of the future. Despite the harshness Ellis exhibits toward some of her characters, the reader develops empathy toward Rose and understands that poor Ermyn needs more emotional help than she is likely to get, but Ellis never allows the reader to get comfortable with this family's world. She shows that just as the sin eater cannot take on the sins of others, life has no guarantees of happy endings. Mary Whipple
Llallayue
As in her "The Inn at the Edge of the World" Ms. Ellis gives us a group of unlikeable people who dislike each other. They are a household of aristocrats living on an estate in a Welsh seaside village. Despite the hostility that exists among them they are allied against the working class who are in ascendance, and whom they view as upstarts. They also barely tolerate the summer tourists. The narrative is unified by anticipation of a patriarch's death and by an annual cricket match that has become an "us vs. them" event. Rose, who marries into the family is especially well-drawn. Her casual cruelty in word and deed is often breathtaking. For example, she serves fat-laden meals, redolent of cream and butter--killing with kindness. The final tragedy is unexpected yet the logical outcome of the cruelty and weakness that have gone on before.
My problem with the novel is that there seems to be no right way to behave according to Ellis. The sister-in-law who speaks charitably of the working class comes off as condescending. The household staff are drunk and sly. The patriarch is portrayed as amoral and domineering. As fine a word-weaver as she is, surely a writer of such intelligence could do more than expose the weaknesses of every character she creates.
ALAN
When I read the author's obituary (she died earlier in 2005), this sounded like a writer I'd like: interested in religion, wryly misanthropic, novels set in British and Welsh locales, and bittersweet comedies of manners with a stress on the former element. Unfortunately, this novel seemed to sink itself irretrievably into the gloomy village it labors to describe. I felt as if I was watching a Masterpiece Theatre episode for Anglo-agoraphobes that left me indifferent rather than involved.

The elements for a good story are there: Thomas Ellis can initially establish distinguishable if satirically wounded character types, but they listlessly poke about the pages, muttering and pottering about without a real plot to entice you or action that shakes up the doldrums that the author evidently has lived in herself so long that she lacks the cognition to make such a realm vivid and intriguing for first-time visitors to her Anglo-Welsh family, who seem trapped in amber as much as the dim and clouded ambiance that pervades this dreary book.
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