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eBook The Last Werewolf (The Last Werewolf Trilogy) epub

by Glen Duncan

eBook The Last Werewolf (The Last Werewolf Trilogy) epub
  • ISBN: 0857864130
  • Author: Glen Duncan
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Canongate Books; Export edition (February 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • ePUB size: 1942 kb
  • FB2 size 1528 kb
  • Formats docx azw rtf lrf


The Last Werewolf book. In Jake, Glen Duncan has given us a werewolf for the twenty-first century-a man whose deeds can only be described as monstrous but who is in some magical way deeply human.

The Last Werewolf book. A bit on the elderly side (he turns 201 in March), but otherwise in the pink of health. The Here is a powerful, definitive new version of the werewolf legend-mesmerising and incredibly sexy.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Cerebral and campy, philosophical and ironic, The Last Werewolf is a novel that’s always licking its bloody lips and winking at u. .

Now, the last of his kind, he knows he can't go o. ut as Jake counts down to suicide, a violent murder and an extraordinary meeting plunge him straight back into the desperate pursuit of life. co/1OdakeB)! Категория.

The last werewolf, by Glen Duncan. Wolf drains from the wrists and shoulders last. In spite of what I’d just heard I thought: Madeline can give me a massage later, warm jasmine oil and the long-nailed magnolia hands I don’t love and never will. 1st American ed. p. cm. eISBN: 978-0-307-59663-5. 1. Werewolves-Fiction. What are you going to do?

The Last Werewolf, Bloodlines Trilogy by Glen Duncan. Urban Fantasy, Noir, Horror-Suspense. A veil of melancholy has fallen over Jacob Marlowe. He's the last of his kind.

The Last Werewolf, Bloodlines Trilogy by Glen Duncan. Hunted by his enemies and haunted by his past, he is worn out by centuries of decadence and debauchery, and by the demands of his lunatic appetites. He decides to submit to the authorities at the next full moon.

Notwithstanding that this book feels like a literary giant has decided to give a master class in genre fiction, I enjoyed it. Читать весь отзыв.

Серия: "The Last Werewolf Trilogy". For two centuries Jacob Marlowe has wandered the world, enslaved by his lunatic appetites and tormented by the memory of his first and most monstrous crime

Серия: "The Last Werewolf Trilogy". For two centuries Jacob Marlowe has wandered the world, enslaved by his lunatic appetites and tormented by the memory of his first and most monstrous crime. Now, the last of his kind, he knows he can't go on. But as Jake counts down to suicide, a violent murder and an extraordinary meeting plunge him straight back into the desperate pursuit of life. Издательство: "TBS mix" (2012).

Jake is a werewolf, and after the unfortunate and violent death of his one contemporary, he is now the last of his species. Although he is physically healthy, Jake is deeply distraught and lonely. Jake’s depression has carried him to the point where he is actually contemplating suicide–even if it means terminating a legend thousands of years old. It would seem to be easy enough for him to end everything. But for very different reasons there are two dangerous groups pursuing him who will stop at nothing to keep him alive.

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For two centuries Jacob Marlowe has wandered the world, enslaved by his lunatic appetites and tormented by the memory of his first and most monstrous crime. Now, the last of his kind, he knows he can't go on. But as Jake counts down to suicide, a violent murder and an extraordinary meeting plunge him straight back into the desperate pursuit of life.
Comments: (7)
Questanthr
I'll start with saying this is an entertaining little read, which is all I was really looking for. Unlike many vampire/werewolf books, it was written for adults using adult themes and an adult reading level. There's your standard werewolf violence and angst but it is mixed with some cool secret-agent and historical elements. The main character's nearly 200 year history is interesting and his relationship with his familiar was compelling. I also found myself forgetting that the main character was a monster who kills and eats people and, instead, found his hunter to be the antagonist he was written to be.
The end was pretty predictable but that was forgivable because the journey there was fun.
My problem with the book was the extremely awkward sex scenes. I would be reading along enjoying the story and then *BAM* sex. The author used really foul descriptions of graphic sex and the genitalia associated with it. The other people reading this with me agreed: It seems like the sex scenes were written by a guy who had never actually had sex and whose entire experience on the subject comes from fetishistic pornography.
Fordrelis
I've read a couple of Glen Duncan's other works ("Hope", "I, Lucifer") and have always enjoyed his style of writing and, let me tell you, "The Last Werewolf" does not disappoint. Duncan's way of making you understand a mentality that isn't your own is impeccable and he gives you such a broad exposure to a life you could only be left imagining. With the many twists that sucker you right in the gut, I always find myself either going "Aha! I knew it!" or grimacing because I feel like I should have seen it coming, all of which is what kept me reaching for this book over and over, *needing* to get it finished. I wasn't even done yet and I had already ordered the next in the series. I can't wait to continue reading this story.
Mave
Not only is Glen Duncan one of the most talented writers alive, but his books are incredibly psychologically insightful and nuanced. His writing is brutal, ruthless, and true, and his main character is worthy of Mephistopheles. I read everything Duncan has ever written, and this first book in this series is probably his best. Passionately recommend.
showtime
yes! the werewolf is a serial killer, and he has been doing it for a very, very long time. he reminds me somewhat of lestat, the vampire, in some ways.....how to justify killiing humans? how to live, at the expense of humans, over hundreds of years? should one live on at all costs? do you just accept your fate? neither character was made a vampire or a werewolf voluntarily- they were forced into the life of a monster. lestat usually killed "evildoers".... but not always! this werewolf is indiscriminate, he just kills someone every month, to stay alive, and structures the murder so as to get away without leaving any clues to his identity. and one killing in particular was very hard to read about.....to me this is a horror novel, not a paranormal book as i had thought.

the werewolf's relationship with his familiar, harley, reminds me of david talbot, lestat's close friend. there are some vampires in this book, and they do figure in the plot.

there are many, many racy scenes, with very explicit descriptions galore....f.y.i.

this is a literary book; the writing is beautiful at times, poetic even, but sometimes i felt the writer obscured what he wanted to say by super complex wording. however, this writer is very good, even if he is talking about murder, gore, and debauchery. kind of hard to feel a lot of sympathy for the main character because of this, whether he asked to be a monster or not.

i did want to find out what happened, and a lot does happen, leading to many plot twists. but, in the end, i was not able to care much about the werewolf; kind of like reading the memoirs of a paranormal jeffrey dahmer, and being asked to find interest in his thoughts. i prefer lestat, who is far more "human", if a vampire.
Ienekan
My first Glen Duncan book was <i>I, Lucifer</i>, which I absolutely loved and have recommended to countless people. Having now read TLW, it has definitely met my expectations. Duncan excels at memoir-style first person account fiction. For me, the beauty of this technique is that I personally seem to be more forgiving of any irritating ticks in his writing style, such as those I see mentioned in other reviews. First, several people feel his complex vocabulary is gratuitous. I actually think there is nothing wrong having to quickly google a word I don’t know, though having read Lucifer, I now have to look up words much less frequently when reading a Glen Duncan novel. (For this reason, I actually recommend Duncan’s books for anyone studying for the GRE!) However, if I do ever come across a sentence that *might* seem awkward due to the “reckless” use of Duncan’s extraordinary vocabulary (not that one particular sentence comes to mind) I simply attribute it to the character. I mean, he’s only human—er, <i>Wulf</i>, right? Second, the only really significant irritation I have with Duncan’s writing is his severe underuse of commas. Has anyone else noticed this??? Maybe it’s a Brit thing.

In TLW, the voice of the main character, Jake, is astonishingly what I would expect from a 200 year old werewolf that has become slightly apathetic toward existence. There are a number of familiar mechanisms in the plot, i.e. a vampire vs werewolf feud and a secret agency that combats occult phenomenon. However, Duncan approaches these mechanisms in new ways, one method of course being from the point of view of the seemingly least loved paranormal entity (the werewolf).

Overall, I think the man is a brilliant wordsmith. But the main topic I would like to comment on is that Duncan is doing really important work, insisting that this type of genre be held to the same rigors of REAL literature. This isn’t cheaply written drivel for the tweens that swarm to the literary vacuum that encompasses certain other <i>particular</i> vampire or werewolf books. <i>**Ahem**</i> (I’m sure you get the reference whether you’ve suffered through even a paragraph of said drivel or not.) Duncan develops dynamic, multifaceted characters that have pretty significant personal flaws to overcome (or at least manage). Duncan touches on complex ideas of morality and instinct and requires that the reader pause to consider what situations blur the lines between right and wrong. He also breathes fresh new life into what can be a tired and redundant storyline.
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