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eBook The Castle in the Forest: A Novel epub

by Norman Mailer

eBook The Castle in the Forest: A Novel epub
  • ISBN: 0316027383
  • Author: Norman Mailer
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House; Airside Ed edition (2007)
  • Pages: 496 pages
  • ePUB size: 1764 kb
  • FB2 size 1346 kb
  • Formats txt doc lrf mobi


All rights reserved Chapter 7. An Epilogue. The Castle in the Forest.

Published in the United States by Random House, an imprint of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York. The castle in the forest: a novel, Norman Mailer. p. cm. 1. Hitler, Adolf, 1889–1945-Family-Fiction. Chapter 7.

The final work of fiction from Norman Mailer, a defining voice of the postwar era, is also one of his most ambitious .

The final work of fiction from Norman Mailer, a defining voice of the postwar era, is also one of his most ambitious, taking as its subject the evil of Adolf Hitler. The narrator, a mysterious SS man in possession of extraordinary secrets, follows Adolf from birth through adolescence and offers revealing portraits of Hitler’s parents and siblings. A crucial reflection on the shadows that eclipsed the twentieth century, Mailer’s novel delivers myriad twists and surprises along with characteristically astonishing insights into the struggle between good and evil that exists in us all.

Mailer's last novel, The Castle in the Forest: A Novel is reminiscent of . Lewis' ScrewTape Letters - except this demon is assigned an incestuous family in Linz by the name of Heidler who change their name to Hitler to sound more upscale! Yeah, right

Mailer's last novel, The Castle in the Forest: A Novel is reminiscent of . Lewis' ScrewTape Letters - except this demon is assigned an incestuous family in Linz by the name of Heidler who change their name to Hitler to sound more upscale! Yeah, right. Young "Adi" is pampered by his Mutti and beaten or ignored by Herr Vater, Alois Hitler, a womanizing, petty bureaucrat with a self-agrandized ego.

The Castle in the Forest is the last novel by writer Norman Mailer, published in the year of his death, 2007. It is the story of Adolf Hitler's childhood as seen through the eyes of Dieter, a demon sent to put him on his destructive path

The Castle in the Forest is the last novel by writer Norman Mailer, published in the year of his death, 2007. It is the story of Adolf Hitler's childhood as seen through the eyes of Dieter, a demon sent to put him on his destructive path. The novel explores the idea that Hitler was the product of incest. It forms a thematic contrast with the writer's immediately previous novel The Gospel According to the Son (1999), which deals with the early life of Jesus.

Электронная книга "The Castle in the Forest: A Novel", Norman Mailer

Электронная книга "The Castle in the Forest: A Novel", Norman Mailer. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Castle in the Forest: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Not if you're Norman Mailer

Not if you're Norman Mailer. Mailer can't resist psychosexualizing everything. Two more novels charting Hitler's further life were to be written, but Mailer died the same year this was published. Though a fictional premise, the reasons put forth in The Castle in the Forest by Norman Mailer resonated with me: the devil was present at his conception, and that he was the incestuous offspring of his father and his father's niece, which intensified his worst traits, much like animals who are inbred. And why not? Whose upbringing could have been so horrible to make them into an Adolph Hitler?

This remarkable novel about the young Adolf Hitler and his family is Norman Mailer’s most perfect apprehension of. .

This remarkable novel about the young Adolf Hitler and his family is Norman Mailer’s most perfect apprehension of the absolutely alien.

Written by Norman Mailer. Narrated by Harris Yulin

Written by Norman Mailer. Narrated by Harris Yulin. Now, in his first major work of fiction in more than a decade, The Castle in the Forest offers what may be Mailer's consummate literary endeavor: he has set out to explore the evil of Adolf Hitler. A tapestry of unforgettable characters, The Castle in the Forest delivers its myriad twists and surprises with astonishing insight into the nature of the struggle between good and evil that exists in us all.

An excerpt from The Castle in the Forest. You may call me . That is short for Dieter, a German name, and . will do, now that I am in America, this curious nation

An excerpt from The Castle in the Forest. will do, now that I am in America, this curious nation. If I draw upon reserves of patience, it is because time passes here without meaning for me, and that is a state to dispose one to rebellion. Can this be why I am writing a book? Among my former associates, we had to swear never to undertake such an action. I was, after all, a member of a matchless Intelligence group. The narrator, a mysterious SS man in possession of extraordinary secrets, follows Adolf from birth through adolescence and offers revealing portraits of Hitler's parents and siblings.

Fiction, Adult, Thriller
Comments: (7)
Linn
This book received very mixed reviews--people complained that it needed focus and editing. I agreed until I got near to the end of the book and realized I'd misunderstood Mailer's intention. The story is not a fictional biography of Adolf Hitler, but a fictional autobiography of a demon. Consequently, the seeming 'digressions' on Nicholas II and Elisabeth belong to the story in a significant way.

Taking that perspective, I understood what Mailer was trying to say with this book. Mailer, at the end of his life and confronting the ultimate reality, was thinking about the big questions. Is there more than this existence? Is there a god and a life after death? What are good and evil, from whence do they come, how do they function in this life? Why are we here? How much free will do we really have?

"The Castle in the Forest" leaves only hints at possible answers to these fundamental questions. In the end, I don't think Mailer found the answers. I certainly don't feel any closer to understanding after reading, but but have a warm sense of companionship in my unknowing. Reading "The Castle in the Forest" is an intellectual exercise, and that's emphatically not a criticism.

My final recommendation: if you are looking for insight into Adolf Hitler's character, don't buy this book. If you are looking for entertainment, relaxation, or fun, don't buy this book. However, if you are interested in expanding your intellectual horizons, if you want to discuss difficult questions and are prepared to forego conclusions, buy this book.
Original
This is my second attempt to read Norman Mailer (after "The Naked and the Dead"), and it will probably be my last. File this one in the "Monumentally Misguided" category, with "Swing Kids" and "Triumph of the Spirit." Mailer tries to use the grist of Hitler's childhood as the basis of a story about a demon loosed upon Earth, and the book sinks under the weight of an unworkable concept. Like with "The Naked and the Dead," the writing shines brilliantly in patches, but, as with that work, the gems are buried under turgid, moribund passages that made reading this one a chore. I couldn't finish it, and I will conclude with the same recommendation Bob Odenkirk gave for a John Tesh CD on an old episode of "Mr. Show": Not recommended for any living thing.
Dibei
Mailer's last novel, The Castle in the Forest: A Novel is reminiscent of C.S. Lewis' ScrewTape Letters - except this demon is assigned an incestuous family in Linz by the name of Heidler who change their name to Hitler to sound more upscale! Yeah, right. Young "Adi" is pampered by his Mutti and beaten or ignored by Herr Vater, Alois Hitler, a womanizing, petty bureaucrat with a self-agrandized ego. Mailer cleverly links events in Adi's young life with imprints that will shape his actions and beliefs decades later. For example, his father keeps bees and periodically has to burn a diseased hive or "the sickness will spread to all the bees," foreshadowing Hitler's gas chambers. What I found most interesting was the relationship of Satan (called "The Maestro") with his worker-demons -- much like the Queen Bee and drones to continue the apiary analogy, as well. Also, angels (called "cudgels") have an interesting relationship to demons and to God Almighty ("The Dumbkopf"; or D.K.). Midway through the story, Mailer also makes a strange detour for several chapters to discuss Czar Nickolas and the Russian coronation in 1895 which doesn't have much if anything to do with the Hitler story. All in all, I'd give this historical/philosophical/theological novel a B/B+ for an interesting take on how & why the evil of Nazism originated and spread.
Coirad
A fine book for these dark days. Mailer wrote it as one watches an accident take place. The historic setting is merely a convenience; the man was not writing about our time. In the same way, it is not simply a book about the family origins and early youth of Adolph Hitler. Mailer was too sophisticated a thinker and gifted a writer to use Hitler as more than a trope, rather than a metaphor for the the binary opposition of good and evil. Hitler is too convenient a villain to take literally.

As I read the book, the more convinced I became that Mailer accepted the living presence of good and evil and the ontological consequences of the tension of such a dynamic in human lives and affairs. Actually, at a certain point, the diabolic narrative seemed to suggest the success of Bill Clinton, as much as Hitler's, and Clinton's success becomes a metaphor of the particular and pernicious influence of the demonic.

Charlie Rose once asked Mailer why people liked Clinton, and Mailer answered, "Because he doesn't demand anything of anyone." This may seem like a curious interpretation of the Former President's appeal, but considering the techniques described by the book's demonic narrator, one ought to give this interpretation some weight.

Consider: "Yes, he could tell stories about his childhood to bring tears to the eyes, and pure sorrow to the hearts of all who listened. It had not come all at once, this immaculate bedrock of a lie I had fixed to those folds of the brain where memory is stored in close embrace with mendacity. My art was to replace a true memory by a false one..." Or, "For the Maestro often pointed to my work on this matter: 'There is no better way to usurp the services of a high political leader than by this method. They must not be able to distinguish certain lies from the truth. They are of considerable use to us when they do not even know that they are lying, because the mistruth is so vital to their needs.' "

The more Mailer wrote of lying and the uses of lies the less the novel became an example of "historical fiction" and more a supremely subtle depiction of contemporary events and personalities, as well as a punishing reflection on the the presence of evil in our current politics, where the most banal men and women have, through deceptions, both petty and significant, contaminated our body politics.

If we read this work as merely historical fiction, or as a meditation on evil in the person of Hitler, we are doing both this fine Book, and Mailer's remarkable imagination and skills as a story teller, a terrible disservice.
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