eBook Fergus epub

by Brian Moore

eBook Fergus epub
  • ISBN: 0006548342
  • Author: Brian Moore
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Flamingo; New Ed edition (1995)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • ePUB size: 1557 kb
  • FB2 size 1186 kb
  • Formats lit lrf lrf doc


Brian Moore, 1921 - 1999 Brian Moore was born in Belfast on August 25, 1921 to Doctor James . It was nominated for the Booker Prize and was his best selling book

Brian Moore, 1921 - 1999 Brian Moore was born in Belfast on August 25, 1921 to Doctor James Bernard Moore and Eileen McFadden. He attended St. Malachy's College, a Catholic school, where the students where beaten on the hands daily. He left the college without a School Leaving Certificate because he failed Math. It was nominated for the Booker Prize and was his best selling book. Several of his books were made into films such as "The Luck of Ginger Coffey," "Catholics," "The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne" and "The Temptation of Eileen Hughes" was adapted for television.

Brian Moore (/briˈæn/ bree-AN; 25 August 1921 – 11 January 1999), was a novelist and screenwriter from Northern Ireland who emigrated to Canada and later lived in the United States. He was acclaimed for the descriptions in his novels of life in Northern Ireland after the Second World War, in particular his explorations of the inter-communal divisions of The Troubles, and has been described as "one of the few genuine masters of the contemporary novel".

Fergus, a novel by Northern Irish-Canadian writer Brian Moore, was published in 1970, in the United States by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. It tells the story of Fergus Fadden, an Irish-born writer living in California, who is haunted by ghosts from his past, including that of his father. Moore's biographer, Patricia Craig, described it as "wholly original, and singularly diverting". Jo O'Donoghue says that, in Fergus, "Moore carries the theme of family influence to an extreme conclusion".

Fergus, a Novel book. One of the only Brian Moore books that I haven't enjoyed. Very confusing with a long list of characters who are difficult to remember

Fergus, a Novel book. Very confusing with a long list of characters who are difficult to remember. I reached the end ( gratefully) and there didn't seem to be any conclusion to the story that had been built up.

Past and present all a-jumble. com User, May 9, 2006. Fergus Fadden is going through a rough stretch: an Irishman residing in the strange world of Hollywood, he is adapting a novel he wrote for the movies, but is afraid he'll have to change more of it than he wishes. He needs to pay alimony to his ex-wife, however, so can't easily abandon the assignment.

AUTHOR: Moore, Brian. Acceptable - Very well read. May have significant wear and tear and contain notes & highlighting. Read full description.

com's Brian Moore Author Page. Books By Brian Moore.

In Fergus, Fergus Fadden is an Irishman who has become a writer and whose success with his first two novels has .

In Fergus, Fergus Fadden is an Irishman who has become a writer and whose success with his first two novels has attracted the attention of a Hollywood producer, who has now employed to write a script for his next film. Very Mooreish, because it was Brian Moore’s second novel The Feast of Lupercal which caught the eye of Alfred Hitchcock, who then employed him to script Torn Curtain (an experience Moore famously described as awful, like washing floors ). Hitchcock is said to be the inspiration for the character of Bernard Boweri in Fergus, although Boweri is a producer rather than a director.

Moore, Brian, Fergus: A Novel. MELVYN BRAGG Evening Standard. Brian Moore brings absolute conviction to this terrible and comic haunting. Moore's acute understanding of our basest instincts in the face of loneliness, lust and betrayal confirms his place as one of our finest living novelists.

Comments: (3)
Bliss
I had tired of the "hard" reading I've been tied up with of late, so I took a quick novel break, reading this brief work by Brian Moore nearly straight through. In a way, it's a work similar to John Fowles' <cite>Mantissa</cite>, although in many ways it's a more successful book. It does lack an ending, but the process of discovery in the novel is still quite pleasant.
Venemarr
Fergus is, in my opinion, one of Brian Moore's best novels. Apart from being a really good read, it is also very well written in the literary sense. It is about ghosts, both living and dead. It is also about coming to terms with one's past. A dialogue between past and present. There are resonances of James Joyce in parts of the book. I found it quite a moving book.
godlike
Fergus Fadden is going through a rough stretch: an Irishman residing in the strange world of Hollywood, he is adapting a novel he wrote for the movies, but is afraid he'll have to change more of it than he wishes. He needs to pay alimony to his ex-wife, however, so can't easily abandon the assignment. Then one day he wakes up and encounters his dead father on his couch wanting to talk. This hallucination, if that's what it is, triggers a number of flashbacks into Fergus's past. He hopes to get from his father an answer to the "meaning of life" question (his father offers him no clue) and, even more, if there's an afterlife. All his father can tell him about that is to have faith and believe. Of course, no one, not even his dead father, can give Fergus any definite answers, for they all reside in Fergus himself.

The least realistic of his novels, the reader sometimes has difficulty understanding what Moore is trying to get at. Some scenes, such as the one involving 20 questions and another involving being chased by a mob, are also confusing. But Moore characterizes Fergus well, especially his struggle to fight his demons brought about by the hallucinations. But I have to admit it's not among my favorite of Moore's novels.
eBooks Related to Fergus
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020