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eBook Break It Down (High Risk Books) epub

by Lydia Davis

eBook Break It Down (High Risk Books) epub
  • ISBN: 1852424214
  • Author: Lydia Davis
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Serpent's Tail (April 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 196 pages
  • ePUB size: 1443 kb
  • FB2 size 1946 kb
  • Formats doc mobi rtf azw


I bought the "Break It Down" book. Enjoyed all the stories in it and have recommended it to friends.

I bought the "Break It Down" book. She is a wonderful writer. Some stories were intriguing, but the writing was so minimal in it's style that it left me feeling somewhat cold and empty-even depressed.

Mr. Burdoff’s Visit to Germany. Walking slowly, with difficulty, in her high heels through the sand, legs well apart, she holds her hard shiny purse by its strap and it swings wildly back and forth.

Mr. The sea breeze presses her flowered dress against her thighs and the hem of it flutters gaily around her knees, but her tight silver curls are motionless and she frowns as she plunges on.

Many of the stories in this book were previously published in the following collections by Lydia Davis: The Thirteenth Woman (Living Hand, 1976) . Lydia Davis, Break It Down. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity.

Many of the stories in this book were previously published in the following collections by Lydia Davis: The Thirteenth Woman (Living Hand, 1976); Story and Other Stories (The Figures, 1983). Sketches for a Life of Wassilly was first published by Station Hill Press in 1981.

New York : High Risk Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Break It Down (2011). Authors: Lydia Davis. Two hats bob along side by side-a Homburg high up on an old man and a black veiled affair with cherries on a little woman-and under the hats the old people argue. Another old woman, bent and feeble, crosses the street slowly in front of our car, looking angry that she has been made to wear this large cone-shaped red hat that is pressing down so heavily on her forehead. Yet another old woman walks on a difficult sidewalk and is cautious about where she sets her feet.

The friend who introduced me to this book - reprinted nicely by High Risk, although I read it in the original, sadly out of print hardback - pointed out that one probably wouldn't want to hang out with Lydia Davis. She's obsessive and a bit morbid, but she nails certain male-female relations cleanly on the head. Smart women do make bad bedmates sometimes, but their books do not.

Listen to books in audio format. Break It Down is Davis at her best. In the words of Jonathan Franzen, she is "a magician of self-consciousness. Lydia Davis once again proves in the words of the Los Angeles Times "one of the quiet giants in the world of American fiction. Reading now. Until Trevor.

Items related to Break It Down (High Risk Books). Hers is a very human vision that must be taken seriously and that can't help but be enjoyed?

Items related to Break It Down (High Risk Books). Lydia Davis Break It Down (High Risk Books). ISBN 13: 9781852424213. Break It Down (High Risk Books). Hers is a very human vision that must be taken seriously and that can't help but be enjoyed? San Francisco Chronicle ?Strong, seemingly effortless,and haunting work?

Break It Down (1986). This collection of short stories contains 33 stories in 140 pages. We were not on the street but in front of a high hedge.

Break It Down (1986). Fourteen stories are less than three pages long; most of those are a page or a paragraph. He pointed toward an opening in the hedge and said that way and then I’m I am sure said good luck.

This work is a collection of 34 stories which reassure the reader that reality is orderly and reasonable. However, as the characters in the stories prove by their fallibility, misunderstanding and confusion are inherent in everyday life.
Comments: (7)
DarK-LiGht
I had never heard of Lydia Davis. One day while internet surfing I landed on a podcast of the wonderful author James Salter reading a short story by Davis titled "Break It Down." I loved the story of an intimate, sensual, loving relationship between two people who only met occasionally to be with one another. Lydia Davis has a talent for being able to describe warm skin, a dark room, the sound of coffee cups being placed on a saucer or the essence of a woman's fragrance on a shirt, that is unforgettable. Her stories are short and stimulate thought. I bought the "Break It Down" book. Enjoyed all the stories in it and have recommended it to friends. She is a wonderful writer.
Faulkree
Ms Davis has a shtick of writing very short stories. This volume has a wide variety. Many relate to relationships in progress. Because they're short I thought it would be a great volume to read aloud to my lover, but take note: Read the intended story ahead of time! Some of them are real downers and may not set the appropriate mood. Many are worth a chuckle or an existential moment, all the same.
The_NiGGa
The reviews were raving, and "Break it Down" was the reason I bought the book (hearing it recited on a podcast), but upon reading the rest - it just wasn't my cup of tea. The writing was a bit too dry and matter of fact for my personal taste. You get the point of what she is conveying, but it's short and very "now this is happening... and then this." style of writing. One of her ravs said "...one of the most precise..." I would say that's a fitting description - precise and direct. I suppose it's quite like a stream of consciousness in style. Anyhow, I still recommend you to check it out for yourselves. Her style is definitely different.
the monster
I find it difficult to properly address the broad spectrum of writing in Lydia Davis' Break It Down. There are traditional stories like "Story," "What an Old Woman Will Wear," and the title story as well.
There are complex, compact, and hauntingly accurate micro-stories like "In a House Beseiged," "What She Knew," "The Fish," "City Employment," and the chilling, "The Mother."
Last, there are strange mind trips like "Liminal: The Little Man", and "French Lesson I" that challenge not only the art of writing fiction, but also expand and stretch the meaning of words and language. Davis tries very hard to get the reader to understand her complex thoughts regarding the liminal, the barely persceptible. She also guides the reader through a French lesson, where at the story's end, non-French speakers will understand the story in French. It's mind-boggling.
I give her four stars, because many of the stories miss their mark. There are either too contrived, or they are not at the level of the rest of the book. I would prefer to give her 4.5 stars, as she most assuredly deserves it.
Golkree
I read the recent profile of Ms. Davis in the New Yorker and picked this as my first sampling of her writing. It is definitely worth it; her style is distinctive but not disconcerting, and the stories are all rewarding, even the really short 1-3 sentence ones. They seem intensely personal and biographical at times, but she doesn't push things too hard or too far. I will be buying and reading more of her work and wish I had known about her sooner.
Flathan
Ordered this book after reading a review in the Times in which an author recommended anything by Lydia Davis. Some stories were intriguing, but the writing was so minimal in it's style that it left me feeling somewhat cold and empty-even depressed. Still, I'm glad I read it, but probably would not read more of Ms Davis's work.
Rolorel
In a rare miscue, Amazon has plugged in the Publisher's Weekly review of a murder mystery which this collection of cutting edge fiction is anything but. This is short fiction by a rare voice. Lots of writers have done very short fiction, lots have experimented with style, few get it right like Lydia Davis. She strips the conventions of fiction down to the barest essentials, often speaking from a removed perspective. She adds just enough strokes of imagery, however, to warm it up and allow the reader to enjoy a rich experience. Davis is in total control. I highly recommend this volume to anyone who wants to know what is going on at the forefront of literary fiction. Another note: this edition, a trade paperback, is of uncommon high quality, with a cover that sports flaps like the dust jacket on a hardcover.
I haven't read the whole book, but heard the eponymous story on the radio and found it complex, unusual, and surprisingly touching.
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