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eBook Love and Garbage epub

by Ivan ( Translated from the Czech by Ewald Osers ) Klima

eBook Love and Garbage epub
  • ISBN: 0140139478
  • Author: Ivan ( Translated from the Czech by Ewald Osers ) Klima
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; New Ed edition (1991)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1406 kb
  • FB2 size 1630 kb
  • Formats docx mbr txt doc


Many compare Ivan Klima's 'Love and Garbage' to Milan Kundera's 'The Unbearable Lightness of Being'. To him the various relationships that he has are likely safety nets that keep him from the abyss that lurks beneath human existence

Many compare Ivan Klima's 'Love and Garbage' to Milan Kundera's 'The Unbearable Lightness of Being'. To him the various relationships that he has are likely safety nets that keep him from the abyss that lurks beneath human existence. His wife and lover are dual nets that keep him hanging on above it, perhaps this is one place in which the characters approach Kundera like cynicism.

Love and Garbage book. The narrator of Ivan Klima's novel has temporarily abandoned his work-in-progress -an essay on Kafka -and exchanged his writer's pen for the orange vest of a Prague road-sweeper

Love and Garbage book. The narrator of Ivan Klima's novel has temporarily abandoned his. The narrator of Ivan Klima's novel has temporarily abandoned his work-in-progress -an essay on Kafka -and exchanged his writer's pen for the orange vest of a Prague road-sweeper.

Czech title Láska a Smetí.

This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. Czech title Láska a Smetí. The excerpt from Pushkin’s ‘The Bronze Horseman’ is from the translation by Oliver Elton published by Edward Arnold & C. 1935.

Love and Garbage (orig: Láska a smetí) is a 1986 novel by Czech writer Ivan Klíma

Love and Garbage (orig: Láska a smetí) is a 1986 novel by Czech writer Ivan Klíma. Banned from publishing in the Czechoslovakia while the country was under Soviet influence, but after the end of the cold war in 1989, the novel was rushed into print in his home country, selling over 100,000 copies. The novel uses a first person narrative to explore the suffering and challenges of a dissident artist forced to be a trash collector in Communist Prague.

Читать онлайн Love and Garbage.

I The woman in the office told me to go to the locker room: I was to wait there. So I set out across the court to a door which bore the notice LOCKERS. Читать онлайн Love and Garbage.

Ivana Bozděchová translated Ewald Osers‘ memoirs into Czech. I spent all my childhood holidays in Austria and I love the mountains

Ivana Bozděchová translated Ewald Osers‘ memoirs into Czech. She remembers her friend. I am very grateful to Ewald Osers that he introduced me to this great gentleman of Czech poetry. I spent all my childhood holidays in Austria and I love the mountains. I was a skier until aged 72. Then my cardiologist said it was time for me to hang up my skis. I regret having followed his advice to this day. I always went skiing in the Austrian Tyrol and I love it. I feel at home in Prague for a limited period.

Get book recommendations, fiction, poetry, and dispatches from the world of literature in your in-box. It’s a relief to discover, from Prince Harry’s recently resurfaced Lion King clip, that even royals are a little bit grasping and loserish. But they are, in the end, still royals.

From an internationally acclaimed Czech writer comes a shrewd, humane, and poignant novel, set in Prague before the Velvet Revolution, whose perceptions about love, conscience, and betrayal cut to the bone of life in both totalitarian and democratic societies. A chilling story from the underground.

A chilling story from the underground.

Page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
Comments: (7)
Anaginn
I find Ivan Klima one of the great writers of our time - He's Czech, and always reveals how life
was/is in this part of the world. Also, I love his liberal politics!
Yayrel
Suppose you spent a lot of your childhood in a Nazi concentration camp, then got out only to find your country taken over by a lot of idiots with party cards who proceeded to Orwellize everything. Idiocy became excellence and excellence just suspicious lack of patriotism. The less you knew, the more qualified you became. And you wanted to write. What would you do ? Would you run away ? But what if your language was spoken by only ten million people in the whole world ? If you left, you'd be read only in translation--through that glass darkly. Well, you opt to stay. But the idiots--shall we call them `jerkists' ?---don't want to give you any recognition. So, you can collect garbage off the streets with a team of oddball companions and you can assuage your circumscribed little life, your frustrations in literature by having a steamy affair with a rather mysterious woman. Ah, but you're married too, with two kids. So, trapped you are. Isn't almost everyone, everywhere, ultimately trapped in a life they didn't imagine ? At least they are in our world, where choice is a possibility.

In a nutshell, this is Klima's autobiography and the dilemma of this strange but beautiful novel. I couldn't help but recall Milan Kundera here, even if Klima is probably sick and tired of the comparison. Philosophy plays a big role, plot takes a back seat. Adultery figures large in both writers' work, as it does in Skvorecky's as well. I think it is because in 20th century Czechoslovakia, living meant being in bed with somebody else; you could never be true to one thing. "Sleeping with the enemy" became a common metaphor. The enemy could be yourself. Klima writes that "the most important things in life are non-communicable, not compressible into words...even though he himself tries to do so." Yes, the whole book reverberates with the battle between being true to yourself and being true to the duties you have by being alive, being part of a social fabric, especially one that is odious to you. I'm not sure the battle is won by the end. Nor is it lost. It just goes on. Kafka has to appear, Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge, the philosophy of garbage, and the idea that we are tied to life by countless threads which form a net for us, but we break them, others break them, and they slowly rot away, leaving us, at last, alone. Love must be paramount---it is a strong thread, while garbage is dangerous, a rotting agent, especially discarded ideas that still hang around (like Communism in the old Czechoslovakia.) If you read this novel, you must be interested in such thoughts, Klima's many epigrams, and his musings on many subjects. You will find a very clear presentation of the dilemmas of adultery. There are some humorous passages. But it's most of all the tracing of one man's very human struggle with the givens of life--marriage, government, authority of any kind, nature, and love---that will keep you reading to the end. It is not a pop literature novel chockfull of extremes; it is quiet, but it is brilliant.
Tam
Many compare Ivan Klima's 'Love and Garbage' to Milan Kundera's 'The Unbearable Lightness of Being'. Although there are many comparable elements between these two excellent novels, it must be said that 'Love and Garbage' has much more of a real human soul to it. Where Kundera's characters tend to be shallow and cold, Klima's have a warmth and realism that will draw in readers.

Even though the narrator is having an affair with a sculptress named Daria, we never see him as a calous womaniser, or anything of the sort. He is merely, like any human being, trying to find the person that will make him whole and keep him form the void.

Escaping the aforementioned central void is soemthing that obsesses Klima's narrator. To him the various relationships that he has are likely safety nets that keep him from the abyss that lurks beneath human existence. His wife and lover are dual nets that keep him hanging on above it, perhaps this is one place in which the characters approach Kundera like cynicism.

However 'Love and Garbage' does not restrict itself to matters of love and runs ts reader throught the gauntlet that is the human experience. Life is viewed from many different ages and viewpoints through the narrator, his wife, his children, his lover and his aging and unwell father. This is all set against the background of the loathsome, totalitarian regime of the time, as well as its "jerkish" traditions and language. The result is a fascinating examination of the human condition.
Perius
As with his other writing--essays, short stories, other novels--Klima mixes lots of pondering with a slow-moving, at times suspended, plot. He favors thinking about Kafka, Kampuchea, the Bomb, garbage, and corrosion of the moral and physical type. It takes a very slow accretion of these reflections, alternating with the narrator's work on a sanitation crew, the decline of his father's health, his marriage and his mistress, and his own impotence as--you guessed it, a writer..to emerge into what manages to be an appropriate ending to this reflective, meditative narrative.
I like Klima's refusal to give into the cliche, the accepted role, and his determination to peer over into the abyss: the quality he fears and admires in his predecessor Kafka. As with most of his work, you find out less about the streets of Prague than his inner labyrinthine intellect. I do wish, however, that Klima could break out of his familiar narratorial role: his protagonist always seems like himself, despite at the novel's start a disclaimer. Which is wise, considering Klima's faithful rendition of a love triangle that motivates what plot that exists to thread the multiple digressions and sub-plots along. His account of infidelity certainly carries the whole theme of lies and decay forward and grounds the novel in its elaborations.
Actually, the garbage crew proves the least interesting part of this novel, and the relationship between him and his wife and his mistress the most engrossing--I expected to be excited by just the opposite motif! Klima comments elsewhere that he took on the garbageman job as "research" for a novel. On the other hand, under the communist regime, he may not have had many alternatives. See "My Golden Trades" for some of his other tasks.
More admirable than Kundera, in my opinion, is Klima's moral stance; you can read his interview with Philip Roth in Klima's essay collection "Spirit of Prague" to understand more about how the two Czechs differ in their decisions. For readers willing to be moved more by insight than titillation, this is a fine place to begin your introduction to Klima's world.
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