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eBook Cold Comfort Farm epub

by Stella Gibbons

eBook Cold Comfort Farm epub
  • ISBN: 0586038612
  • Author: Stella Gibbons
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; New edition edition (January 1973)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1643 kb
  • FB2 size 1416 kb
  • Formats lit lrf lrf txt


STELLA DOROTHEA GIBBONS, novelist, poet and short-story writer, was born in London in 1902. She went to the North London Collegiate School and studied journalism at University College London

STELLA DOROTHEA GIBBONS, novelist, poet and short-story writer, was born in London in 1902. She went to the North London Collegiate School and studied journalism at University College London. She then worked for ten years on various papers, including the Evening Standard. Her first publication was a book of poems, The Mountain Beast (1930), and her first novel, Cold Comfort Farm (1932), won the Femina Vie Heureuse Prize for 1933.

Gibbons wrote Cold Comfort Farm while working for on the books pages of the Lady. Inspired, or perhaps provoked, by the fashion for novels set in remote rustic villages about sensitive young men with names like Micah, she set about demolishing a piece of treasured literary real estate whose origins can be traced to the late-Victorian novels of Thomas Hardy (No 29 in this series)

Cold Comfort Farm is a comic novel by English author Stella Gibbons, published in 1932.

Cold Comfort Farm is a comic novel by English author Stella Gibbons, published in 1932. Following the death of her parents, the book's heroine, Flora Poste, finds she is possessed "of every art and grace save that of earning her own living".

For she struck suddenly, fiercely, upon the little bell that stood ever at her elbow (at least, it was at her elbow whenever she sat in that particular chair).

For she struck suddenly, fiercely, upon the little bell that stood ever at her elbow (at least, it was at her elbow whenever she sat in that particular chair) days, and had even hinted at to Seth, had suddenly matured. The shrill sound leapt through the tepid air of the room. It roused Judith, who was standing at the window looking with sodden eyes at the inexorable fecundity of the advancing spring. I mun go downstairs,’ said the old woman. Mothe. ou’re mistaken. Tes not the first o’ May nor the seventeenth o’ October

Penguin Classics Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons (Nov 28 2006). Her first publication was a book of poems The Mountain Beast (1930) and her first novel Cold Comfort Farm (1932) won the Femina Vie Heuruse Prize for 1933

Penguin Classics Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons (Nov 28 2006). Her first publication was a book of poems The Mountain Beast (1930) and her first novel Cold Comfort Farm (1932) won the Femina Vie Heuruse Prize for 1933. Amongst her other novels are Miss Linsey and Pa (1936), Nightingale Wood (1938), Westwood (1946), Conference at Cold Comfort Farm (1959) and Beside the Pearly Water (1954).

Cold Comfort Farm, published in 1932, pokes gentle fun at the sub-genre of novels that dwells on misery and melodrama on English farms. Early versions of this genre include the works of Thomas Hardy and of course Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. She’s a great fan of Jane Austen, and not at all a fan of getting a job

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Gibbons Stella d. ate.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. te: 2004-04-02 d. citation: 1932 d. dentifier: Librarian, Rashtrapati Bhavan d. dentifier. origpath: /data d. copyno: 1 d.

In Gibbons's classic tale, a resourceful young heroine finds herself in the gloomy, overwrought world .

In Gibbons's classic tale, a resourceful young heroine finds herself in the gloomy, overwrought world of a Hardy or Bronte novel and proceeds to organize everyone out of their romantic tragedies into the pleasures of normal life. Flora Poste, orphaned at 19, chooses to live with relatives at Cold Comfort Farm in Sussex, where cows are named Feckless, Aimless, Pointless, and Graceless, and the proprietors, the dour Starkadder family, are tyrannized by Flora's mysterious aunt, who controls the household from a locked room

Quite simply one of the funniest satirical novels of the last century. Nancy Pearl, NPR's "Morning Edition"? Delicious . . . "Cold Comfort Farm" has the sunniness of a P. G. Wodehouse and the comic aplomb of Evelyn Waugh's "Scoop". "The Independent" (London) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. Cold Comfort Farm (Unabridged) by Stella Gibbons In Gibbons's classic tale, a resourceful young heroine finds herself in the gloomy, overwrought world of a Hardy or Bronte novel and proceeds to organize everyone out of their romantic tragedies into the pleasures of normal life. Flora Poste, orphaned at 19, chooses to live with relatives at Cold Comfort Farm in Sussex, where cows are named Feckless, Aimless, Pointless, and Graceless, and the proprietors, the dour Starkadder family, are tyrannized by Flora's mysterious aunt, who controls the household from a locked room. Once there she discovers they exist in a state of chaos and feels it is up to her to bring order. Flora's confident and clever management of an alarming cast of eccentrics is only half the pleasure of this novel. The other half is Gibbons's wicked sendup of romantic cliches, from the mad woman in the attic to the druidical peasants with their West Country accents and mystical herbs.
Comments: (7)
Dainris
This is highly edited version of the book -- cuts it almost in half. I evidently didn't notice when I ordered that it is abridged..The book itself does not say it is abridged or edited. The original book is wonderful -- this version isn't. It reads at maybe 4th grade level. It deletes a whole lot (1/2 of the book worth) of the fun details that make the book interesting to read. After deleting 1/2 of the book, the "editor" then rewrote what was left. It's really appalling that this is sold under the original title with no explanation of the butchering that was done to the story. I'll probably throw it away so no one else has to read it, even by mistake.
Wenyost
A charming and amusing book. Perfect for just relaxing! Gibbons pokes fun at the heavily romantic, sweat-and-furrow writing popular in the 1920s. She contrasts town mouse Flora's pragmatic outlook with the Heathcliffish fatalism of her pastoral cousins, the Starkadders.
There are a few caveats. Readers don't get to witness Flora's confrontation with Aunt Ada--the apex of the story. Readers are also deprived of how the love story develops between Flora and Charles. One minute, she "quite likes him," and the next, she plans to marry him.
My third objection is that ALL the Starkadders and their neighbors are painted so stupid. Surely, among such a large group, someone would have a bit of brain, but Gibbons is content to merely typecast them. After you finish laughing, the prejudice shows through clearly, and you feel tainted.
Gold Crown
Classic comedy from the last century that is still laugh out loud funny today. Big City girl goes to the country to live amongst very weird kith and kin and, primarily, to stir the pot and get them all out of their dull routines. Does she succeed? You'll have to read the book. WARNING: Don't drink coffee or any other staining beverage while reading this novel. Consequences from spontaneous outbursts could be disastrous.

And if you think it's easy to get on the good side of Aunt Ada Doom, or big Business (the bull), or Viper (the horse), or even Adam who prefers to wash dishes with a stick, then you've got another think coming. Outrageous? Yes. And intended to be a great 20th C. send-up of the 19th C. "loam and lovechild novels" such as "Tess of the D'Urbervilles," the writing style of D H Lawrence, and plots and styles of lesser known novelists about English lovers of the soil and their invariably wronged women.

Sadly, Ms. Gibbons hilariously poisonous pen has proven inadequate to the task of wiping out the overwrought romance fiction heroes with thick regional accents and the perpetually pneumatic heroines of today. The world of 21st C. fiction needs another Stella Gibbons.
Natety
It helps to know a little bit about English LIterature of the 19th century, but even without that background this story will keep you in stitches. I kept wanting to pigeonhole everyone I knew and read them quotes. Gibbons has a wonderful knack for finding just the right way to show up the ridiculousness in every character. On the one hand, the characters seem familiar and "types" but on the other hand, Gibbons gives them quirks and twists that make them stand out from all their predecessors in English Literature. From the names of the cows, to the repeating of stock phrases like "Something nasty in the woodshed," the author has a wonderfully original way of using the language.
Dorizius
I feel Stella Gibbons was a kindred spirit. My favorite literature teacher once said that one either loves the Bronte sisters or Jane Austen--nobody truly loves both. She was right. If you think you do love both, then it is because you have only watched film versions of Jane Austen (which are often MIS-interpreted as Bronte stories, like the 2005 movie version of Pride & Prejudice). You either love the Gothic, angst ridden, moody atmosphere of the Brontes or you love the bright, witty, virtue affirming world of Austen. Stella Gibbons was without a doubt an Austen fan.

Gibbons had read the novels of Thomas Hardy, the Brontes, D. H. Lawrence and others that were popular in her day, and had found them too dark and depressing for her taste. What these novels needed was for a character to intervene in behalf of these brooding characters and fix what was ailing in these mentally disturbed families. Flora Poste is Gibbons' answer. Flora sweeps in and fixes all that ails the Starkadder family, with amusing results. This novel will appeal to all readers who find the current trends in popular romance literature (and movies) to be too dark and unrealistic for their taste. It may also be a bracing corrective for those who have been carried along unaware of what was missing in today's literary world.

If you enjoy Cold Comfort Farm, try reading Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey. That was Austen's parody of the Gothic literature that was popular in her own time.
Gabar
I bought this book based on the fact that I own the movie based on the book "Cold Comfort Farm" by the author. It only had one short story about the farm; all the others were separate stories with different people. Most of the stories ended with cliff-hangers. It was up to the reader to supply the ending. I'm not crazy about this style of writing, but Stella Gibbons does a good job of keeping you interested enough to finish the story and then figure out the ending you would like.
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