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eBook The Scheme for Full Employment: A Novel epub

by Magnus Mills

eBook The Scheme for Full Employment: A Novel epub
  • ISBN: 0312310293
  • Author: Magnus Mills
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador (December 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • ePUB size: 1665 kb
  • FB2 size 1676 kb
  • Formats doc lrf azw mobi


The Scheme for Full Employment is a novel by the English author Magnus Mills, published in 2003 by Flamingo.

The Scheme for Full Employment is a novel by the English author Magnus Mills, published in 2003 by Flamingo. The scheme referred to in the title involves the driving of "UniVans" from depot to depot picking up and unloading cargo - the cargo being replacement parts for UniVans. Gloriously self-perpetuating, the scheme was designed to give an honest day’s wage for an honest day’s labour", "the envy of the world: the greatest undertaking ever conceived by man".

We thought it up. The Scheme for Full Employment was the envy of the world: the greatest undertaking ever conceived by men and women

We thought it up. The Scheme for Full Employment was the envy of the world: the greatest undertaking ever conceived by men and women. It solved at a stroke the problem that had beset humankind for generations. Participants had only to put the wheels in motion, and they could look forward to a bright, sunlit upland where idleness and uncertainty would be banished for ever. Planned to the finest detail by people of vision, The Scheme was watertight, and could not possibly go wrong. Except in this country.

Magnus Mills is the author of the story collection Screwtop Thompson and six novels, including The Restraint of Beasts, which won the McKitterick Prize and was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread (now the Costa) First Novel Award in 1999.

Start by marking The Scheme for Full Employment: A Novel  .

Start by marking The Scheme for Full Employment: A Novel as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Gloriously self-perpetuating, the Scheme was From Magnus Mills, the acknowledged master of the working-class dystopic parable-a genre he practically invented-a new work of comic genius. The book returns to Mills’s signature theme – the world of working class employment; in this case it also feels like an allegory for the 1970s, the world of unions and arcane employment disputes and procedures as well as the rise of Thatcherism – the narrator and others are shocked by the appearance of a female inspector who dares to question the very.

Gloriously self-perpetuating, the Scheme was designed to give an honest day's wage for an honest day's labor.

From Magnus Mills, the acknowledged master of the working-class dystopic parable-a genre he practically invented-a new work of comic genius Univans. Gloriously self-perpetuating, the Scheme was designed to give an honest day's wage for an honest day's labor. That it produces nothing does not obtain.

Magnus Mills's admirers, then (of whom I am one), will be delighted that his new novel bears a strong family. Now, this could be read allegorically.

Magnus Mills's characters are typically to be found slogging away up to their thighs in. .

Magnus Mills's characters are typically to be found slogging away up to their thighs in sludge in some rain-sodden field; and this is one reason why his writing burst on the world a few years back with something like the scandal of the first literary portrayals of incest or sodomy. In Mills's first novel, The Restraint of Beasts, the pint-guzzling, verbally challenged Scots Tam and Richie - Mills's answer to Beckett's Vladimir and Estragon - spend most of the book doing nothing more philosophically profound than building a high-tensile fence across a godforsaken stretch of soggy field.

The Scheme for Full Employment.

Daily we stumble over shale and flint, toiling onwards in the vague belief that at some distant time and place we’ll see the sun rise again; and that spreading before us will be vast, hospitable ranges where the mules may finally be turned loose. It is the beginning of the century, and two teams of explorers are racing across a cold, windswept, deserted land to reach the furthest point from civilisation. The award-winning, Booker and Goldsmiths Prize-shortlisted author Magnus Mills is back with his best novel yet, a hilarious and surreal exploration of power, fanaticism and really, really good records. The Scheme for Full Employment.

From Magnus Mills, the acknowledged master of the working-class dystopic parable--a genre he practically invented--a new work of comic geniusThe whole idea is simple yet so perfect: men drive to and from strategically placed warehouses in Univans--identical and serviceable vehicles--transporting replacement parts for. . .Univans. Gloriously self-perpetuating, the Scheme was designed to give an honest day’s wage for an honest day’s labor. That it produces nothing does not obtain. Our hero in Magnus Mills’ mesmerizing new work is a five-year veteran of the Scheme: he knows the best routes, the easiest managers, the quickest ways in and out. Inevitably, trouble begins to brew. A woman arrives on the scene. Some workers develop delivery sidelines. And most disturbing of all, not all participants are in agreement. There are “Flat-Dayers,” who believe the Scheme’s eight-hour day is sacrosanct and inviolable, and there are “Swervers,” who fancy being let off a little early now and again. Disagreement turns to argument, argument to debate, debate to outright schism. Soon the Flat-Dayers and Swervers have pushed the Scheme to the very brink of disaster. . .and readers to the edge of their chairs in delight.
Comments: (7)
Dagdalas
Mills has created a masterpiece in The Scheme For Full Employment. 'The Scheme' unfolds quickly in this short story and an amusing twist lies beneath the day to day drudgery of the characters' work. When you start to find out more you find yourself wondering how many similar 'Schemes' might exist in our society today...

I read it in an afternoon and became totally engrossed from the first page on. The author's attention to detail is fantastic although find yourself reaching the end and realizing that you know more or less nothing about the characters other than their names and their role in The Scheme... all part of the genius

This is a fantastic, bite-size read and the sort of book that you can pluck out and talk to people about to guarantee a laugh. It even looks good on the shelf!

Well worth buying along with anything else by Mills
Zepavitta
I just love Magnus Mills. I read his first (and best) book The Restraint of Beasts a few weeks ago and have hungrilly read the others since. This one The Scheme.. is a clever mickey-take on our public sectors (civil service and councils) which of course are paid for by taxes from the productive private sector. Politicians in our real world are always trying to cut back/down-size the public sector as many facets of it are just money pits. I work in the private sector and for a while our attitudes mirrored those in The Scheme and we nearly went under. We changed, lost people, became efficient and survived and competed in the private market. What Mills shows us here is how, with the lack of private competition, these people just can't change. They'll strike if the beurocrats downsize, strike if they're asked to work a full day etc. This is why Thatcher in the eighties was privatizing left, right and centre-work and produce or go under. Give us value for money for our taxes. Oh yes, the politicians know about the attitudes behind The Scheme. This is a very clever book. My only gripe was it just wasn't as entertaining as his first two books. It's all very well being clever but I really would like more fun, hence just the three stars this time. I didn't like the comment by the narrator about the two different sides- The Full- Dayers (those that want to work a full day) and The Early Swervers (those that want to slope off early) saying they were bickering and hence blaming both of them instead of just The Early Swervers- It's a bit like blaming two boys for fighting when one had been picking on the other. But I did like how after the strike, certain people obviously realised The Scheme wasn't needed. I know we've had redundancies at my work when certain people have been off sick a long time and have not been missed at all, you just think 'what are they for? Why do we need them? Yes, a very clever book but light on the entertainment side.
Direbringer
All throughout the country, men are driving UniVans (filled with, you guessed it, UniVan parts) to and from warehouses and getting paid for their time in what is known as The Scheme for Full Employment (or just "the Scheme"). A cute self perpetuating welfare system, the Scheme has been working fine for three decades (except for UniVans constantly clogging city traffic). But now, told through the perspective of a five-year Schemer (who I don't believe is ever named), the Scheme is falling apart. One Schemer, George, is trafficking decorated cakes (can anyone say "drugs"?). Some workers are pushing for early swerves (getting off early). In response, other workers start campaigning as "flat-dayers" (8 hours work for 8 hours pay). The two groups clash antagonisticly but nonviolently, only to be crushed (and the Scheme too) once and for all by, yes again you guessed it -- a woman.
I had some trouble deciding whether to give THE SCHEME FOR FULL EMPLOYMENT two stars or three, but finally decided on three because the book was delightfully easy to read and without unneccesary verbiage. This little novel has a singular purpose and is also devoid of subplots, home scenes, and anything else beyond the scope of the Scheme. Our narrator's belief in the Scheme allows for a deadpan sort of humor that isn't terribly funny, but does coax a few smiles. The narrator never joins either the early-swervers or the flat-dayers, but gets sucked up by the self corruption just the same. And the portrayal of the supervisors and their behavior is good enough to earn the third star all by itself.
While not great literature or even a good mystery, THE SCHEME FOR FULL EMPLOYMENT is a lightly entertaining, tongue-in-cheek poke at the welfare system.
Black_Hawk_Down
Once more, Magnus Mills demonstrates his insight into the psyche of the ordinary working man.

The novel takes social engineering to an ultimate level of success in providing full employment, routine and boring though it may be. Men are employed to drive univans from warehouse to warehouse, transporting replacement parts for--univans. At the warehouses, others are employed in loading and unloading the vans, maintaining them as well as in supervising the lot of workers.

The novel is narrated by an unnamed driver who suffers occasional frustration with a partner who disrupts schedules to deliver cakes for extra income. Along the way, the whole scheme begins to unravel as some workers (known as early-swervers) seek to work less than a full day and come into conflict with those designated flat-dayers. The sudden appearance of a woman supervisor appears to be another wrench in the system, but her presence is never fully developed.

Trouble escalates as a strike brings everything to a shuddering halt and a rumor circulates that a group of "enthusiasts" have approached management and offered to drive the vans on an unpaid, voluntary basis.

Unfortunately, this book lacks the verve of "The Restraint of Beasts" and--despite its short length--I had to force myself to finish it. The black humor which made "The Restraint of Beasts" a joy to read is lacking in this novel. And, rather than coming to a conclusion, it just fizzles out.
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