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eBook The End of the Alphabet epub

by CS Richardson

eBook The End of the Alphabet epub
  • ISBN: 0385663412
  • Author: CS Richardson
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Dramas & Plays
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor Canada; later printing edition (January 8, 2008)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • ePUB size: 1803 kb
  • FB2 size 1186 kb
  • Formats azw lit rtf txt


CS Richardson has worked in publishing for more than twenty years. The married couple around which The End of the Alphabet is centered are interesting, but one never gets attached to them, nor really cares about their plight.

CS Richardson has worked in publishing for more than twenty years. He has received the Alcuin Award (Canada’s highest honor for excellence in book design) several times, and lectures frequently on various facets of publishing, design, and communication. He lives in Toronto, Canada. Reading about the little bits of pieces of their personalities carries the novel, yet the characterization doesn't meet any decent expectations. The premise is wonderful, the theme of the alphabet unique.

Ambrose Zephyr would sometimes remark that a better man was one supplied with an intelligent woman, the ability to tango and an able tailor. anation for why Ambrose Zephyr had stroked out Jaipur on his list and pencilled in Old Jewry. Mr Umtata sailed from home a younger man, stowed away in the hold of a runt freighter. When the authorities realized he was gone, he wasn’t missed. Good riddance, they said. On the day the freighter docked in London, Germany was invading its neighbours.

Praise for The End of the Alphabet. Think of the long trip home. Should we have stayed at home and thought of here. Where should we be today?

Praise for The End of the Alphabet. For Rebecc. MD. Where should we be today? ELIZABETH BISHOP, ‘Questions of Travel’. AZ. ZA. This story is unlikely. Were it otherwise, or at the least more wished for, it would have begun on a Sunday morning. Early, as that was his best time of the day, and in April, that odd time between a thin winter and a plump spring.

In the tradition of romantic legend and fable, The End of the Alphabet is a lovingly rendered, richly nuanced . As an award-winning book designer and now author, CS Richardson has worked in publishing for over twenty years.

In the tradition of romantic legend and fable, The End of the Alphabet is a lovingly rendered, richly nuanced treatise on the nature of true and enduring love. The story of Ambrose and Zappora is a precious gift, one that illuminates a pathway to the return of balance and joy after unthinkable loss. He is a multiple recipient of the Alcuin Award (Canada's highest honour for excellence in book design) and his work has been exhibited at both the Frankfurt and Leipzig Book Fairs. The End of the Alphabet, his first novel, has been sold in ten countries.

Richardson zigzags between the present and the past as Ambrose and . Each stop evokes different memories, dif The End of the Alphabet is what I would call a huggable book.

Richardson zigzags between the present and the past as Ambrose and Zipper zip from place to place. But en route to Elba, Zipper wants to hop off the train at Paris. She’s not tired of Paris. I imagine this tactic might not work for everyone, but CS Richardson certainly owns the style with flair. Ambrose Zephyr is a fifty year old, happily married Londoner. But then he is diagnosed with an unidentified terminal illness and given only a month to live.

Charles Scott Richardson (born 1955 in Regina, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian novelist, and book designer. His novel, The End of the Alphabet, won the 2008 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best first Book, Canada & the Caribbean. He has won the Alcuin Society Award multiple times. He is Vice President, and Creative Director at Random House of Canada. Richardson on Book Design, The Casual Optimist, March 9, 2009.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Ambrose Zephyr and his wife Zappora Ashkenazi (Zipper) have achieved a happy and balanced life together. She is the yin to his yang. He is the only man she has loved without adjustment

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. He is the only man she has loved without adjustment. The two live contentedly in a narrow London terrace full of books. That contentment is thrown into turmoil on or about Ambroses fiftieth birthday, when they receive the news that he has contracted a mysterious illness that will most certainly lead to his death within the month. In panicked delirium, from beneath their bed Ambrose withdraws an oxblood suitcase containing the.

Ambrose Zephyr and his wife Zappora Ashkenazi ("Zipper") have achieved a happy and balanced life together.

Ambrose Zephyr and his wife Zappora Ashkenazi (“Zipper”) have achieved a happy and balanced life together. She is the yin to his yang. He is the only man she has loved without adjustment. The two live contentedly in a narrow London terrace full of books.That contentment is thrown into turmoil on or about Ambrose’s fiftieth birthday, when they receive the news that he has contracted a mysterious illness that will most certainly lead to his death within the month. In panicked delirium, from beneath their bed Ambrose withdraws an oxblood suitcase containing the ephemera of his long-suppressed life’s ambition: to travel the world in a pilgrimage through the alphabet, from Amsterdam to Zanzibar. Scuttling the responsibilities of their respectably successful careers, the two set off on an urgent voyage through real and imagined geographies of place, of history, of art, and of love.Zipper is continually frustrated by Ambrose’s reticence, but loves him beyond all measure. And Ambrose well appreciates his miraculous good fortune in having Zipper by his side, drawing out the best in him. Zipper does not completely understand Ambrose’s compulsion to pursue his childhood dream, but her commitment to him is absolute and so she, too, is compelled to make this journey.In Amsterdam, they revisit past debates on beauty and art. In Berlin, they weigh the burdens of history. In the glow of the Chartres windows, they explore the stations of life. In Deauville, they fondly recall their youthful love. At “E,” Ambrose adjusts his long-drafted itinerary, crossing out Elba and replacing it with the Eiffel Tower of Zipper’s beloved Paris, the city of their first predestined encounter. While resting in Florence beside the youthfully vital David, they meet a chivalrous old man who shares his insight into enduring romance. It is in Giza that Ambrose begins to falter as he climbs a pyramid, and they miss Haifa thanks to a sandstorm. In Istanbul, they realize that Ambrose can go no further and they must return to their London terrace. But their voyage is not over. The two continue their odyssey, no longer via plane and rail, but now through the power of shared desire and love. The wise words of a hallucinatory camel in Ambrose’s fevered dream ring out to them with equanimity: “Why, you ask? There is no why, Master Zephyr. Life goes on. Death goes on. Love goes on. It is all as simple as that.”In the tradition of romantic legend and fable, The End of the Alphabet is a lovingly rendered, richly nuanced treatise on the nature of true and enduring love. The story of Ambrose and Zappora is a precious gift, one that illuminates a pathway to the return of balance and joy after unthinkable loss.From the Hardcover edition.
Comments: (7)
Diredefender
It's hard to gather any sympathy for characters that are abstractly drawn and hopelessly treacly. The saving grace of this wisp of a novel (a mere 119 pages) is the quirky habits and details that make people human. The descriptions of the various locales around the world are mediocre at best - the author doesn't present any new visuals for places that conjure up grandeur. We are talking Venice, Turkey, Holland, and Egypt. There is plenty to say about these countries, yet the author barely manages to describe the areas with aplomb. The married couple around which The End of the Alphabet is centered are interesting, but one never gets attached to them, nor really cares about their plight. Reading about the little bits of pieces of their personalities carries the novel, yet the characterization doesn't meet any decent expectations. The premise is wonderful, the theme of the alphabet unique. It just wasn't carried out well enough.
Snake Rocking
From fellow novelist, albeit first novel from small press, I so admire the unique way you set about telling this story. The understated narrative overflows with emotion and wonderous language. Sensory journey to please any book lover. Something I work at in my writing too. Bravo. Hope you win a prize, it's beautiful. Sarah Collins Honenberger (if you liked the friendship in White Lies: A Tale of Babies, Vaccines, and Deception, you like The End of the Alphabet about the friendship between a husband and wife.
inform
This is a wonderful, poignant, loving and poignant little jewel of a book. Beware, it will make you weep. I give it 5 tissue boxes rather than stars!
Shak
Far from a page turner. Other readers have rated this book quite highly. Other than dealing with a man who has 30 days to live, I didn't find anything invigorating.
Kardana
This is one of the best books I have read. The prose is spare and clever. The story keeps the reader engaged on every page. I am a sucker for thoughtful love stories.
Hiylchis
The more I read the more poetic it felt. I will recommend it to all my friends who enjoy reading.
Zulurr
I did not choose this book it was for book club. Definitely not a favorite. Felt it never had a climax. Boring.
I was excited to read it when I read a review for the author's follow up book, so I thought I would start with this one. I agree with some other readers that I couldn't connect with the main character. The story was too short, and it felt like the author got bored and wanted to finish it up quickly towards the end. Not worth the $11 I paid for it.
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