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eBook The King's Daughters (The Prince Amir Mystery Series) epub

by Nathalie Mallet

eBook The King's Daughters (The Prince Amir Mystery Series) epub
  • ISBN: 1597801356
  • Author: Nathalie Mallet
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Night Shade Books (July 1, 2008)
  • ePUB size: 1973 kb
  • FB2 size 1304 kb
  • Formats lrf doc lrf rtf


Series: The Prince Amir Mystery Series (Book 2). Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages

Series: The Prince Amir Mystery Series (Book 2). Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages. Publisher: Night Shade Books (July 1, 2008). King's daughters was an entertaining read about Southern prince Amir travelling north to the homeland of his lovely fiancée Eva. Once they arrive, things start to go wrong, and Amir's reception is anything but friendly. Aided by Milo- his Eunach servant (love the character by the way), he traverses the difficult political minefield of this inhospitable country and encounters a strange mystery. The queen appears to be ill- has she been poisoned? And who is kidnapping the King's daughters?

The second book in the series, The King’s Daughters, is scheduled for 2008.

The second book in the series, The King’s Daughters, is scheduled for 2008. The Prince Amir Mystery Series. The Princes of the Golden Cage (2007)(. The King's Daughters (summer 2009). Death in the Traveling City (summer 2011).

The "Prince Amir" Series by Nathalie Mallet: The Princes of the Golden Cage. The King's Daughters. Death in the Traveling City (forthcoming).

The King's Daughters book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The King's Daughters (The Prince Amir Mystery Series Book 2) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Far to the north of the hot desert land of Telfar lies the frozen kingdom of Sorvinka. Prince Amir has traveled there, leaving his sultanate in the hands of his half-brother Erik as he seeks to ask the king, the father of the beautiful Princess Eva, for her hand in marriage. But Sorvinka has grown dangerous during Princess Eva's absence, as she and Amir discover to their terror, when their force of guards and eunuchs is cut down by ruthless brigands. And upon their arrival, their welcome to Eva's family stronghold is as bitterly cold as the land itself.

The King's Daughters, part two of the Prince Amir series, tells a self-contained story at a good clip, while carrying the development of its protagonist forward into the build up to the next book. A well-crafted, pleasurable experience. I look forward to book 3, Death in the Traveling City. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. In the Kingdom of Telfar, Prince Amir survived the deaths of much of his family during a bloody war. He still has hopes for his and his sultanate's future if he can persuade his beloved Princess Eva of Sorvinka to marry him.

Prince Amir lives in a lavish and beautiful cage. Living under constant threat of death at the hands of his scheming brothers, Amir has chosen a life of solitude and study. But his scholarly and alchemical pursuits bring him under suspicion when, one by one, his brothers are struck down by darkest sorcery.

The King's Daughters. Mass Market Paperback.

Nathalie Mallet is a Canadian mystery, science fiction and fantasy writer. The second book in the series, The King’s Daughters, is scheduled for 2008. She grew up in Shippagan, New Brunswick, but now resides in Prince George, British Columbia.

Prince Amir has traveled there, leaving his sultanate in the hands of his . Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Fiction & Literature‎. product description page. The King's Daughters - (Prince Amir Mystery) by Nathalie Mallet (Paperback).

Prince Amir has traveled there, leaving his sultanate in the hands of his half-brother Erik as he seeks to ask the king, the father of the beautiful Princess Eva, for her hand in marriage.

Far to the north of the hot desert land of Telfar lies the frozen kingdom of Sorvinka. Prince Amir has traveled there, leaving his sultanate in the hands of his half-brother Erik as he seeks to ask the king, the father of the beautiful Princess Eva, for her hand in marriage. But Sorvinka has grown dangerous during Princess Eva's absence, as she and Amir discover to their terror, when their force of guards and eunuchs is cut down by ruthless brigands. And upon their arrival, their welcome to Eva's family stronghold is as bitterly cold as the land itself. Accustomed to the golden cage of his upbringing, Prince Amir must navigate his way through the strange and cold-blooded customs of the Sorvinkans, and somehow find the truth behind the kidnapping of the king’s youngest daughter, the Princess Aurora, by the Sorvinkan’s traditional enemies, the neighboring Farrellians. But what can a stranger in a foreign land do?Skyhorse Publishing, under our Night Shade and Talos imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of titles for readers interested in science fiction (space opera, time travel, hard SF, alien invasion, near-future dystopia), fantasy (grimdark, sword and sorcery, contemporary urban fantasy, steampunk, alternative history), and horror (zombies, vampires, and the occult and supernatural), and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller, a national bestseller, or a Hugo or Nebula award-winner, we are committed to publishing quality books from a diverse group of authors.
Comments: (7)
Nuadabandis
Prince Amir is the fussiest SF hero I have read about. Born in a harem, he has a sense of noblesse that far exceeds his sense of oblige.
But he is well-intentioned and can be smart when forced to be.
I enjoyed the effect of removing this popinjay (admittedly, a very dangerous popinjay) from his natural environment and placing him in a society analogous to Medieval Europe.Prince Amir becomes a sort of 13th warrior in an old slavic folktale. The contrast allows us to grasp some of the weirdness inherent in the original folktales that inspired it. I can even see Prince Amir being played by a (younger) version of Antonio Banderas. So, well done there.

I have two regrets about the book -- the first is that Prince Amir's brother is not involved somehow. I think it would have been logistically difficult, but it might have been interesting to see how his brother Prince reacted to his kinsmen along with Prince Amir.
The second is that the ending rushes into an unexpected place so rapidly that it feels like a cheat. We have no indication that the resolution is culturally or factually necessary and it seems almost like a convenient dodge to ensure that the rest of Prince Amir's world will be explored (in volume 3 and perhaps beyond). It reminded me of the old Cenotaph Road series -- oops time to end this book -- on to the next one.

Although the ending felt unduly forced, there was a lot to enjoy. The dialogue and internal monologue of the main character were well-done.
Ance
King's daughters was an entertaining read about Southern prince Amir travelling north to the homeland of his lovely fiancée Eva. Once they arrive, things start to go wrong, and Amir's reception is anything but friendly. Aided by Milo- his Eunach servant (love the character by the way), he traverses the difficult political minefield of this inhospitable country and encounters a strange mystery. The queen appears to be ill- has she been poisoned? And who is kidnapping the King's daughters?

I really like the way the author writes her male characters. She has a nice touch. Amir was a bit unlikeable in the first book- but I really love him in this one. I also really like the character of Milo, the Eunach. The repartee between these comrades is really vastly entertaining. I really hope to see more of Milo and the life of the eunachs in the palace. It would be interesting for Amir to get his conciousness raised a tad about the practice of the creation of Eunachs and how they must live their lives. I am sure he thinks he had it rough in the cage. But being orphaned and turned into a Eunach slave has got to be worse. Amir could use a touch more sympathy for the sufferings of those beneath his station, and even though he is improving since last book, he still needs to eat a bit more humble pie.

The evolution of the Eva character was interesting, but also welcome. I never really cared for her that much, and well, it was a bit of a surprise. I am also glad he won't be married too soon. Marriage is the kiss of death in any fantasy series and Amir and Eva were a tad dull. I like what Eva plans to do too. That kingdom has had enough bad leaders.

I recommend this one for anyone who likes a light mystery with good character development and some thought-provoking cultural drama.
Ber
It took over half the book to settle down and start following a plot. The first book was MUCH better at pacing. The main character spent most of his time flailing around with no purpose or direction. There IS such a thing as too much mystery.
Jark
A good continuation of the story. I am glad that I made the purchase. It is not a deep story but a good read when you have some free time to kill.
Samulkree
Simply dreadful. Amateurishly written with actual grammatical mistakes. Slow, dull plot. Did she actually write the previous PRINCES book which was charming and well-told? I won't buy any of her future books. A real disappointment.
Tansino
Our second outing with the Telfarian Prince Amir brings us to the northern lands of Sorvinka, the homeland of his beloved Princess Eva. If Telfar was much like an Arabian fantasy, then Sorvinka is very much like Russian fantasy.

Many many things go wrong at the beginning of the novel. We're thrown into the the tailend of their months long journey from Telfar to Sorvinka. During their time in Sorvinka their caravan has been set upon by numerous bands of brigands who have dwindled their guards from numerous to barely seven. To top it all off Princess Livia's promise of retribution towards Amir from ruining her plans to place Erik on the throne as the new Sorvinkian King nearly gets Amir killed as a traitor--before even stepping through the gates of the castle!

Apparently, much like Telfar, there is menace afoot with the ruling family of Sorvinka. The youngest princess Aurora has gone missing, presumably kidnapped by their hated enemies, and Eva's father's new edicts are not making him popular with anyone. The book is once more told through Amir's first person POV and we get a better sense of his discomfort because of it. Used to a life of gilded luxury, even if it was within a prison, the harsh traveling conditions and icy reception as well as the brutality of Sorvinka in general have made Amir very unhappy.

I found the fact he mentions his family's legendary 'flawless profile' so very much once again rather humorous. Its annoying, but its a character trait that I think is a small detail that's often overlooked. He's arrogant and arrogant people tend to like to talk about what they consider to be their 'greatest' asset. Amir, for all his other talents, is very proud of his family's flawless profiles.

We learn more about Amir's abilities as well. A new mystery of course presents itself, but more than that we meet Khuan and Lilloth--two emissaries from the Eastern Emperor who understand what exactly is happening to Amir. He is a shal-galt, or Sorcerer Hunter (amongst other titles), and the voices he hears in his head are not him going crazy. Along with being able to see/hear them, Amir also can sense magic. Lucky him right? This is apparently something that has affected his family for years, most notably in his late brother Jafar's case.

Baba Yaga (the Russian witch) makes an appearance as well, plus enchanted animals. The romance between Amir and Eva builds, but hits obstacles as Lars--heir apparent to the throne of Sorvinka--tries to woo her as well. Amir is more trusting in this book, which may or may not be a great thing by the end of it honestly.

The problems of the first book--plot threads that lead nowhere for chapters on end, pacing, repetitiveness--aren't as bad in this second book. The plot still takes a while to truly get under way, and plot threads begin that seem to go no where or serve no real purpose. The matter of the Princess Livia's duplicity is not really addressed either. The ending seems manufactured almost as well, to find a reason to continue the series and more angst for Amir (though he doesn't need any more).

The teaser for the third book, or what will be the third book, titled Death in the Traveling City is promising. The idea of a traveling city is intriguing and I want to learn more about Khuan and Lilloth. The theme seems more Asian-inspired, which falls in line with my interests much moreso then Arabian or Russian. Overall this was still an entertaining and different read. The blend of mystery, fantasy and romance, as well as alternate history, works fairly well for the book on a whole and kept me interested throughout.
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