» » The Color of Lightning: A Novel

eBook The Color of Lightning: A Novel epub

by Paulette Jiles

eBook The Color of Lightning: A Novel epub
  • ISBN: 0061690457
  • Author: Paulette Jiles
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Reprint edition (June 15, 2010)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1846 kb
  • FB2 size 1131 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi txt lrf


Jiles never reduces her cast of characters to stock stereotypes, tackling a traumatic and tragic episode in American . Stick a thumb into any page of Paulette Jiles’s The Color of Lightning and you’ll pull out a fine prose plum. Texas Monthly on THE COLOR OF LIGHTNING).

Jiles never reduces her cast of characters to stock stereotypes, tackling a traumatic and tragic episode in American history with sensitivity and assurance. Booklist on THE COLOR OF LIGHTNING). San Antonio Express-News). A remarkably engaging story. Jiles’s description is memorable and evocative.

Stick a thumb into any page of Paulette Jiles’s The Color of Lightning and you’ll pull out a fine prose plum.

San Antonio Express-News ). A rousing, character-driven tale. Texas Monthly on THE COLOR OF LIGHTNING ).

The "Color of Lightning" is historical fiction and like the other two novels mentioned takes place in Texas after the . A superb history-based Western featuring a captivating ex-slave Black hero. Paulette Jiles is insightful and poetic in her creation of people and renderings of landscape.

The "Color of Lightning" is historical fiction and like the other two novels mentioned takes place in Texas after the Civil War. Although fiction, the novel features real individuals and events from Texas history. This novel is centered on the conflicts between white settlers and the Kiowa/Apache. The many details of life in the Great Plains just after the Civil War stud almost every page.

Other Books by Paulette Jiles. Chapter 1. WHEN THEY FIRST came into the country it was wet and raining and if they had known of the droughts that lasted for seven years at a time they might never have stayed

Other Books by Paulette Jiles. WHEN THEY FIRST came into the country it was wet and raining and if they had known of the droughts that lasted for seven years at a time they might never have stayed. They did not know what lay to the west. It seemed nobody did. Sky and grass and red earth as far as they could see. There were belts of trees in the river bottoms and the remains of old gardens where something had once been planted and harvested and then the fields abandoned. There was a stone circle at the crest of a low ridge.

A soaring work of the imagination based on oral histories of the post–Civil War years in North Texas, Paulette Jiles's The Color of Lightning is at once an intimate look into the hearts and hopes of tragically flawed human beings and a courageous reexamination of a dark American history. Скачать (pdf, . 1 Mb) Читать.

The Color of Lightning: A Novel. One of only twelve books longlisted for the 2009 Scotiabank Giller Prize-one of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards-The Color of Lightning is a beautifully rendered and unforgettable re-examination of one of the darkest periods in . Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: d: Oct 6, 2009ISBN: 9780061970993Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. Enemy Women: A Novel.

Jiles, Paulette, 1943-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The man looked around the house and barn, the washhouse and pens, saw the brush cleared along the creek. Thank you for the feed till good, said Britt

The man looked around the house and barn, the washhouse and pens, saw the brush cleared along the creek. Thank you for the feed till good, said Britt. If you want to stay to eat. I better get o. .The man fooled with the reins. My name is Vance Hamby. I knew Thornton had come home wounded. Other than that we got no word. Never hear anything out here. And you’re going by yourself. Vance Hamby sat silently for a moment and then he touched his hat brim. Well, take care, Britt.

The Color Of Lightning book. Throughout the novel, Jiles is able to show this tension between the Indians and the settlers. Once again Paulette Jiles has thoroughly engaged me with her lyrical prose and fascinating characters as she opens up a window into our conflicted and violent history. Jiles writes, The men who decided the fate of the Red Indians lived in the east, under roofs of slate and shingle.

From the Author of the National Book Award Finalist News of the World

“Meticulously researched and beautifully crafted.... This is glorious work.” — Washington Post

“A gripping, deeply relevant book.” — New York Times Book Review

 From Paulette Jiles, author of the critically acclaimed New York Times bestsellers Enemy Women and Stormy Weather, comes a stirring work of fiction set on the untamed Texas frontier in the aftermath of the Civil War. One of only twelve books longlisted for the 2009 Scotiabank Giller Prize—one of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards—The Color of Lightning is a beautifully rendered and unforgettable re-examination of one of the darkest periods in U.S. history.

Comments: (7)
Contancia
I had read "News of the World" and loved it, so maybe I had too high of expectations. I am compelled to warn other women especially during these #MeToo times that it becomes very graphic about the Indian's treatment of the women captives. For me, I could not continue reading, nor could I try to skim ahead to where it was no longer a part of the story. I had to put it down. For those who that sort of thing it would not bother them, what I had read before was good. For those who do not care for graphic descriptions of rape, I do not recommend "The Color of Lightning"
Onoxyleili
The plot is simple and in the Western tradition of a search. Britt Johnson is a strong and quietly determined ex-slave whose wife, children, and some neighbors are kidnapped by Indians. He is brave, relentless, and resourceful in tracking them down and seeking their release. The supporting characters along the way, of all races and occupations, are interesting and sufficiently rich in their particularities. Jiles clearly knows the territory and its ambience from the inside out, and nonetheless has not only rendered the narrative in poetic detail, but has meticulously researched the period so that details emerge that offer a depth of immersion into that beautifully stark and perilous time and region. The climax of the book is as beautifully crafted, poetically rich and piercingly tragic as any I have seen of its kind and stands worthily next to what Cormac McCarthy writes. Many, many examples could be cited of Jiles’s brilliant injection of moments where something turns or drops or flees, whether from a look or the body or something in the landscape.

Which leads me to my one problem with the novel. Except for some references here and there, the main character Britt Johnson not only talks with scarcely a dialect or accent or idioms of his race and culture, but he is rarely confronted with the abusive treatment that would otherwise be visited on a black man in that period. I say this as the similarly white author of Far Stones: A Novel set in the same region and time period and with African-American protagonists. I can only guess it was an authorial decision to not make an homage to a brave man complicated or distracted by the problematic issues of race. But, according to S.C. Gwynne’s EMPIRE OF THE SUMMER MOON, he was known in his region as N*****r Britt Johnson, and while highly respected and regarded, N****r was how he was known—a derogation of his personhood built in to how he was addressed—presumably regularly by those whites who truly regarded him with respect and affection. Thus, it makes him even more respectworthy that he persevered in the face of inevitable abasement—AND it means, in my view, he found some way to present himself as both not a threat to whites thereabouts and as a man of action who was of enormous help to the fragile community of settlers.

A book well, well worth the read. I simply counsel how likely even more brave and praiseworthy Britt Johnson than therein depicted.
Геракл
This is the second Paulette Jiles novel I've read. The first, "News of the World" introduced me to this wonderful writer.
I'm currently reading a third novel of hers, "Enemy Women". The "Color of Lightning" is historical fiction and like the other two novels mentioned takes place in Texas after the Civil War. Although fiction, the novel features real individuals and events from Texas history. This novel is centered on the conflicts between white settlers and the Kiowa/Apache. Without divulging the plot details it involves an Indian attack on white settlers. a kidnapping of women and children and attempted rescue. If you enjoy historical fiction you will like this well written book.
Prince Persie
A superb history-based Western featuring a captivating ex-slave Black hero. Paulette Jiles is insightful and poetic in her creation of people and renderings of landscape. The many details of life in the Great Plains just after the Civil War stud almost every page. Sure, she reminds one of Cormac McCarthy in some modes, but whereas his penchant is for concocting bizarre characters, Jiles is defter at plumbing the depths of more regular sorts of folks. This story involves Afro- and Euro-American settlers in the Southwest, the government-linked religious (in this case Quaker) groups that interfaced with the American Indians who were being displaced, abused, oppressed and culturally obliterated and the experiences of non-Indians captured by the Indians and, when young, acculturated in a way that made them (and the reader) look at "freedom" in a different way from the Ango-American norm.
The only reason I trimmed this to four stars is that I need to keep a star in case I come upon a larger, denser work by Jiles. In any event, she deserves much wider renown.
Mr.jeka
This was an excellent story. I was moved to read it after reading Jiles' News of the World. I really loved both books and their characters. The stories of Texas in the years around the Civil War were supremely interesting and moved me to also read "Captured" by Scott Zesch, which was one of Jiles' source books. It was also interesting to read of an African American living in Texas at that time. His story is based on a real person. If you like history, frontier stories, or books that leave you thinking and satisfied, try these. Reading one will make you want to read all three. I am looking forward to reading Jiles' other books.
melody of you
Excellent deeply researched novel about the Indian Wars which took place in northern Texas in the early 1870s. The story of an African American couple who flee Kentucky to avoid dangers related to the Civil War and then establish a home in Texas. The core of the book relates to the way in which the federal government tried to limit the native American Indian tribes to reservations and to persuade them to become farmers. The Indians resisted those efforts and the result was unending war in the form of raids between the two sides. Along the way some Americans were killed or captured by the Indians which them led to efforts to rescue the victims.
While the book is long and at times tedious the detailed descriptions of the raids and the lives of the captured whites among the Indians make for compelling and provocative reading.
This book is best read with the author's other excellent work "News of the World".
eBooks Related to The Color of Lightning: A Novel
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020