» » The Complete McAuslan

eBook The Complete McAuslan epub

by George MacDonald Fraser

eBook The Complete McAuslan epub
  • ISBN: 0006513719
  • Author: George MacDonald Fraser
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harpercollins Pub Ltd (January 31, 2000)
  • Pages: 608 pages
  • ePUB size: 1264 kb
  • FB2 size 1406 kb
  • Formats rtf mobi lrf lit


George MacDonald Fraser.

George MacDonald Fraser. All inquiries should be addressed to Skyhorse Publishing, 555 Eighth Avenue, Suite 903, New York, NY 10018. Skyhorse Publishing books may be purchased in bulk at special discounts for sales promotion, corporate gifts, fund-raising, or educational purposes.

George MacDonald Fraser's hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army are collected together for the first time in one volume

George MacDonald Fraser's hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army are collected together for the first time in one volume. Private McAuslan, . the Dirtiest Soldier in the World (alias the Tartan Caliban, or the Highland Division's answer to the Pekin Man) first demonstrated his unfitness for service in The General Danced at Dawn. George MacDonald Fraser.

George MacDonald Fraser OBE FRSL (2 April 1925 – 2 January 2008) was a Scottish author who wrote historical novels, non-fiction books and several screenplays. He is best known for a series of works that featured the character Flashman. Fraser was born to Scottish parents in Carlisle, England, on 2 April 1925. His father was a doctor and his mother a nurse. It was his father who passed on to Fraser his love of reading, and a passion for his Scottish heritage.

George MacDonald Fraser’s hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army - collected together for the first time in one volume. the Dirtiest Soldier in the Word (alias the Tartan Caliban, or the Highland Division’s answer to the Pekin Man) first demonstrated his unfitness for service in The General Danced at Dawn.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Complete McAuslan. 596 Kb. Mr. American.

George Macdonald Fraser uld fall out crying: 'Haw, Wully, sees a ba. From the moment when the drums beat ‘Johnnie Cope’ at sunrise until it became too dark to see in the. Evening, the steady thump-thump of a boot on a ball could be heard somewhere in the barracks.

The author of the famous Flashman Papers and the Private McAuslan stories, George MacDonald Fraser has worked on newspapers in Britain and Canada.

by George MacDonald Fraser (Author). The author of the famous Flashman Papers and the Private McAuslan stories, George MacDonald Fraser has worked on newspapers in Britain and Canada. In addition to his novels he has also written numerous films, most notably The Three Musketeers, The Four Musketeers, and the James Bond film, Octopussy. George MacDonald Fraser's hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army are collected together for the first time in one volume

The Complete McAuslan book. He continued his George MacDonald Fraser’s hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army – collected together for the first time in one volume

The Complete McAuslan book. He continued his George MacDonald Fraser’s hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army – collected together for the first time in one volume.

0000000000000 0000000000 0000000000000
Comments: (7)
Damdyagab
The fictionalized vignettes, based on some of some of the escapades and/or memories of the young George Martin Fraser, kept me hanging on every word and laughing out loud. Mr. Fraser saw active duty during WWII as a young officer but the settings for the events in the books are, for the most part, various sites where his Highland regiment was stationed post-WWII. The episode where the bagpipe loving General had scores of solders and resident native civilians– and, indeed any other participants he could coerce into joining -- dancing in a gigantic and ever-expanding Scottish reel was hilarious. The comical situations that the luckless Pvt. McAuslan – the dirtiest soldier in the British Army – got himself into and the way the author so often extracted him from those follies were beyond merely humorous. I defy anyone to try reading these books without laughing out loud. My husband kept getting curious as I laughed out loud while reading them and I’d have to read snippets to him. But when it came to the hilarious golf game in “McAuslan in the Rough” in which the hapless McAuslan had to caddy, I gave up and told my husband, an avid golfer, “Here. You’ll just have to read this yourself!” Which he did -- and also laughed out loud. If you enjoy reading mirthful situations told with droll British humor and wit, then these books are for you and I wish you happy reading.
Rrinel
Barring the fact that these are all short stories with only the thin thread of the (sometimes nearly invisible) McAuslan holding them together, this is a delightful, rueful, humorous look at what appears to be the author's thinly-veiled experiences in the British colonial forces in the immediate post WWII period. It is, as are Fraser's "Flashman" books, NOT nostalgic in a soppy way for the heroics of anyone. But there is a quiet love and respect for the dignity and uniqueness of his characters and the situations they are in. In its way, very Chekhovian human comedy - albeit a lot more raucous. Highly, highly enjoyable reading.
Morad
I always enjoyed the Flashman books, so I thought that I'd try this collection of the three books about the Highland regiment and its soldiers. It was a good choice, for the book was extremely funny and I liked it very much.

The late Mr. Fraser used his military experiences in the Highland regiment to fill three books of short tales about his service, and the people with whom he came in contact. Every character was relatively fleshed out, especially McAuslan, the "dirtiest soldier" in the regiment.
I found myself laughing out loud numerous times, even though there was a lot of language (Glaswegian and such) that I didn't quite understand, and also references to people and places that would probably be familiar to British readers, but not necessarily to Americans.

Those things aside, the stories themselves were excellent, some comic, some poignant, but always very interesting. It's obvious that Mr. Fraser cherished the memory of his time in the military, and that of the folks with whom he served. I think that you would enjoy this, if you enjoyed Flashman, as much as I did.
Goodman
"The Complete McAuslan" is an omnibus collection of the short stories originally published in the collections "The General Danced at Dawn", "McAuslan in the Rough" and "The Sheik and the Dustbin". George MacDonald Fraser based these stories on his experience as a young officer in a Highland regiment just after World War II in North Africa and Scotland (he had fought as an enlisted infantryman in Burma during the war, see his memoir "Quartered Safe Out Here"). His stories beautifully blend humor, nostalgia and insight. He describes such military milestones as facing a Selection Board ("But the thing that was universally agreed was that there was no known way of ensuring success before a Selection Board. There were no standard right answers to their questions, because their methods were all supposed to be deeply psychological. The general view throughout the Army was that they weren't fit to select bus conductors, let alone officers, but that is by the way." "Monsoon Selection Board"), facing for the first time the platoon he is to command ("Silence in the Ranks") and being dispatched to hold and defend an independent outpost ("Bo Geesty").

He recounts such varied challenges to the young officer as striving to uphold the regimental honor in an interbattalion quiz competition ("Scotsmen, of course, if they feel that national prestige is in any way at stake, tend to go out of their minds, tell them there was to be a knitting bee against England and they would be on the touch-line shouting 'Purl, Wullie! See's the chain-stich, but!" "General Knowledge, Private Information"), being put in charge of a troop train from Cairo to Jerusalem ("Night Run to Palestine") and finding himself and his platoon set with fixed bayonets and fifty rounds apiece to hold a bridge while a murderous mob advances on them ("Captain Errol").

Interestingly, the title character of this collection, Private McAuslan (AKA "The Dirtest Soldier in the World", "Private Piltdown" or "The Tartan Caliban") only appears in some of the stories. He is a great example of the secondary character who barges into center stage. McAuslan is the central character in about a third of the stories and a major character in another five. In the rest he is a minor character or does not appear at all. To the author's credit, McAuslan is not a mere clown figure. The narrator regards him with a mixture of horrified fascination, exasperated affection and reluctant respect.

In the last piece in this collection ("Extraduction"), George MacDonald Fraser tells us directly why he came to write these stories:
"I had done it out of affection and pride, and to preserve memories that I loved. Not strict fact, of course, but by no means fiction, either-many true incidents and characters, as well as adaptations and shapings and amalgams and inventions and disquises, but always doing my best to keep the background detail as accurate as I could, and to be faithful to the spirit of that time and those people."

In sum, an excellent collection of fine stories told by a master story teller.
eBooks Related to The Complete McAuslan
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020