» » Murder In Miniature: THE SHORT STORIES OF LEO BRUCE (Carolus Deene Series)

eBook Murder In Miniature: THE SHORT STORIES OF LEO BRUCE (Carolus Deene Series) epub

by Leo Bruce BRUCE

eBook Murder In Miniature: THE SHORT STORIES OF LEO BRUCE (Carolus Deene Series) epub
  • ISBN: 0897333675
  • Author: Leo Bruce BRUCE
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Academy Chicago Publishers (August 30, 2005)
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • ePUB size: 1827 kb
  • FB2 size 1216 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf txt lrf


Murder in Miniature book. These stories complete the oeuvre of a major detective novelist.

Murder in Miniature book. Here Bruce's gift for entertaining dialogue is at its peak, and so is his extraordinary gift for mystery: he teases, tangles and contrives with cunning. Even the slightest of the stories is deft and As an exponent of the classic detective novel in its pure form, Leo Bruce is unquestionably in the front rank.

Among Bruce's numerous fine detective novels, his CASE FOR THREE DETECTIVES (1936) is must-reading for everyone who appreciates a good puzzle combined with good humor. This present volume collects Bruce's 28 short crime stories, 27 of which were written for the London EVENING STANDARD, and only two of which were published in book form elsewhere. Ten stories feature Sergeant Beef, and eight feature Sergeant Grebe, another of Bruce's series detectives.

Under the name of Leo Bruce, one series of novels featured Sergeant Beef, a British police officer; a second featured Carolus Deene, senior history master at the fictional . Murder in Miniature The Short Stories of Leo Bruce (Ed. . Clue in the Mustard Evening Standard, 24 March 1950.

Under the name of Leo Bruce, one series of novels featured Sergeant Beef, a British police officer; a second featured Carolus Deene, senior history master at the fictional Queen's School, Newminster, as an amateur detective. Most Leo Bruce books are now out of print. Sergeant Beef series. Holiday Task Evening Standard, 16 May 1950. Murder in Miniature Evening Standard, 6 September 1950. The Doctor's Wife Evening Standard, 11 October 1950. Beef and the Spider Evening Standard, 18 November 1950.

Bruce, Leo. This is one of Sgt. Beef’s most interesting and perplexing cases. Bruce, Leo. His old friend Helena Gort calls on Carolus Deene to come to Cat’s Cradle, a seaside guest house and find out about two deaths judged respectively natural causes and suicide

Bruce, Leo. His old friend Helena Gort calls on Carolus Deene to come to Cat’s Cradle, a seaside guest house and find out about two deaths judged respectively natural causes and suicide. There is no doubt in Helena’s mind that something sinister has happened and something very unpleasant is brewing.

Place of Publication. Leo Bruce was the pen name of Rupert Croft-Cooke. He published 126 books in his lifetime and is famous for his series characters the beer drinking Sgt Beef and the urbane Carolus Deene. Country of Publication. Crime, Thriller & Adventure.

1992) The Stories of Leo Bruce (A book in the Carolus Deene series) A collection of stories by Leo Bruce . January 1992 : USA Hardback.

1992) The Stories of Leo Bruce (A book in the Carolus Deene series) A collection of stories by Leo Bruce (Rupert Croft-Cooke). As an exponent of the classic detective novel in its pure form, Leo Bruce is unquestionably in the front rank. September 2007 : USA Paperback.

As an exponent of the classic detective novel in its pure form, Leo Bruce is unquestionably in the front rank

As an exponent of the classic detective novel in its pure form, Leo Bruce is unquestionably in the front rank. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Most Leo Bruce books are now out of print . Croft-Cooke also wrote a large number of books, plays, short stories, and other work under his own name. 1 Sergeant Beef series. 2 Carolus Deene series. Pike) (Inspector Simler story).

This 1991 collection brought together all the (then) known uncollected short stories by Leo Bruce, the pseudonym used by Rupert Croft-Cooke (1903-1979) for his murder mysteries, which first featured Sergeant (later Inspector) Beef (1936-1952) and later the amateur sleuth Carolus Deene.

This 1991 collection brought together all the (then) known uncollected short stories by Leo Bruce, the pseudonym used by Rupert Croft-Cooke (1903-1979) for his murder mysteries, which first featured Sergeant (later Inspector) Beef (1936-1952) and later the amateur sleuth Carolus Deene (1955-1974). Beef appears in ten of the stories in this collection, which otherwise features another detective, Sergeant Grebe (who however never appeared in any of the novels), along with a variety of ironic tales with no series character.

The Short Stories of Leo Bruce. A collection of 28 short-very short-stories by Leo Bruce (pseudonym of the late Rupert Croft-Cooke), all but one written in the 50's for the London Evening Standard

The Short Stories of Leo Bruce. A collection of 28 short-very short-stories by Leo Bruce (pseudonym of the late Rupert Croft-Cooke), all but one written in the 50's for the London Evening Standard.

As an exponent of the classic detective novel in its pure form, Leo Bruce is unquestionably in the front rank. These stories complete the oeuvre of a major detective novelist. Here Bruce's gift for entertaining dialogue is at its peak, and so is his extraordinary gift for mystery: he teases, tangles and contrives with cunning. Even the slightest of the stories is deft and telling, skillfully narrated, with economy and point. The best are worthy additions to the canon, elegant, clever and satisfying. All but one story in this collection were written for the London Evening Standard, where they appeared between 1950 and 1956. This collection contains twenty-eight stories, only two of which have been previously collected: ten feature Sergeant Beef, eight feature Sergeant Grebe and ten have no series character. They add to our knowledge of Sergeant Beef, one of the most colorful of fictional detectives (and one whose full-length cases are too few in number); they introduce an unexpected second detective, the astute and resourceful policeman, Sergeant Grebe; and they offer a last chance to encounter anew their author's characteristic wit and ingenuity. Few writers so adroitly avoid the formulaic quality of crime writing by the variety and vitality of their characters.
Comments: (2)
Bil
Leo Bruce (aka British writer Rupert Croft-Cooke, 1903-1979) is one of the favorite authors of many mystery readers, including Jacques Barzun and Julian Symons. Among Bruce's numerous fine detective novels, his CASE FOR THREE DETECTIVES (1936) is must-reading for everyone who appreciates a good puzzle combined with good humor. It pits stolid, beer-loving Sergeant Beef against clever caricatures of three of literature's most famous detectives--Dorothy Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey, Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot, and G. K. Chesterton's Father Brown--and it is Sergeant Beef whose solution is the right one.

This present volume collects Bruce's 28 short crime stories, 27 of which were written for the London EVENING STANDARD, and only two of which were published in book form elsewhere. Ten stories feature Sergeant Beef, and eight feature Sergeant Grebe, another of Bruce's series detectives. The majority of these stories are fair-play puzzles in the classic mode, allowing readers to test their wits against those of the author and his fictional crime solvers. The remainder are non-puzzle stories which (with one exception) have ironic "punitive" plots: their focus is on people who either commit crimes or intend to commit crimes and how these people trip themselves up in some way. These latter stories are a bit like the so-called "inverted detective stories" of R. Austin Freeman, except that they sometimes end with the guilty parties realizing that they have made a serious mistake and will be caught as a result. The one exception to these two categories of stories is "The Scene of the Crime," which is more like a horror story, ending with a sense of menace and impending harm.

As with almost every collection of stories, there is an occasional "quality-control problem" with these little works. Some, for example, have very clever crimes and interesting criminals but suffer from weaknesses in the logic of detection, and in some cases it is just pure bad luck that causes the downfall of the criminal.

All in all, Bruce's ingenuity is far greater than that of most other crime fiction writers, and these stories well deserved to be rescued from obscurity. Among the best of the puzzle stories are "Blunt Instrument," "The Chicken and the Egg," "Clue in the Mustard," "The Doctor's Wife," "Holiday Task," "I, Said the Sparrow," "Murder in Miniature," "The Marsh Light," "Murder in Reverse," "Person or Persons," "Woman in the Taxi," and "Into Thin Air" (which recycles the clever central idea of "Holiday Task" but gives it a totally different mood). Among the better ironic "punitive" stories are "Rufus--and the Murderer," "Riverside Night," "The Nine Fifty-Five," and especially "On the Spot," which has a very neat twist at its end.

B. A. Pike has provided an informative introduction to the collection, and Barbara Spann has drawn 28 pencil sketches for it. For the most part, the book is well printed, but the typesetter has occasionally hyphenated words in the middle of a syllable (whi-
ch may annoy so-
me re-
aders).
Tam
Leo Bruce (aka British writer Rupert Croft-Cooke, 1903-1979) is one of the favorite authors of many mystery readers, including Jacques Barzun and Julian Symons. Among Bruce's numerous fine detective novels, his CASE FOR THREE DETECTIVES (1936) is must-reading for everyone who appreciates a good puzzle combined with good humor. It pits stolid, beer-loving Sergeant Beef against clever caricatures of three of literature's most famous detectives--Dorothy Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey, Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot, and G. K. Chesterton's Father Brown--and it is Sergeant Beef whose solution is the right one.

This present volume collects Bruce's 28 short crime stories, 27 of which were written for the London EVENING STANDARD, and only two of which were published in book form elsewhere. Ten stories feature Sergeant Beef, and eight feature Sergeant Grebe, another of Bruce's series detectives. The majority of these stories are fair-play puzzles in the classic mode, allowing readers to test their wits against those of the author and his fictional crime solvers. The remainder are non-puzzle stories which (with one exception) have ironic "punitive" plots: their focus is on people who either commit crimes or intend to commit crimes and how these people trip themselves up in some way. These latter stories are a bit like the so-called "inverted detective stories" of R. Austin Freeman, except that they sometimes end with the guilty parties realizing that they have made a serious mistake and will be caught as a result. The one exception to these two categories of stories is "The Scene of the Crime," which is more like a horror story, ending with a sense of menace and impending harm.

As with almost every collection of stories, there is an occasional "quality-control problem" with these little works. Some, for example, have very clever crimes and interesting criminals but suffer from weaknesses in the logic of detection, and in some cases it is just pure bad luck that causes the downfall of the criminal.

All in all, Bruce's ingenuity is far greater than that of most other crime fiction writers, and these stories well deserved to be rescued from obscurity. Among the best of the puzzle stories are "Blunt Instrument," "The Chicken and the Egg," "Clue in the Mustard," "The Doctor's Wife," "Holiday Task," "I, Said the Sparrow," "Murder in Miniature," "The Marsh Light," "Murder in Reverse," "Person or Persons," "Woman in the Taxi," and "Into Thin Air" (which recycles the clever central idea of "Holiday Task" but gives it a totally different mood). Among the better ironic "punitive" stories are "Rufus--and the Murderer," "Riverside Night," "The Nine Fifty-Five," and especially "On the Spot," which has a very neat twist at its end.

B. A. Pike has provided an informative introduction to the collection, and Barbara Spann has drawn 28 pencil sketches for it. For the most part, the book is well printed, but the typesetter has occasionally hyphenated words in the middle of a syllable (whi-
ch may annoy so-
me re-
aders).
eBooks Related to Murder In Miniature: THE SHORT STORIES OF LEO BRUCE (Carolus Deene Series)
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020