eBook Burr epub

by Gore Vidal

eBook Burr epub
  • ISBN: 058604163X
  • Author: Gore Vidal
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grafton; New Ed edition (1976)
  • Pages: 576 pages
  • ePUB size: 1458 kb
  • FB2 size 1229 kb
  • Formats txt lrf mbr doc


Burr (1973), by Gore Vidal, is a historical novel that challenges the traditional founding-fathers iconography of United States history, by means of a narrative that includes a fictional memoir, by Aaron Burr, in representing the people, politics, a. .

Burr (1973), by Gore Vidal, is a historical novel that challenges the traditional founding-fathers iconography of United States history, by means of a narrative that includes a fictional memoir, by Aaron Burr, in representing the people, politics, and events of the . in the early nineteenth century. It was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1974.

Gore Vidal's "Burr" is everything an historical novel should be, and more. A particular strength of "Burr" is the construct of the narrative

Gore Vidal's "Burr" is everything an historical novel should be, and more. Aaron Burr, along with Benedict Arnold, were America's original bad boys. Vidal's novel goes a long way in humanizing Burr, but does not necessarily minimize his notoriety. Rather, Vidal's novel reflects a plausible portrait of the only vice-president to literally get away with murder. Vidal does equally well personifying Burr's contemporaries. A particular strength of "Burr" is the construct of the narrative. Vidal moves seamlessly back and forth from the turbulent Revolutionary years of our Republic through the Jacksonian era.

Burr is the opening volume in Gore Vidal's great fictional chronicle of American history, each of which is being .

Burr is the opening volume in Gore Vidal's great fictional chronicle of American history, each of which is being republished in the Modern Library. History & Fiction. No other living writer brings more sparkling wit, vast learning, indelible personality, and provocative mirth to the job of writing an essay.

An extraordinarily intelligent and entertaining novel. Like a bruised apple, Burr has long lain ready for peeling, and what a fascinating book Vidal has made of him!

An extraordinarily intelligent and entertaining novel. A dazzling entertainment, a tour de force of historical imagination, a devastating analysis of America’s first principles. Like a bruised apple, Burr has long lain ready for peeling, and what a fascinating book Vidal has made of him! -Atlantic Monthly. Burr is a bravura tour de force, a brilliant evocation of the American political scene. Gore Vidal was born in 1925 at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (/vɪˈdɑːl/; born Eugene Louis Vidal, October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) was an American writer and public intellectual known for his epigrammatic wit, patrician manner, and polished style of writing. Vidal was born into a political family; his maternal grandfather, Thomas Pryor Gore, served as United States senator from Oklahoma (1907–1921 and 1931–1937)

The Aaron Burr of this story is really a surrogate for the wicked wit of Gore Vidal. I’d like to think that Burr was exactly how Vidal portrayed, the enigma of charm and enticing, irreverent behavior.

The Aaron Burr of this story is really a surrogate for the wicked wit of Gore Vidal. His observations on the founding fathers is frankly hilarious.

Brilliantly realized, enormously readable, Gore Vidal's best seller paints a fascinating portrait of Aaron Burr, who lived out his long life partly as a.

Brilliantly realized, enormously readable, Gore Vidal's best seller paints a fascinating portrait of Aaron Burr, who lived out his long life partly as a suspected traitor and partly as one of the most heroic and colorful founding fathers. Though the memoir itself and the young journalist are fictional, the facts are actual. The result is the rarest of books - a powerfully readable historical novel which at the same time recreates with scrupulous accuracy and the originality of a major historical imagination the most significant years in the history of America.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Vidal, Gore - The American Chronicle 1 - Burr.

Gore Vidal was born to Eugene Luther Vidal and Nina Gore at West Point in New York. Burr is the first book in the Narratives of Empire series. The book throws the spotlight on Aaron Burr, a figure that set the political arena of his time on fire

Gore Vidal was born to Eugene Luther Vidal and Nina Gore at West Point in New York. He attended St. Albans Preparatory School. At birth, Gore was christened Eugene Louis Vidal. It wasn’t until he was baptized at the age of 13 at Albans that he got the name ‘Gore’. The book throws the spotlight on Aaron Burr, a figure that set the political arena of his time on fire. Gore Vidal uses his wicked sense of humor and charming literary style to present the different dimensions of Aaron Burr.

Burr is the first novel in Gore Vidal's Narratives of Empire series, which spans the history of the United States from the Revolution to post-World War II. With their broad canvas and sprawling cast of fictional and historical characters. With their broad canvas and sprawling cast of fictional and historical characters, these novels present a panorama of American politics and imperialism, as interpreted by one of our most incisive and ironic observers. I read this after "1876" and had a bit more trouble following it although there were definitely signs of Vidal's great writing. Troubled times for the early founding fathers with very little agreement.

Comments: (7)
Kanek
Gore Vidal writes historical fiction with a sharp eye toward historical accuracy, but with the freedom granted by the genre to present history with a viewpoint. Aaron Burr provides an ample tableau for the talents of Vidal at the top of his game. Burr lived through the Revolution, serving briefly on Washington's staff and later with Benedict Arnold at Quebec. He soon became seriously involved in New York state politics and eventually became Jefferson's vice-president.

Burr seems to have always turned up in the middle of some controversy. He was nearly elected President instead of Jefferson due to a quirk in the electoral system of the day. He killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel while still VP and fled south and west to avoid prosecution in New Jersey. Jefferson soon charged him with treason for an alleged plot to separate the western states from the US. Burr was acquitted in a trial presided over by Chief Justice John Marshall. The reader meets lesser known characters such as James Wilkinson and Harman Blennerhassett among many others.

The story is told through the device of Burr writing his memoirs over a period of several years commencing in 1833 with the aid of Charles Schuyler, the book's only fictional character (aside from brief appearances by William de la Touche Clancey. This device allows Vidal to move back and forth between the Republic's early days and the end of the Jackson presidency. In the latter period the reader meets Matty Van Buren, the famed New York editor William Leggett, the corrupt collector of the NY ports Sam Swartout, and revisits Andrew Jackson.

Vidal presents the tale from his subject's viewpoint, one which is naturally quite favorable to Burr and somewhat at odds with the standard view in regard especially to the `Burr Conspiracy'. Thomas Jefferson particularly comes out poorly in this telling as does Washington. `Burr' was one of six works in what became Vidal's American Chronicles Series (Lincoln, 1876, Empire, Hollywood, and Washington, DC). I can also recommend Lincoln: A Novel and 1876 (Modern Library) to the reader (I've not yet read the others). Gore Vidal's `Burr' is a riveting ride through the early days of the Republic. Highest recommendation.
Vozuru
When Gore Vidal is writing strictly in the arena of historical fantasy (as in Creation or Julian) he's a man of letters who has few equals. My problem with Vidal comes when he flirts with his "true historical revelation" gimmick in books like Lincoln, like 1876, and like this one, Burr. Vidal has a master's gift of recreating a previous era down to the most amazing detail, and he's undeniably savvy in his prose, gloriously apt in his characterizations and tells a darn good story in the meantime, but I have caught him out a time or two through the years when it comes to inserting his speculative opinion as fact, and also with tampering with fact itself to create a story that better suits his aims in telling it. I don't totally fault him for so doing since every fiction writer who has ever drawn breath has tinkered with reality but when Vidal basks in the limelight his "this is how it REALLY was" tales create for him in the academic and literary worlds, he should let it be know that he is not penning complete non-fiction. I have reached the point with Vidal where I lean toward suspicion when he releases a book. I know I can count on him to tell a decent story and bring a past setting admirably to life, but I do keep in mind things may not have always been the way he says they were. I also remember that more than anything else, Vidal despises the American establishment, past and present, and never misses a chance to say something unflattering about it.

In Burr, the political strategist best remembered as the killer of the man on the ten-dollar bill is given Vidal's star treatment. We meet Burr the ambitious radical, Burr the would-be political conqueror, and Burr the charming free thinker whose love of nature, knowledge and self make him seem at once delightfully wicked and amiably down to earth. Aaron Burr was very nearly the third President of the United States, a fact often forgotten. His tie with Thomas Jefferson in the election of 1800 threatened to divide the nation and was not completely settled by Burr's elevation/demotion to the Vice-Presidency. Burr's story after this disputed election slides rapidly into chaos as he embroils himself in land-grab schemes, political feuds and eventually an infamous duel which results in him becoming the most hated man in the United States.

In this novel, Gore Vidal plays havoc with what the public knows or thinks it knows about some of the most famous early Americans. Thomas Jefferson, as cast in this novel, is an out and out deceitful bad guy who lies without hesitation and advances his own agenda at the cost of anyone and anything. Andrew Jackson, one of the few political giants of the period who did not completely turn his back on Burr, is a bumbling country bumpkin. And most of all, Alexander Hamilton, maybe in sheer force of intellect alone the most ingenious of all early Americans, is a cold political opportunist whose unforgivable offense to Burr's honor in Vidal's version of the events, is to slander Burr's deceased daughter with whisperings of incestuous conduct with her father.

Burr is a good novel and I would recommend it if asked. I would also point out some of the things I wrote in this review and caution anyone to give anything that seems fishy in Vidal's version a wide berth. Vidal is a fiction writer who too often gets praise more fitting for a non-fiction author.
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