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eBook The Drowning House: A Novel epub

by Elizabeth Black

eBook The Drowning House: A Novel epub
  • ISBN: 0385535864
  • Author: Elizabeth Black
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nan A. Talese; First Edition edition (January 15, 2013)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1280 kb
  • FB2 size 1568 kb
  • Formats mobi mbr azw lrf


view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Elizabeth Black's suspenseful inquiry into dark family secrets is enriched by a remarkable succession of images, often minutely observed, that bring characters, setting, and story sharply into focus. John Berendt, New York Times bestselling author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. possesses elegant descriptive powers. The honky-tonk allure of Glaveson's Strand district, in particular, comes alive in all its touched-up splendor.

If this were a list of the top upcoming Houston authors, they'd certainly be on it. For now, let's say they made remarkable debuts and we expect big, big things from them both.

The Drowning House marks the emergence of an impressive new literary voice. John Berendt, author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.

A gripping suspense story about a woman who returns to Galveston, Texas after a personal tragedy and is irresistibly drawn into the insular world she's struggled to leave. Photographer Clare Porterfield's once-happy marriage is coming apart, unraveling under the strain of a family tragedy. Minneapolis Star-Tribune Black mythologizes this landscape, evoking its essence and that of its inhabitants, creating a novel that is far more than the sum of its parts. Elizabeth Black’s suspenseful inquiry into dark family secrets is enriched by a remarkable succession of images, often minutely observed, that bring characters, setting, and story sharply into focus. Black’s tempered prose and moody vulnerability creates a rich debut; both sensitive and sensational.

I realized I was hungry, but I didn’t want to sit by myself in one of the busy eateries in full view of anyone else who might recognize me. Where could I go? Not back to the house. Then I remembered that a block or so away there had been an old candy factory that also housed an ice-cream parlor. It was still there, a long, narrow space with exposed brick walls and marble-topped counters. Cashiers in sleeve garters worked the black-and-gold registers.

The Drowning House: A Novel. Written by Elizabeth Black. Elizabeth Black is a poet. This book was hyped for its dual story of Clare, a photographer who, after a personal tragedy, returns to Galveston to direct an exhibition and begins to question the story of a girl whose body was found after the 1900 Great Hurricane, her hair entangled in the family chandelier. I suspected as much reading descriptions such as, "Around her, I felt as though every minute was already full, that all the air in any room that contained us both had already been used u. and "that the air and water are often so close to body temperature you sometimes feel, if it weren't for the accident of your skin

The Drowning House book.

The Drowning House book.

The Drowning is a 2008 novel by Camilla Läckberg. Its Swedish title is "Sjöjungfrun," literally translated in English as "The Mermaid". Like Margaret Atwood's The Blind Assassin, The Drowning contains a novel within a novel: 'The Mermaid' is that story.

A gripping suspense story about a woman who returns to Galveston, Texas after a personal tragedy and is irresistibly drawn into the insular world she’s struggled to leave.Photographer Clare Porterfield's once-happy marriage is coming apart, unraveling under the strain of a family tragedy. When she receives an invitation to direct an exhibition in her hometown of Galveston, Texas, she jumps at the chance to escape her grief and reconnect with the island she hasn't seen for ten years. There Clare will have the time and space to search for answers about her troubled past and her family's complicated relationship with the wealthy and influential Carraday family.  Soon she finds herself drawn into a century-old mystery involving Stella Carraday. Local legend has it that Stella drowned in her family's house during the Great Hurricane of 1900, hanged by her long hair from the drawing room chandelier. Could Stella have been saved? What is the true nature of Clare's family's involvement? The questions grow like the wildflower vines that climb up the walls and fences of the island. And the closer Clare gets to the answers, the darker and more disturbing the truth becomes. Steeped in the rich local history of Galveston, The Drowning House portrays two families, inextricably linked by tragedy and time."The Drowning House marks the emergence of an impressive new literary voice. Elizabeth Black's suspenseful inquiry into dark family secrets is enriched by a remarkable succession of images, often minutely observed, that bring characters, setting, and story sharply into focus." —John Berendt, author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
Comments: (7)
Agamaginn
If you are a reader who loves the masterful use of language and the power of the well-placed word, this is the novel for you. You will be shocked that you are reading a debut author. However, this book isn't for everyone. It isn't a "thriller" with carefully planted leads and it isn't a ghost story that will leave you on the edge of your seat. There are plenty of ghosts...but they aren't that kind.

Many reviewers have covered the plot, so I don't feel like I have to go into too much into that. The main character, Clare Porterfield, has had a very strange childhood. This book has such gorgeous descriptive writing, as I stated earlier, that it just drew me in. After the first few chapters, I spoke to my husband about how I loved finding hidden gems among all of the novels that I read. It's books like this that truly get me excited about reading. This isn't the formulaic mystery/thriller that you would get from other mainstream authors. There is a much more literary feel to this book that many suspense novels just don't have in them. The author, Elizabeth Black, writes with such passionate feelings that she is able to just suck you into her story and you can't possibly believe that this is the work of a first time novelist. The reader can see in vivid detail the abuse and dysfunction that the main character, Clare, grew up with as you read her thoughts and emotions. As many children who are abused, Clare was taught to believe that everything that happened to her was somehow normal.

Most of the prose is written from Clare Porterfield's point-of-view. It comes from her internal dialogue and thoughts set in the present day and also what she remembers from her childhood. Clare has been taught that her childhood was normal and though she dreads going back to her childhood home, something keeps beckoning her there. Then, when she starts to uncover surprising facts about the supposed death of Stella Carraday and even more about the cursed Carraday family in general she feels as if she might not ever leave. In this story not everyone or everything is as it appears on the outside. As Clare is also remembering things from childhood not everything is exact.

Clare along with other main and supporting characters often are quoted in the book as saying that on the Island history has a way of settling itself as the way the Islanders want to remember. I think this is the heart of the story. So much has happened to Clare and other characters, both good and bad, and instead of remembering as they really were, facts are polished up to hide the cracks and secrets. The question is does this do more harm than good? Who is harmed and who is protected and is it all really worth it in the end?

There were some things that bothered me as a reader that many other reviewers have mentioned. Mainly is the storyline in regards to Stella Carraday. Stella and her mysterious death are even mentioned in the book description, so one would expect a decent amount of the storyline to center around her. However, it doesn't. I was left with more unanswered questions and I feel that Black didn't give that enough attention in her actual story. It felt like she just let that storyline slip away somewhere in her writing process. There were a few other inconsistencies that bothered me but not enough to detract from the author's beautiful writing and elegant prose. I definitely would recommend it to others and will be on the lookout for more of Elizabeth Black's work, because if this was her first novel...it really can get only better from here. This was a solid 4.5 star book for me.
Moswyn
I loved the twists and turns. I loved the characters and their layers. I loved feeling like I knew each person for real and knew the island like my own hometown. The small bit of talk about Stella and her father and then the awkwardness of Patrick and Clare's situation and history made me really uncomfortable. BUT that only would have happened being written well! I'd recommend it to those that are always trying to guess ahead and out do the author. You won't with this one.
VariesWent
In this novel Elizabeth Black has skillfully created two integrated, rich, and complex portraits: of the city of Galveston and of an extended Southern family. Both have deep pasts, filled with tragedy and secrets; both have sunny public personas and hidden corruption. Clare, the main figure of the novel, has been formed and scarred in ways that she only partially understands at the beginning of the novel, when she returns home after many years up north. Her search to get to the bottom of the anxiety and unhappiness that have plagued her drives the novel. I must say that it develops slowly and at times, you feel that you are floating in a morass of clues and hints that don't seem to be adding up -- but that is exactly what the character is feeling. Then suddenly, meaning flashes on you and the pace picks up and drives you straight through the surprising revelations to the satisfying end. Along the way, I relished the lush descriptions that brought Galveston and its unique culture and mindset to life. Most enjoyable.
Gindian
The author's aim to put across a certain mentality of Galveston BOIs is reminiscent of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil in its description of Savannah natives' peculiarities, to be discovered by the journalist outsider, in Galveston's case by the visiting banker, Ty. Such details help the reader understand how moral and other irregularities, even crimes, are by tradition simply ignored or kept secret by those "Born on the Island," including the inconsequential murder of a major figure in the story. I found an interesting confluence of plot lines in the desire of three women to flee the Island permanently with a secret lover: Stella with her architect; the teen-aged Clare with Patrick; and Eleanor with Will. The more subtle but persistent motif of incest permeates the events recalled or discovered by the narrator: between Fantine and her spouse; between Clare's sister and the sister's biological father, of course between Stella and her father, and if only potentially, between the younger Clare and Patrick. The skillful use of photography as a metaphor, indeed of Clare's Leica, provides a unifying force in the revelations.
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