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eBook The Prince of India or Why Constantinople Fell Part One epub

by Lew Wallace

eBook The Prince of India or Why Constantinople Fell Part One epub
  • ISBN: 1417927380
  • Author: Lew Wallace
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 25, 2004)
  • Pages: 512 pages
  • ePUB size: 1296 kb
  • FB2 size 1565 kb
  • Formats docx lit mbr doc


Why constantinople fell. The roofing and the floor, where exposed,were clean, even bright; in all other parts subject to the weather andthe wash there was only the blackness of pitch.

Why constantinople fell. The steersman sat on abench at the stern. Occasionally, from force of habit, he rested a handupon the rudder-oar to be sure it was yet in reach.

This novel from Wallace, the writer of Ben-Hur, recounts events leading to the fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453. This novel from Wallace, the writer of Ben-Hur, recounts events leading to the fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453

If you do not see the book, write to us about this problem. Other author's books: The Fair God; or, The Last of the 'Tzins: A Tale of the Conquest of Mexico.

If you do not see the book, write to us about this problem. The Prince of India; Or, Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 02. The Prince of India; Or, Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 01. Ben-Hur; a tale of the Christ.

Alternate title was Why Constantinople Fell. Volume I is 502 pages and Volume II is 578 pages. ovel by the Indiana author of Ben Hur.

Books by same authors: The Prince of India of Why Constantinople Fell volume 2. The Prince of India of Why Constantinople Fell volume 2. 10, 10. The Boyhood of Christ.

by. Wallace, Lew, 1827-1905.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. Wandering Jew. Publisher. WorldCat (this item).

Book II the prince of india

Book II the prince of india. The roofing and the floor, where exposed, were clean, even bright; in all other parts subject to the weather and the wash there was only the blackness of pitch. The steersman sat on a bench at the stern. Occasionally, from force of habit, he rested a hand upon the rudder-oar to be sure it was yet in reach.

THE PRINCE OF INDIA (Historical Novel). One fee. Stacks of books. Lew Wallace,Book House. Lew Wallace: The Complete Novels (Book House). Lew Wallace,Golden Deer Classics. Lew Wallace: The Complete Novels (Golden Deer Classics).

The Prince of India is a wonderful book, and while it may not be the best source for historical facts on the fall . The title character, The Prince of India, is actually little more than a footnote character rather than a major protagonist.

The Prince of India is a wonderful book, and while it may not be the best source for historical facts on the fall of Constantinople, it offers the reader a journey through the near east. It takes place in a land that was paramount in its historical import for hundreds, even thousands, of years. There is a degree of romance and intrigue, yes, but neither of these is all that compelling.

Or Why Constantinople Fell ebook. Chapter III. The Hidden Treasure. Book II. The Prince of India. Chapter I. A Messenger from Cipango. 0,0. Wydawca: KtoCzyta. On the pages of the works of Lewis Wallace characters lived, fell in love, fought and died, influencing the structure of public affairs. This novel tells about the events that led to the fall of Constantinople. Legendary wandering Jew under the guise of the Prince of India helps save the city. A wandering Jew served as the basis for several stories, and this is one of the best. Szczegóły Chapter III.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Comments: (5)
Celace
These are the stories I think out modern era has forgotten to tell. I assume there's quite a lot of liberalities taken with the historicity of the setting, but as a means to transport ones thoughts and ethics to an historic era this is a fascinating read. It's not quite the story as is Ben-Hur but nevertheless it's refreshing to see so many perspectives on institutions and empires practically forgotten in modern western culture.

As a story some parts get a little tedious but it picks up often enough and also refrains from easy plot lines and conclusions that give it an authenticity that I appreciated.
Whitecaster
Only received one volume - full credit made.
Benn
Everything about the process and the books themselves was perfect. Next to Wikipedia, amazon is the best site on the web. Thank you and keep up the excellent job you are doing.
Samugor
The Prince of India is a wonderful book, and while it may not be the best source for historical facts on the fall of Constantinople, it offers the reader a journey through the near east. It takes place in a land that was paramount in its historical import for hundreds, even thousands, of years. The book is meant for a reader willing to expand their imagination and flow along the Bosphorus in search of a new world. Of course, "the voice of reason" evaluates the book in a cynical manner, because the book is not intended to be an empirical report, but rather a brief and pleasant look into a distant, and much different, time and place. One must be able to imagine the vivid scenes, and Wallace truly paints the picture to support the rendition. The previous review said it has its romance and action, which is true, but the book takes its time. There is indeed a masculine romance from start to finish, as the book follows the Prince of India, the "wandering Jew," from days of old to his midieval encounter with the chivalrous Sultan Muhammad. The book is a charmful display of love, war, religion, and philosophy. The story left me in the way a summer romance leaves a void in one's heart, leaving me wanting more books of such great grandeur. Granted, and I will give the "voice of reason" the benefit of the doubt, one's reflection simply mirrors one's mind within the object. Thankfully, at the time of reading, I was in in an untroubled state of mind, free, and full of imaginative clarity. Lastly, on a practical note, I recommend that anyone interested in purchasing the book, find a first edition - It is a beautiful two volume set, the feel and smell of its crisp pages will carry you along the Bosphorus with the fine words of Wallace.
Fearlesssinger
Famous as the author of "Ben-Hur" and a US Civil War general of average abilities, Wallace does not hit the same heights in this book as with "Ben-Hur" which has been filmed on numerous occasions. The name of the book itself is something of a misnomer. The title character, The Prince of India, is actually little more than a footnote character rather than a major protagonist. There is a degree of romance and intrigue, yes, but neither of these is all that compelling. Plus, you will learn next to nothing about the myriad of factors (both internal and external) that led up to the rapidly waning days of Constantinople and what remained of the once mighty Byzantine Empire - the direct heir of Rome. Unless you are a Lew Wallace afficionado or are interested in obscure American novels of the late 19th Century, you would not be that well served in wading through what was originally a voluminous two-volume magnum opus. For those interested in knowing more about the actual fall of Constantinople, they would be better advised to consult Steven Runciman, John Julius Norwich, or George Ostrogorsky and their non-fiction works regarding the rise and fall of the Byzantine state. In General Wallace's favor, however, this much can be said: He spent four years as US Ambassador to the Sublime Porte (the court of the Ottoman Empire). Therefore, he at least had some first-hand knowledge of the area when he went to write this book. Unfortunately, he fell short when it came to combining a coherent storyline with a verigated tapestry of historical events and fusing them into a sensible organic whole.
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