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eBook Shanghai Station epub

by Bartle Bull

eBook Shanghai Station epub
  • ISBN: 0786714867
  • Author: Bartle Bull
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Carroll & Graf Publishers (December 21, 2004)
  • Pages: 394 pages
  • ePUB size: 1211 kb
  • FB2 size 1163 kb
  • Formats docx lit rtf doc


Praise for Bartle Bull. Good fun, and considerably more intelligent entertainment than is customarily dished out by the robotic hacks whose novels find their way onto the bestsellers list.

High adventure and romance in the most exciting city in the world, the crucible of East and West-Shanghai Station is the story of a young Russian aristocrat, Alexander Karlov, who flees the Communist revolution of 1917 only to find himself in a turbulent, exotic life of passion and violence and revenge. Praise for Bartle Bull. Bartle Bull brilliantly brings to life post-WWI Shanghai. Great tale from a great writer.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the successes of his popular Africa trilogy-A Café on the Nile.

A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the success of his popular African novels A Caf on the Nile and The Devil's Oasis with this equally rousing and romantic tale of historical adventure, political terror and personal revenge set dramatically against the backdrop of China's teeming port city of Shanghai.

A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the successes of his popular Africa trilogyA Cafe on the Nile, The White Rhino Hotel, and The Devil's Oasiswith a rousing historical adventure. Shanghai Station is a compelling tale of political terror and personal vengeance that unfolds in 1918 in China's colorful, turbulent port city of Shanghai.

urn:acs6:l:pdf:aab-8c98bfdd7d09 urn:acs6:l:epub:be0-7b355ceb4088 urn:oclc:record:1036943308.

Shanghai Station book.

A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the success of his popular African novels A Café on the Nile and The Devil's Oasis with this equally rousing and romantic tale of historical adventure, political terror and personal revenge set dramatically against the backdrop of China's teeming port city of Shanghai.

Praise for Bartle Bull.

Shanghai-a roiling, boiling stew of the modern and ancient, of violently clashing interests and astonishing contrasts-is the perfect setting for this multifaceted tale

Bull's story centers on young Alexander Karlov, who is part of the émigré community that fled revolutionary Russia. Shanghai-a roiling, boiling stew of the modern and ancient, of violently clashing interests and astonishing contrasts-is the perfect setting for this multifaceted tale. Humanity, in all its splendor and misery, is on jaw-dropping display. Everyone is on the make, either for money or power-or both.

A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the successes of his popular Africa trilogy—A Café on the Nile, The White Rhino Hotel, and The Devil's Oasis—with a rousing historical adventure. Shanghai Station is a compelling tale of political terror and personal vengeance that unfolds in 1918 in China's colorful, turbulent port city of Shanghai. Well-born Alexander Karlov arrives in Shanghai with a mission, for the Bolsheviks have brutally killed his mother and abducted his twin sister. Vengeance commands Alexander's soul. It also entangles him in perilous alliances—with the Cossack hit man Ivan Semyonov; with Mei-lan, a woman who knows Shanghai's darkest secrets; with "Big Ear," leader of the city's most powerful Triad; with the French police; and with a spirited young American woman who calls herself Jesse James.
Comments: (7)
Cala
Be forewarned: This really isn't a review of "Shanghai Station."
Rather, it's a review of a Bartle Bull as a novelist.
First, though, I'd like to say that I stumbled on his works by pure chance; serendipity, if you will. Because even though most of his books seem to have been well-reviewed -- deservedly so, I'd say, because they're extraordinarily well-done -- somehow I managed to go years without hearing of him. Until quite recently. For which, I'm most grateful.
Because Bartle Bull is a novelist of the first order. He's a master of dialogue, spinner of interesting tales, and without peer at creating a sense of place. And they're usually places (and periods) that are inherently fascinating to begin with... such as the Shanghai of ninety years ago or colonial Africa.
As far as I can tell, too, every word he says about such places is firmly rooted in historical fact. Which is right up my alley. Sort of like two for the price of one: history lesson with compelling drama and action tossed in as a bonus. Or, if you prefer, vice versa.
In any case, though, I'd say Bartle Bull is as good at the historical novel as anyone I've ever come across, Gore Vidal included. And it's really hard for me to imagine that a serious reader of that genre would not enjoy Bartle Bull. If you give him a try, I don't believe you'll be disappointed.
Steelcaster
Historical fiction at a good pace with characters who are most often well developed , occasional flaws , from my perspective , simply because the females are written quite flat. the time and the history made the story line entertaining . The gruesome first few chapters , I believe after reading the whole book were to a point , necessary particularly at the time it was written .
Dagdalas
My first read of Bartle Bull's works. Will not be my last. Looking forward with great anticipation to the sequel. His knowledge of the historical background events of the countries in which the events take place (Russia and China) is exceptional. The story was spun with the touch of genius and provided a most satisfying read.
Voodoogore
re bought this as I had lost my original copy and have re read several times along with all the others in the series. great characters well written and filled with so much colour history and entertainment.... would make a great series of movies !!!
Dianalmeena
Somewhat true to historical fact. Exciting in parts. Story flows nicely. Not up to Ian Fleming, but close!
Perdana
The well paced narrative is set against a fascinating period in history. The details of location and actual historical events complement the sharply defined characters, creating a wonderful story. Only the ending leaves the reader a bit flat.
Yndanol
Writing is so vivid it makes you want to visit Shanghai in the wake of the Russion Revolution and prerevolutionary China. Great adventure. Highly recommended.
I wish that there were more books in this series.
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