» » The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales

eBook The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales epub

by Patrick K. Ford

eBook The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales epub
  • ISBN: 0520034147
  • Author: Patrick K. Ford
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First Edition edition (March 15, 1977)
  • Pages: 205 pages
  • ePUB size: 1354 kb
  • FB2 size 1618 kb
  • Formats lrf txt doc mobi


The Mabinogi is a collection of translated Welsh tales from the White Book of Rhydderch (1300-1325 CE), the .

The Mabinogi is a collection of translated Welsh tales from the White Book of Rhydderch (1300-1325 CE), the Red Book of Hergest (1375-1425 CE) and the manuscript National Library of Wales MS. 6209E (1600-1700 CE). It consists of four "branches", or collections of stories; the author also included "The Tale of Gwion Bach", "The Tale of Taliesin", and Cad Goddeu. The tales are of unknown authorship and age. Reading these stories provides insight into medieval Welsh storytelling, cultural traditions, and mythology.

Ford, Patrick K. Publication date. Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed. Branwen, daughter of Llyr. Manawydan, son of Llyr. Math, son of Mathonwy. The tale of Gwion Bach. The tale of Taliesin. Appendix: Cad goddeu. Mabinogion, Welsh literature, Tales, Medieval, Tales, Littérature galloise, Contes médiévaux, Contes. Berkeley : University of California Press.

The four stories that make up the Mabinogi, along with three additional tales from the same tradition, form this collection and compose the core of the ancient Welsh mythological cycle. Included are only those stories that have remained unadulterated by the influence of the French Arthurian romances, providing a rare, authentic selection of the finest works in medieval Celtic literature. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Patrick K. Ford - 1994 - Speculum 69 (4):1213-1215. The Arthur of the Welsh: The Arthurian Legend in Medieval Welsh Literature. Rachel Bromwich, A. O. H. Jarman, Brynley F. Roberts.

Speculum 53 (4):805-807 (1978). Patrick K. John T. Koch - 1994 - Speculum 69 (4):1127-1129. A Guide To Welsh Literature, I. Patrick Ford - 1979 - Speculum 54 (4):812-817. Agents in Early Welsh and Early Irish. Nicole Müller - 1999. Llywarch, Ancestor of Welsh Princes. Patrick Ford - 1970 - Speculum 45 (3):442-450. Early Welsh Genealogical Tracts.

In this book, Ford includes six of the eleven stories and one more not normally grouped with them (Taliesin).

Other tales are included in this volume, which represents the core of Welsh mythology. In this book, Ford includes six of the eleven stories and one more not normally grouped with them (Taliesin). Among the tales are the all important Four Branches of the Mabinogi: four myths that are loosely connected to each other. Confused a bit? Don't worry.

The four stories which make up the "Mabinogi" along with three additional tales from the same tradition form this collection and comprise the core of the ancient Welsh mythological cycle. ; trans. 1977)The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales. Berkeley: University of California Press. Focuses on the native tales of the Mabinogion, including the Mabinogi. Mabinogi Translations. Bollard, John K. trans, and Griffiths, Anthony; photog. 2006) The Mabinogi: Legend and Landscape of Wales. Gomer Press, Llandysul.

The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales by Patrick K. Ford 9780520309586 (Paperback, 2019) Delivery UK delivery is within 3 to 5 working days

The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales by Patrick K. Ford 9780520309586 (Paperback, 2019) Delivery UK delivery is within 3 to 5 working days. Read full description.

Patrick Kildea Ford, American Celtic studies educator. National Endowment of the Humanities fellow, 1972, University of California at Los Angeles fellow, 1973, Fulbright fellow, 1973-1974; grantee Skaggs Foundation, 1981-1983, American Council Learned Societies, 1985, National Endowment of the Humanities, 1986, 94, 96, 99, 2002; honorary fellow Center for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies/U.

The title Mabinogi refers to the first four stories in this collection of tales from Welsh tradition. They are best known as the "Four Branches of the Mabinogi," and comprise the tales of Pwyll, Branwen, Manawydan, and Math. The remaining stories also spring from the same tree, and together they form a collection that comprises the core of the ancient Welsh mythological cycle. They are also among the best the medieval Celtic literature has to offer.In the first thoroughly revised edition and translation of this world classic since Lady Charlotte Guest's famous Mabinogion went out of print, Mr. Ford has endeavored to present a scholarly document in readable, modern English. Basing his criteria on the latest scholarship in myth, he includes only those stories that have remained unadulterated by the influence of the French Arthurian romances. These are, in addition to the "Four Branches," the tale of "Kulhwch and Olwen," which is rooted in the mythological origins of Arthur, seen here in his role of divine hunter in pursuit of the swine-god; "Lludd and Lleuelis," which reaches beyond its immediate Celtic sources into ancient Indo-European ideologies; and the long unavailable "Tale of Taliesin," which offers insights into Celtic concepts of the archetypal poet-seer and the acquisition of Divine Wisdom.
Comments: (7)
Todal
I received this book the evening before departing on a trip. After settling in on the plane the woman who was seated next to me asked, "What are you reading?" I showed her and was greeted with an immediate "Oooooh.... ugghh." I must admit that I understood her reaction. Although I have steadfastly slogged my way through them, many translations of ancient works have left me wishing for the touch of a modern bard. This one, however, did not (or perhaps it had, indeed, benefitted from such a touch!). Ford was my companion on both the flight out and the return trip. He was informative, entertaining, insightful, and (I am told by others who would know), quite accurate. I recommend this book highly.
Flocton
The Mabinogi is a collection of translated Welsh tales from the White Book of Rhydderch (1300-1325 CE), the Red Book of Hergest (1375-1425 CE) and the manuscript National Library of Wales MS. 6209E (1600-1700 CE). It consists of four "branches", or collections of stories; the author also included "The Tale of Gwion Bach", "The Tale of Taliesin", and Cad Goddeu. The tales are of unknown authorship and age. Reading these stories provides insight into medieval Welsh storytelling, cultural traditions, and mythology.

The author of this translation makes the reader well aware that much about these stories remains unclear. He provides a lengthy (and sometimes daunting) introduction, which explains the occasionally controversial background of the tales. The author recognized that there is a paucity of accurate translations of Welsh mythology. He sought to highlight the academic and historical research conducted of the tales, and left out the "romanticized" stories. The reader is warned about the (usually irrational) assimilation of Judeo-Christian traditions into Irish and Welsh mythological texts. Celtic mythology is widely believed to have been an oral tradition until it was written down centuries later, presumably by Christian scribes. This sometimes colors the story, but it is obvious when it happens. In the Introduction, the author seeks to correlate the tales with Celtic deities, and stories from other Celtic regions such as Ireland. This introduction supports the hypothesis of an Indo-European society and religious structure.

Through studies of various manuscripts concerning Taliesin, the author hypothesizes that there are perhaps two Taliesins- a genuine "historical" poet, and a legendary shape-shifter. He explains that the creation of Celtic poetry had magical and spiritual overtones, and shape-shifting or "shamanism" was practiced by poets. Taliesin claims divine properties, such as his birth from the elements at the beginning of time, the knowledge of the supernatural and otherworld, and intensive wisdom ["the literal meaning of drui, derwydd `druid', imbas, cyfarwydd, and other words associated with the scope of poetic activities among the Celts" (pg 19)]. The Book of Taliesin contains a poem, Cad Goddeu, translated in this book, which illustrates the magical nature of trees.

The challenges of reading this book were worth the effort and I recommend reading it. The author provided a much-needed pronunciation guide of Welsh, and I found myself referring to this and writing down the English equivalences in the text. The stories are entertaining and humorous. Though some of the conversational language is archaic, the themes of the stories are timeless- the "battle of the sexes", the jealous step-mother, the importance of sexual faithfulness, unlikely circumstances needed for the death of a hero, and debilitating lust. The tales describe beliefs important to the Celts- the equine goddess who possesses a symbol of unending fertility and prosperity, the divine hunter, the sacredness of nighttime and a year-and-a-day, the chaste friend, the thin veil between this world and the Otherworld, magical shape-shifting, rebirth, the magic of the sea, and sacred animals and trees.
Mala
This is the Welsh Folklore go-to. It is translated much better than most I have read from the original Welsh Mabinogi. The condition of the book was perfect, which I was happy to see since you never really know what happens from warehouse/store to your front door.
happy light
If you are at all interested in classic Medieval tales you'll enjoy this book! I had a hard time keeping track of some of the characters because for me at least it was hard to pronounce some of their names. But I enjoyed the book.
Vaua
Slowly working on this one. Over all i'm just thankful that there is a solid mythical source to read in the midst of so much New Age confusion.
PanshyR
The best I have read on this topic so far!
generation of new
Patrick Ford's translation is the best that I've read. It appears to be the most accurate translation and the easiest to read and understand. Anyone who is interested in Welsh mythology or mythology in general should read this book. The tales themselves are interesting and entertaining. They give us a great glimpse into the world of the ancient Welsh people.
Got this book for a class on mythologies, it turned out to be rather interesting! Great tales and some additional notes on the details in the myths that make it clearer!
eBooks Related to The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020