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eBook The Making of T.S. Eliot: A Study of the Literary Influences epub

by Joseph Maddrey

eBook The Making of T.S. Eliot: A Study of the Literary Influences epub
  • ISBN: 0786442719
  • Author: Joseph Maddrey
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McFarland (May 13, 2009)
  • Pages: 190 pages
  • ePUB size: 1264 kb
  • FB2 size 1206 kb
  • Formats txt docx lrf azw


This chronological survey of major influences on .  . It examines his childhood influences as well as the literary influences that inspired him to write his earliest poetry; his life as an American expatriate living in London from 1915 to 1930, inclu This chronological survey of major influences on . Eliot's worldview covers the poet's spiritual and intellectual evolution in stages, by trying to see the world as Eliot.

The second half of the book tracks Eliot's life as an American expatriate living in London from 1915 to 1930, studying his ill-fated marriage and his intellectual engagement with the literary traditions of his .

The second half of the book tracks Eliot's life as an American expatriate living in London from 1915 to 1930, studying his ill-fated marriage and his intellectual engagement with the literary traditions of his new country. This section also finds the poet examining his identity as a European in the aftermath of World War I-an examination which, coupled with personal crisis, produced his masterpiece The Waste Land.

Eliot in Love and Los Angeles: A Photo Essay. Cover art for the forthcoming book Simply EliotIn the summer of 2009 I attended the inaugural . Eliot: A Study of the Literary Influences. Eliot Summer School in London, England. Before the first session, I started chatting with a group of international Eliot scholars. One of them asked me where I was from. When I said Los Angeles, he responded dryly, I’m sorry. It was a predictable bit of snobism, entirely appropriate to the setting. Eliot hated California. In a series of private lett.

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1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The making of . 2009, McFarland & C. Publishers.

Thomas Stearns Eliot's poem about individualism written during the Progressive Era: an analysis. Seferis eventually translates Eliot’s The Waste Land, Konstantina Georganta explains, and in his prologues to his translations, he calls for the kind of dialogue she traces throughout Conversing Identities: Encounters Between British, Irish and Greek Poetry, 1922–1952.

Eliot: A Study of the Literary Influences. But how much does the obscurity that confounds readers of a poem differ from, say, the slang that seduces listeners of hip-hop?

Eliot: A Study of the Literary Influences. The Flowers of Evil, trans. London: McFarland & C. oogle Scholar. The Death of St. Narcissus’ and ‘Ode’: Two Suppressed Poems by . American Literature 50 (4): 604–612. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Modernism, Memory and Desire: . Eliot and Virginia Woolf. Ontario: Queens University Press. The Masculinity Behind the Ghosts of Modernism in Eliot’s Four Quartets.

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965) was a poet, essayist, publisher, playwright, and literary and social critic. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, to a prominent Boston Brahmin family, he moved to England in 1914 at the age of 25 and would settle, work and marry there. He became a British subject in 1927 at the age of 39, subsequently renouncing his American passport.

S. Eliot: A Study in Character and Style. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983. --, ed. T. S. Eliot: The Modernist in History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

More than a century after his earliest works were published, T.S. Eliot remains one of the world's most celebrated--and highly enigmatic--20th century poets. He is often cited as an authority on modern art, philosophy, and religion, despite the fact that his words are cited in an overwhelming variety of conflicting contexts. An understanding of Eliot's work, then, requires knowledge of his attempts to assimilate many different ideas during his time as a Harvard University student, a struggling poet in World War I London, and an eventual spokesman for the Anglican Church. This chronological survey of major influences on Eliot's worldview covers the poet's spiritual and intellectual evolution in stages, by trying to see the world as Eliot did. The first half of the book examines his childhood influences as well as the literary influences that inspired him to write his earliest poetry. These chapters examine Eliot's formal education, including his years as an undergraduate at Harvard University, where he focused on the Western canon and came to understand his own writing as the product of a cumulative literary tradition. The second half of the book tracks Eliot's life as an American expatriate living in London from 1915 to 1930, studying his ill-fated marriage and his intellectual engagement with the literary traditions of his new country. This section also finds the poet examining his identity as a European in the aftermath of World War I--an examination which, coupled with personal crisis, produced his masterpiece The Waste Land. The final chapters reveal the ways in which Eliot's intellectual pursuits fostered a spiritual rebirth that simultaneously reflected his past and revealed his future, demonstrating how the early Romantic revolutionary became a staunch defender of tradition.
Comments: (3)
Matty
Definitely a good read. This fine book takes into account what it is that makes a particular person a particular (and in this case, a phenomenally talented) poet. And doing so, not only does Maddrey explore Eliot's family and schooling (as a biographer). What is new here is Maddrey's consideration of the intellectual lives of Eliot's teachers and university professors (including such lights as George Santayana). For of course, Maddrey shows, the books and articles that these educators were reading and writing, and their engagement with the questions and concerns that were 'in the air' informed their teaching. Maddrey also stresses the importance of the friends he makes when he travels to England - and so the importance of their interests, their studies, and the experience of themselves with Eliot engaging now as young adults with the questions and concerns that were 'in the air'. Maddrey shows that for a person like Eliot, how and what he was taught, and people with whom he conversed were essential to 'the making of T. S. Eliot.' I've seen elsewhere that Maddrey wrote the book someone could have given him when his high school English class included 'The Waste Land'. Here it is - the book for every bright teen encountering this sort of literature for the first time, and a companion for everyone finding or returning to poetry and literature afterward. A fine book to read. A fine book to give.
in waiting
I teach Eliot in college. I enjoyed this work of sturdy scholarship which, in an inexpensive edition, would probably be much assigned. Maddrey grinds no axe, which frees the professor to grind his own. He assembles Eliot's sources and influences and lets them speak at length. The quotations he chose were telling, and often witty. When he wrote of Asian influences-- the toughest part of the work-- he did a good job distinguishing between Hinduism and Buddhism. He writes clearly. An undergraduate could follow without difficulty, and be intrigued enough by some of Maddrey's finds, to dig up the whole book on her own and continue.

Maddrey is an Americanist (Eliot, remember, is a an American author!) better known for his inspired idea that America's taste in horror films, decade by decade, reflected the country's current fears. Reviews indicated that book is a similarly clear primer of American horror films. I'm going to look it up.

Recommended for school and public libraries. George J. Leonard, Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, San Francisco State University.
ALAN
It is a honest impulse when faced with art to wonder where it came from. What inspired this one human to create on a level that is unfathomable to most others? Where did the idea come from? This is the question Maddrey asks and tries to answer in this critical work. In his study, Maddrey follows the influences that Eliot cited. The book is generally chronological but the emphasis is more on the literary and philosophical influences behind Eliot's writing. In this pursuit, Maddrey is willing to take the poet at his word. The research behind this work is largely Eliot's own writing and the assent of other Eliot scholars. Because of the nature of Eliot, this allows for very well-rounded arguments as Eliot not only was often contradictory, and happily so, he also wrote introspectively about his own motives and influences in a refreshingly honest way. Writing a critical work about Eliot that relies on Eliot's self-criticism is strangely expansive and critical as well as generous.

This is a refreshing read and I enjoyed it thoroughly, It feels as though Maddrey is telling you affectionate but impartial stories about a favorite but distant uncle. His extensive research into Eliot informs his text; one gets the feel of a fan who can maintain an intellectual perspective. Although Maddrey is careful to describe the difference in the philosophical influences on Eliot, he does not betray a personal critical slant on these influence, short of a general affection and admiration for the author himself.

This was an enjoyable read, and reread. My only complaint is Maddrey's admiration for certain works led me out of his text and into my, and the public, library to read Eliot's own words again. His description of specific works, that I felt I knew well enough to quote, forced me to reread these pieces as what Maddrey discovered (or what Eliot claimed) in the text contradicted what I was so certain was there. I was forced to re-read, and re-read again, hundreds of lines of verse and hundreds of critical pages to refresh and revise my understanding and certain knowledge of Eliot. It was a much needed new perspective on many old favorites. Other than an enthusiasion for the work, Maddrey brings no slant to the interpretation, instead striving to support the variable opinion of Eliot on his own efforts which evolved, inevitably, through his own changes in age, view and perspective. I think any enthusiast of Eliot should start his critical readings with Maddrey's work. It's an accessible but intellectual leaping off point.
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