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eBook Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing (The Empson Lectures) epub

by Margaret Atwood

eBook Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing (The Empson Lectures) epub
  • ISBN: 0521662605
  • Author: Margaret Atwood
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (March 7, 2002)
  • Pages: 248 pages
  • ePUB size: 1629 kb
  • FB2 size 1580 kb
  • Formats mbr rtf txt lit


Negotiating with the Dead. This erudite book, it is astonishing to note, was written by William Empson when he was only twenty-three.

Negotiating with the Dead. Published by the press syndicate of the university of cambridge. The Pitt Building, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is also astonishing to note that when he was in the full throes of composition he was expelled from the University of Cambridge for being found with contraceptives in his room.

Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing is a non-fiction work by Canadian author Margaret Atwood. Cambridge University Press first published it in 2002.

Negotiating with the Dead book. In Margaret Atwood is, I tentatively conclude, not really the kind of writer I truly enjoy. I can appreciate her work, but I don't fall in love with it. Written in response to a request to be the Empson lecturer at the University of Cambridge, a series of five lectures, here worked into chapters, explains how it "is" to be a writer.

is what every reader wants, a learned distillation of world lit and myth as viewed by that endangered species, a. .In it, Margaret Atwood adapts six lectures she gave at the University of Cambridge in 2000

is what every reader wants, a learned distillation of world lit and myth as viewed by that endangered species, a working writer; 219 pages, each guaranteed entertaining, to say nothing of edifying. Atwood is the leading Canadian author and one of the most eminent women writing in English. In it, Margaret Atwood adapts six lectures she gave at the University of Cambridge in 2000. Rather, the thoughts circle around and refer to and bounce off one another, with all coalescing generally around the medium of writing.

Last year in Cambridge, Margaret Atwood delivered a series of lectures about writing. She rose with exemplary grace to the Janus task of addressing the academic and the literary world together, and Negotiating with the Dead comes from those lectures. Her light touch on hard thoughts, her humour and eclectic quotations, lend enchantment to an argument that has as many undulating tentacles as a well-developed sea anemone.

Atwood's wide reference to other writers, living and dead, is balanced by.

Atwood's wide reference to other writers, living and dead, is balanced by anecdotes from her own experiences, both in Canada and elsewhere. The lightness of her touch is offset by a seriousness about the purpose and the pleasures of writing, and by a deep familiarity with the myths and traditions of western literature. Margaret Atwood was born in 1939 in Ottawa and grew up in northern Quebec, Ontario, and Toronto. This book grew out of the series of Empsom lectures that prize-winning novelist Atwood gave at the University of Cambridge in 2000 Читать весь отзыв.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Empson Lectures: Negotiating with the Dead : A.myth and literature make this critical work by Margaret Atwood almost as fascinating as one of her novels.

myth and literature make this critical work by Margaret Atwood almost as fascinating as one of her novels.

The Empson Lectures, named after the great scholar and literary critic Sir . The more I thought about this the worse it became

The Empson Lectures, named after the great scholar and literary critic Sir William Empson (1906-84), have been established by the University of Cambridge as a series designed to address topics of broad literary and cultural interest. 6 Descent: Negotiating with the dead Who makes the trip to the Underworld, and why? Notes. The more I thought about this the worse it became. Writing itself is always bad enough, but writing about writing is surely worse, in the futility department.

Margaret Atwood has. The author of more than 40 works including fiction, poetry and critical essays (including . Most of the quotes listed below are from Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing. The author of more than 40 works including fiction, poetry and critical essays (including one particular book she finished earlier this year that no one can read fo. The book began as a series of lectures at the University of Cambridge that have here been reworked into chapters in which Atwood explores the role of the writer. Aspiring writers of the world: this is one writer you must listen to. On What Writing Is. Margaret Eleanor Atwood is a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor, teacher and environmental activist.

What is the role of the Writer? Prophet? High Priest of Art? Court Jester? Or witness to the real world? Looking back on her own childhood and writing career, Margaret Atwood examines the metaphors which writers of fiction and poetry have used to explain--or excuse!--their activities, looking at what costumes they have assumed, what roles they have chosen to play. In her final chapter she takes up the challenge of the title: if a writer is to be seen as "gifted", who is doing the giving and what are the terms of the gift? Atwood's wide reference to other writers, living and dead, is balanced by anecdotes from her own experiences, both in Canada and elsewhere. The lightness of her touch is offset by a seriousness about the purpose and the pleasures of writing, and by a deep familiarity with the myths and traditions of western literature. Margaret Atwood was born in 1939 in Ottawa and grew up in northern Quebec, Ontario, and Toronto. She received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master's degree from Radcliffe College. Throughout her thirty years of writing, Atwood has received numerous awards and honorary degrees. Hew newest novel, The Blind Assassin, won the 2000 Booker Prize for Fiction. She is the author of more than twenty-five volumes of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction and is perhaps best known for her novels, which include Alias Grace (1996), The Robber Bride (1994), Cat's Eye (1988), The Handmaid's Tale (1983), Surfacing (1972) and The Edible Woman (1970). Acclaimed for her talent for portraying both personal lives and worldly problems of universal concern, Atwood's work has been published in more than thirty-five languages, including Japanese, Turkish, Finnish, Korean, Icelandic, and Estonian.
Comments: (7)
Gindian
This book is a relaxed and learned meditation on writing and being a writer, by an accomplished writer of novels, short stories, poetry, and literary criticism. In it, Margaret Atwood adapts six lectures she gave at the University of Cambridge in 2000. I call it a meditation because there is no central thesis or sustained, linear argument. Rather, the thoughts circle around and refer to and bounce off one another, with all coalescing generally around the medium of writing. Atwood's style is relatively informal and often playful, and she draws upon an impressive - and instructive - range of literary references.

The title of the book is also the title of the last chapter, and is derived from Atwood's hypothesis that "not just some, but ALL writing of the narrative kind * * * is motivated, deep down, by a fear of and a fascination with mortality - by a desire to make the risky trip to the Underworld, and to bring something or some back from the dead." I am a little dubious about what follows the dash in that sentence about trips to the Underworld, at least as applied to ALL writing, but the broader statement that writing is motivated by a fear of and a fascination with mortality makes sense to me. In fact, it articulates a notion that from time to time had occurred to me. And that's the value of the book - not as a how-to guide to writing or a magisterial pronouncement of literary principles a la T.S. Eliot, but as a collection of thought-provoking reflections on writing, which may or may not resonate with you.

Here are three of the comments that I marked as I leisurely made my way through the book:

* "Wanting to meet a author because you like his work is like wanting to meet a duck because you like pâté."

* There is "only one real question to be asked about any work" and that is "is it alive, or is it dead?"

* "Narration - storytelling - is the relation of events unfolding through time. You can't hold a mirror up to Nature and have it be a story unless there's a metronome ticking somewhere. As Leon Edel has noted, if it's a novel, there's bound to be a clock in it."

At times, I felt that Atwood moved too far from the realm of reflection and observation to that of analysis, and I am not sure that the medium of writing lends itself to unpretentious, non-academic analysis. But those moments were relatively infrequent and abbreviated, so that overall I enjoyed NEGOTIATING WITH THE DEAD. Just don't look to it for some sort of satori.
Wohald
I love Margaret Atwood. She is ethereal, like a witty and charming angel. Her voice leaps off the page in this book about how she writes.
I bought this book to review before her appearance in my home town. It is a peek inside her mind and helped me to enjoy her books even more.
Whiteseeker
Smart, funny, not at all dry and right on point, Atwood relays in no uncertain terms what it means to be a writer, how to navigate pitfalls, and what "the rules" mean to real writers. Go on... read it. You'll grow a little.
Oppebro
Atwood is a magical story teller, even in this nonfiction novel about the writer's journey. She is witty and the evidence she uses to support her cases are perfect. It was a great read.
Doomredeemer
Loving this book.
Mardin
as an aspiring writer, and as a woman, I am finding this book beyond inspiring. It discusses not only being a writer, but all the concerns that arise and social expectations involved, etc. A must read.
Nto
Love all of her books.
I love the new perspectives I gained from Atwood. She provides her view of the relationship between the text and the reader, the author and the text, and the reader and the author. She delves into literary theory in way I find approachable. I gained much insight from her literary references (allusions, if you will) and find the endnotes and bibliography to be a treasure trove. At times, I felt a bit disconnected to the text, but after reading a library copy, I need to get my own, so I can write in it.
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