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eBook Young Eliot: From St. Louis to The Waste Land epub

by Robert Crawford

eBook Young Eliot: From St. Louis to The Waste Land epub
  • ISBN: 0374279446
  • Author: Robert Crawford
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (April 7, 2015)
  • Pages: 512 pages
  • ePUB size: 1599 kb
  • FB2 size 1831 kb
  • Formats lit docx azw mobi


The soundscape of St Louis in the late 19th century included Wagner, music hall and ragtime; all found their way into The Waste Land. Crawford has discovered in Eliot’s St Louis many of the names memorialised in his poems – Stetson, Sweany, even Prufrock.

The soundscape of St Louis in the late 19th century included Wagner, music hall and ragtime; all found their way into The Waste Land. Crawford has discovered in Eliot’s St Louis many of the names memorialised in his poems – Stetson, Sweany, even Prufrock

Young Eliot traces the life of the twentieth century's most important poet from his childhood in St. Louis to the publication of his revolutionary poem The Waste Land

Young Eliot traces the life of the twentieth century's most important poet from his childhood in St. Louis to the publication of his revolutionary poem The Waste Land.

11 Drawing on the work of local historians and on untapped archival sources, Young Eliot reveals not just Eliot’s early physical environment but also what it meant to his imagination. With his early teens divided between education in Missouri and summering in Gloucester, Massachusetts, a constant, deepening pleasure for this boy was his love of reading.

Robert Crawford's magnificent biography, Young Eliot, explores anti-Semitic moments in the poetry, but . The biography covers a 20-year period from childhood in the ragtime city of St Louis to 1922, the year of The Waste Land.

Robert Crawford's magnificent biography, Young Eliot, explores anti-Semitic moments in the poetry, but reminds us that during the Second World War Eliot had denounced Hitler's annihilation of European Jewry. The Jew-baiter of Julius's book was thus "conflictedly human" in his views; before all else, however, he was a great poet.

TS Eliot from birth to The Waste Land. Hardly a detail has been left out, filling in many gaps usually ignored about Eliot's childhood, education, first sad marriage, and early poetry

TS Eliot from birth to The Waste Land. Hardly a detail has been left out, filling in many gaps usually ignored about Eliot's childhood, education, first sad marriage, and early poetry. If you love Eliot as I do-the first place I heard of a mysterious substance called curry or the elegant name Lavinia or the word scenario or the wonderful silly English repartee-"The only person I ever met who could hear the cry of bats. Hear the cry of bats? He could hear the cry of bats. Buts how do you know h TS Eliot from birth to The Waste Land. Recently I saw that a new book had been published by Robert Crawford with the title Young Eliot: from St. Louis to The Waste Land

TS Eliot from birth to The Waste Land. Louis to The Waste Land. This book did not turn out to be an easy read. It is an academic book.

Young Eliot tracks in enthralling, exhaustive detail the poet's life up to the book publication of The Waste Land. Earlier biographies have somewhat scanted Eliot's American childhood and youth, which is one reason why this new book is so valuable. It is magisterial in its minutiae. Michael Dirda, The Washington Post.

Robert Crawford's possibly unimprovable recent biography, Young Eliot: From St. Louis to The .

Crawford has taken on an immense task: to tell the story of the poet's poetic development alongside the story of his life, and he succeeds pretty much entirely. The triumph of Robert Crawford's magnificent life of this poet (up through the publication of The Waste Land, when Eliot was 34) is that he brings us close to the poet-his vulnerabilities and harsh defenses-without destroying his allure.

The literary critic I A Richards, who knew the promising poet TS Eliot when the latter was working for Lloyd’s in the City of London, once met a senior bank official by chance at a resort in the Alps. The pair were delighted to find they had a subject in common and so began to discuss young Mr Eliot. The banker, who regarded poetry as Mr Eliot’s eccentric hobby, was so disconcerted to hear Richards’s effusive praise that he countered with a judgment of his own. Young Eliot is doing very well at the bank, he said.

From his Midwest origins, the young . . Eliot moved on to the works that would make his name. Crawford concurs with Eliot’s understanding that the ways in which the ­passions and desires of the creator may be satisfied in the work of art are complex and devious.

A groundbreaking new biography of one of the twentieth century's most important poetsOn the fiftieth anniversary of the death of T. S. Eliot, the award-winning biographer Robert Crawford presents us with the first volume of a comprehensive account of this poetic genius. Young Eliot traces the life of the twentieth century's most important poet from his childhood in St. Louis to the publication of his revolutionary poem The Waste Land. Crawford provides readers with a new understanding of the foundations of some of the most widely read poems in the English language through his depiction of Eliot's childhood―laced with tragedy and shaped by an idealistic, bookish family in which knowledge of saints and martyrs was taken for granted―as well as through his exploration of Eliot's marriage to Vivien Haigh-Wood, a woman who believed she loved Eliot "in a way that destroys us both." Quoting extensively from Eliot's poetry and prose as well as drawing on new interviews, archives, and previously undisclosed memoirs, Crawford shows how the poet's background in Missouri, Massachusetts, and Paris made him a lightning rod for modernity. Most impressively, Young Eliot reveals the way he accessed his inner life―his anguishes and his fears―and blended them with his omnivorous reading to create his masterpieces "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and The Waste Land. At last, we experience T. S. Eliot in all his tender complexity as student and lover, penitent and provocateur, banker and philosopher―but most of all, Young Eliot shows us as an epoch-shaping poet struggling to make art among personal disasters.

Comments: (7)
Silver Globol
Really enjoyed this. I'm not a big bio fan as I'm a believer that the best of a writer is always in their work and knowledge about their personal lives is not always or even often helpful in understanding it. I've made an exception with Eliot, though, as he's my favorite poet. "Young Eliot" differs from most of the rest of Eliot bios in two ways: first, because it's confines itself to the first third of Eliot's life, up to the eve of publication of "The Waste Land," and focuses d on his education both in school and university, and, once out, on his formative years as a writer in Paris and London. As a writer myself, it was inspiring to read the great detail Crawford went into on the literary and educational influences of "young Eliot" -- very insightful.

Second, "Young Eliot" is based almost entirely on secondary sources, out of necessity as all of the principals are dead, and Crawford does an outstanding job of weaving quotations from Eliot's enormous number of published and "private" letters into his exegesis of the period. His research into the places where Eliot lived and visited and into the letters of Eliot's many letter recipients (from the Woolf's to Pound to Joyce and Eliot's own relatives) was carefully done and beautifully woven into the text, really allowing us a blow-by-blow in-the-moment view into Eliot's intellectual and artistic development. There's more detail than I and many others are going to want about Eliot's marriage to Vivien, and to their nearly equally great neuroses, but it does seem like you can't peel that away from Eliot's writing.

For exegesis about Eliot's early development, this volume can't be beat. For strictly critical exegesis of "The Waste Land" and "The Four Quartets," see Helen Gardner's 1950 publication, "The Art of T.S. Eliot." Hands-down, this is still the most perceptive, thorough, and thoughtful review of those poems. Ronald Bush's 1984 character and style study, "T.S. Eliot," is also good. Gardner's slim volume is still the best though. My copy is falling apart but I still enjoy re-reading it every few years. Coming back to "Young Eliot," I'd say it is an enjoyable detailed look at Eliot early development as a poet-thinker. Highly recommended.
LONUDOG
Crawford states at the beginning of this book that there is not much known about T.S. Eliot's early years. Crawford then proceeds to pad the book with every occurence that is even slightly relevant to Eliot. Unless you are researching Eliot's life, you are likely to find this book intricate and boring. If you are researching Eliot's life, look out for the assumptions and trivia.
Usishele
Simply stated, this will most likely be the most thorough biography for some time to come. OK, he was a pioneering genius and there is much to learn and appreciate.

To the point, I found immensely satisfying to first part of the biography which discusses the pre- college days of young Tom because Mr. Crawford does paint a picture of Eliot before he assumed his very proper and intimidating public personae. Yes I liked the kid. If there is too much detail or information, pick and choose but it is nice to know it is all there.
Kagda
One of the finest literary biographies I have ever read, and I read many of them. Essential to anyone interested in Eliot, and guaranteed to create new fans of this great poet.
melody of you
At first the book was tiresomely detailed--every repot card of Elio's grade school, and so on. But the book--and the writer's assiduous research--paid off when Eliot got to London. The reader is given much to think about in terms of writing, friendships, literary connections, and what makes people stay married. I had new insights into Eliot. I wanted the book to continue with his rest of his life, although the title made the limitations clear enough..
Drelajurus
Detailed and resourceful, this is the first biography of Eliot to profit from the ongoing publication of his letters. Crawford doesn't gloss over Eliot's shortcomings (including his antisemitism), but he creates a generous context in which the whole person--not merely the brilliant poet--becomes human, approachable. I look forward to the second volume.
riki
Also gift for my husband and he is loving it
Excellent though perhaps a little too detailed for those who are not academics.
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