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eBook Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination (Medievalism) epub

by David Clark,Nicholas Perkins

eBook Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination (Medievalism) epub
  • ISBN: 1843842513
  • Author: David Clark,Nicholas Perkins
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: D.S.Brewer (October 21, 2010)
  • Pages: 302 pages
  • ePUB size: 1681 kb
  • FB2 size 1570 kb
  • Formats txt mobi doc rtf


David Clark & Nicholas Perkins. Article in Anglia 129(1-2) · August 2011 with 4 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

David Clark & Nicholas Perkins. Cite this publication.

David Clark, Nicholas Perkins. breaks new ground in many areas. Should make a substantial impact on the discussion of the contemporary influence of Anglo-Saxon Culture". Conor McCarthy, author of Seamus Heaney and the Medieval Imagination Britain's pre-Conquest past and its culture continues to fascinate modern writers and artists. From Henry Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader to Seamus Heaney's Beowulf, and from high modernism to the musclebound heroes of comic book and Hollywood, Anglo-Saxon England has been a powerful and often unexpected source.

Conor McCarthy, author of Seamus Heaney and the Medieval Imagination Britain's pre-Conquest past and its culture continues to fascinate modern writers and artists

Conor McCarthy, author of Seamus Heaney and the Medieval Imagination Britain's pre-Conquest past and its culture continues to fascinate modern writers and artists. From Henry Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader to Seamus Heaney's Beowulf, and from high modernism to the musclebound heroes of comic book and Hollywood, Anglo-Saxon England has been a powerful and often unexpected source of inspiration, antagonism, and reflection. The essays here engage with the ways in which the Anglo-Saxons and their literature have been received, confronted, and re-envisioned in the modern imagination

This is a volume in the series Medievalism, which claims to cater for .

This is a volume in the series Medievalism, which claims to cater for monographs and collections which in the multi-disciplinary field of medievalism studies, like work investigating the influence of the medievalism in the culture of later ages.

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oceedings{nCA, title {Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination, ed. David Clark & Nicholas Perkins}, author {Leonard Neidorf}, year {2011} }. Leonard Neidorf. Shippey concludes that the inner aesthetic of alliterative, low-information poetry, long though it lasted and powerful though it remained even in its lates. ONTINUE READING.

Nicholas Perkins and David Clark. In Seamus Heaney’s poem ‘Bone Dreams’, the speaker/dreamer discovers layers of northern and personal history by delving through the linguistic past

Nicholas Perkins and David Clark. In Seamus Heaney’s poem ‘Bone Dreams’, the speaker/dreamer discovers layers of northern and personal history by delving through the linguistic past.

Tolkien's Old English Chronicles 5‘Wounded men and wounded trees' : David Jones and the Anglo-Saxon Culture Tangle 6Basil.

This rich collection of essays looks back to the influence of Anglo-Saxon culture in nineteenth-century and modernist writers, and explores a diverse range of more contemporary 'moments of intersection between past and present. Authors explore the interaction between text, image and landscape in medieval and modern books, the recasting of mythic figures. Tolkien's Old English Chronicles 5‘Wounded men and wounded trees' : David Jones and the Anglo-Saxon Culture Tangle 6Basil Bunting, Briggflatts.

We are fortunate, then, to have David Clark and Nicholas Perkins' Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination, a volume of 14 essays dedicated to excavating and . Brewer, 302pp, £5. 0.

Auden and Ted Hughes, among others, to .

David Clark and Nicholas Perkins, ed. Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination. Medievalism . Cambridge, UK: . Pp. xiv, 382; 11 b&w figs. Andrew Scheil, "Clark, David; and Perkins, Nicholas, ed. Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination," Speculum 88, no. 1 (January 2013): 268-270. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis.

David Clark and Nicholas Perkins, Woodbridge: Boydell, 2010), to which Jones contributed a chapter on Beowulf films . The next two chapters survey medievalism in the early modern period (Mike Rodman Jones), and the romantic era (Clare Simmons)

David Clark and Nicholas Perkins, Woodbridge: Boydell, 2010), to which Jones contributed a chapter on Beowulf films and Heaney's translation. John M. Ganim discusses "the memory and reinvention of the Middle Ages in the built environment including town planning and urban design" (29). The next two chapters survey medievalism in the early modern period (Mike Rodman Jones), and the romantic era (Clare Simmons). Richard Utz contributes a chapter on "Academic medievalism and nationalism" and what one could call the "Philological project. Andrew Lynch writes on medievalism and "the ideology of wa.

`An excellent collection... breaks new ground in many areas. Should make a substantial impact on the discussion of the contemporary influence of Anglo-Saxon Culture'. Conor McCarthy, author of Seamus Heaney and the Medieval Imagination Britain's pre-Conquest past and its culture continues to fascinate modern writers and artists. From Henry Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader to Seamus Heaney's Beowulf, and from high modernism to the musclebound heroes of comic book and Hollywood, Anglo-Saxon England has been a powerful and often unexpected source of inspiration, antagonism, and reflection. The essays here engage with the ways in which the Anglo-Saxons and their literature have been received, confronted, and re-envisioned in the modern imagination. They offer fresh insights on established figures, such as W.H. Auden, J.R.R. Tolkien, and David Jones, and on contemporary writers such as Geoffrey Hill, Peter Reading, P.D. James, and Heaney. They explore the interaction between text, image and landscape in medieval and modern books, the recasting of mythic figures such as Wayland Smith, and the metamorphosis of Beowulf into Grendel - as a novel and as grand opera. The early medieval emerges not simply as a site of nostalgia or anxiety in modern revisions, but instead provides a vital arena for creativity, pleasure, and artistic experiment. Contributors: Bernard O'Donoghue, Chris Jones, Mark Atherton, Maria Artamonova, Anna Johnson, Clare A. Lees, Sian Echard, Catherine A.M. Clarke, Maria Sachiko Cecire, Allen J. Frantzen, John Halbrooks, Hannah J. Crawforth, Joshua Davies, Rebecca Anne Barr
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