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eBook The Body and the Song: Elizabeth Bishop's Poetics (AD FEMINAM) epub

by Marilyn May Lombardi

eBook The Body and the Song: Elizabeth Bishop's Poetics (AD FEMINAM) epub
  • ISBN: 0809318857
  • Author: Marilyn May Lombardi
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (February 20, 1995)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1349 kb
  • FB2 size 1971 kb
  • Formats rtf azw lrf docx


In this original contribution to Elizabeth Bishop studies, Marilyn May Lombardi uses previously unpublished materials (letters, diaries, notebooks, and unfinished poems) to shed new light on the poet’s published work.

In this original contribution to Elizabeth Bishop studies, Marilyn May Lombardi uses previously unpublished materials (letters, diaries, notebooks, and unfinished poems) to shed new light on the poet’s published work. She explores the ways Bishop’s lesbianism, alcoholism, allergic illnesses, and fear of mental instability affected her poetry-the ways she translated her In this original contribution to Elizabeth Bishop studies, Marilyn May Lombardi uses previously unpublished materials (letters, diaries, notebooks, and unfinished poems) to shed new light on the poet’s published work.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Body and the Song . Elizabeth Bishop stares back at me from a grainy, age-flecked photograph.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Body and the Song: Elizabeth Bishop's Poetics. The Body and the Song: Elizabeth Bishop's Poetics. By Marilyn May Lombardi. It is 1954; she is forty-three years old and living in Brazil. We called her 'Bishop,' spoke of her as 'the Bishop,' and we all knew with no doubt whatsoever that she was a genius" (introduction, CProse xii-xiii). From first to last, "the Bishop" hated being photographed and rarely let herself be caught looking directly into a camera. Most snapshots show her in profile or three-quarter view, looking off into some incalculable distance.

The body and the song : Elizabeth Bishop's poetics. Gary Kerley, Marilyn May Lombardi. "In this original contribution to Elizabeth Bishop studies, Marilyn May Lombardi uses previously unpublished materials (letters, diaries, notebooks, and unfinished poems) to shed new light on th. More).

Lombardi, Marilyn May, The Body and the Song: Elizabeth Bishop's Poetics, Southern Illinois University (Carbondale, IL), 1995. Mazzaro, Jerome, Postmodern American Poetry, University of Illinois Press (Champaign, IL), 1980. McCabe, Susan, Elizabeth Bishop: Her Poetics of Loss, Pennsylvania State University Press (University Park, PA), 1994. Millier, Brett . Elizabeth Bishop: Life and the Memory of It, University of California Press, 1995.

10 I. Elizabeth Bishop’s Translations The body of Elizabeth Bishop’s translations is not very large, but it. .

Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979) was an American poet and short-story writer. She was Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1949 to 1950, the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956, the National Book Award winner in 1970, and the recipient of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 1976. Dwight Garner argued that she was perhaps the most purely gifted poet of the 20th century.

Author of Elizabeth Bishop: The Geography of Gender (Feminist Issues : Practice, Politics, Theory), Elizabeth Bishop, The body and the song. Created April 1, 2008.

Personal Name: Lombardi, Marilyn Ma.

Personal Name: Lombardi, Marilyn May. Publication, Distribution, et. Carbondale Ad Feminam: Women and Literature, Sandra M. Gilbert 1. "O Breath": Asthma and Equivocality 2. "The Queer Land of Kissing": Sexuality and Representation 3. The Rose and the Crystal 4. "Abnormal Thirst": Addiction and the Poete Maudit 5. "Travelling Through the Flesh": A Poetics of Translation 6. "Whispering Galleries": The Visual Arts and the Incarnation of Memory 7. "In the Village": Madness and. the Mother's Body 8. Shipwreck and Salvage. Personal Name: Bishop, Elizabeth, 1911-1979 Criticism and interpretation

This book examines the strategic possibilities of poetic self-restraint. In recent years critical studies of Bishop and Moore have flourished, a large percentage of them devoted to explorations of sexuality and gender.

This book examines the strategic possibilities of poetic self-restraint. Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, and May Swenson all wrote poetry that is marked by a certain reserve-precisely the motive against which most feminist poets and critics of the last thirty years have established themselves. Kirstin Hotelling Zona complicates this dichotomy by examining the conceptions of selfhood upon which it depends. A gap is growing, however, between feminist repossessions of Moore and Bishop and recent readings of their antiessentialist poetics.

In this original contribution to Elizabeth Bishop studies, Marilyn May Lombardi uses previously unpublished materials (letters, diaries, notebooks, and unfinished poems) to shed new light on the poet’s published work. She explores the ways Bishop’s lesbianism, alcoholism, allergic illnesses, and fear of mental instability affected her poetry—the ways she translated her bodily experiences into poetic form.

A cornerstone of The Body and the Song is the poet’s thirty-year correspondence with her physician, Dr. Anny Baumann, who was both friend and surrogate mother to Bishop. The letters reveal Bishop’s struggles to understand the relation between her physical and creative drives. "Dr. Anny" also helped Bishop unravel the connections in her life between psychosomatic illness and early maternal deprivation—her mother was declared incurably insane and institutionalized in 1916, when Bishop was five years old. Effectively an orphan, she spent the rest of her childhood with relatives.

In addition to these letters, Lombardi uses Bishop’s unpublished notebooks to demonstrate the poet’s resolve to "face the facts"—to confront her own emotional, intellectual, and physical frailties—and translate them into poetry that is clear-eyed and economical in its form.

Lombardi argues that in her subtle way, Bishop explores the same issues that preoccupy the current generation of women writers. A deeply private artist, Bishop never directly refers to her homosexuality in her published work, but the metaphors she draws from her carnal desires and aversions confront stifling cultural prescriptions for personal and erotic expression. In choosing restraint over confession, Bishop parted company with her friend Robert Lowell, but Lombardi shows that her reticence becomes a powerful artistic strategy resulting in poetry remarkable for its hermeneutic potential.

Informed by recent gender criticism, Lombardi’s lucid argument advances our understanding of the ways the material circumstances of life can be transformed into art.

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