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eBook Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures epub

by Ray Bradbury

eBook Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures epub
  • ISBN: 1877741086
  • Author: Ray Bradbury
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Joshua Odell Editions; Reprint edition (January 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1601 kb
  • FB2 size 1981 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf rtf lit


Thus my subtitle: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures. Which means, further, that one of the reasons I enjoy going through a toy factory is that I am surrounded by nothing but metaphors. Celebrations of joyful concepts.

Thus my subtitle: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures.

Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures. Ray Bradbury is known for his flights of imagination in fiction - as far-flung as Mars and as close as our own backyard, he has imagined worlds for us to enjoy and inhabit in our minds. Which "Why the positive bias?

Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures. 1877741043 (ISBN13: 9781877741043). Which "Why the positive bias? Why the inclination toward optimism?

YESTERMORROW is a collection of essays by Ray Bradbury. Like many of Bradbury's other non-fiction works, YESTERMORROW is a unique blend.

YESTERMORROW is a collection of essays by Ray Bradbury. Some of them are reflections upon places in Bradbury's past while others are musings on dreamed-up future possibilities. In these writings Bradbury touches upon everything from art, literature, history, science fiction, architecture, and music. I enjoy reading Bradbury. He's a gifted American writer who next to Asimov and Verne stands as one of the giants and grandfathers of science fiction writing.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Yestermorrow: Obvious.

Ideas on the Theater of the Future. Imagine a room with 40 men and women seated with empty chairs on either side of them. Eighty chairs in all, but only 40 occupied. It is a robot’s banquet in the year 2010, and I have been invited. I enter and am greeted with a chorus of voices. The men and women at the tables raise their glasses to me and call out. Here, no here, here, no here! And I sit now with Plato, now with Aristotle, now with Emily Dickinson, in a great feasting of thoughts and a banqueting of words.

Torrent details for "Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible . Bradbury reflects on art, literature, history, architecture, science fiction, and the people who have influenced him. xx.

Bradbury reflects on art, literature, history, architecture, science fiction, and the people who have influenced him.

Bradbury, Ray, 1920-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on February 25, 2015.

Visionary writings from the protean Bradbury, America's preeminent master of the fantastic who has enchanted millions of readers worldwide

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Visionary writings from the protean Bradbury, America's preeminent master of the fantastic who has enchanted millions of readers worldwide. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Ray Bradbury (1920 – 2012), one of the most celebrated writers of the 20th Century, was a prolific author of hundreds of short stories and more than three dozen books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays

Ray Bradbury (1920 – 2012), one of the most celebrated writers of the 20th Century, was a prolific author of hundreds of short stories and more than three dozen books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays. His iconic works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award.

Visionary writings from the protean Bradbury, America's preeminent master of the fantastic who has enchanted millions of readers worldwide

Visionary writings from the protean Bradbury, America's preeminent master of the fantastic who has enchanted millions of readers worldwide.

Visionary writings from the protean Bradbury, America's preeminent master of the fantastic who has enchanted millions of readers worldwide. Part memoir, part commentary, these writings are an exploration and celebration of ideas. Bradbury reflects on art, literature, history, architecture, science fiction, and the people who have influenced him.
Comments: (3)
Shomeshet
It arrived in great condition and is being thoroughly enjoyed!
Nuadador
"Why the positive bias? Why the inclination toward optimism? Because optimism has only meant one thing to me - the chance to behave optimally. Hip-deep, that is, in our genetics, we behave up to the limit of our blood and brains. We have done it before. We have done it often." - Ray Bradbury, "Beyond 1984"

Ray Bradbury is known for his flights of imagination in fiction - as far-flung as Mars and as close as our own backyard, he has imagined worlds for us to enjoy and inhabit in our minds. Which is why it shouldn't be a surprise that, when reading a collection of essays and ideas he had about architecture and city planning and why science fiction is important fiction, it should not be a surprise that his imagination is no less rich, no less vibrant. Many of these essays were published previously, not in science fiction magazines, but in publications like 'Designers West' and 'West: The Los Angeles Times Magazine.' In short, these are Bradbury's ideas for us.

In these essays, he laments the loss of connection and hopes for better, envisioning not the stale shopping malls of today but city centers that tease the senses and excite the imagination - we see repeated themes such as bookstores that whisper promises of the stories held within, interactive tours where everyone is an Adventurer through time and place, and soda fountains with a hundred seats. These are not only places to shop, but places to meet and talk and see one another. In other essays, Bradbury praises Walt Disney for creating wonderlands for the pure love of the creation, and Fellini for the way he captured our imagination on film. Reading through them, I couldn't help but be caught up in these concepts and dreams - what if they could happen? What if they were real? What if, what if, what if?

Of course, most of these were written between the 1970's and the early 1990's, and the world has changed since then. In the face of modern technology, many of his ideas seem old-fashioned and quaint. Instead of the Seashell that he wrote of (warned of) in 'Fahrenheit 451,' we have "smartphones" crooning to us and calling to us constantly, pulling us away from one another. Reading these essays, I couldn't help but wonder what Bradbury would think of where we are today - would he marvel at the magical ways we communicate, or would he weep that the core of his ideas were ignored, and we use our technology to build walls rather than pathways?

If his ideas seem old-fashioned, it's probably because they are. Of course they are. And, really, what's wrong with being old-fashioned? In the face of the wall of modernity, a little old-fashioned is like a breath of fresh air sometimes.

If there's one thing I came away with from this collection, it's that Bradbury was full of hope. He would look at the tools we have today, at the world of information at our very fingertips, and rejoice. Libraries we carry with us everywhere? Of course! The ability to say hello to our friends on the other side of the world in real time? Absolutely amazing! And he would admonish us, too - don't lose sight of the magic of the past, of the simple things. Don't forget the soda fountain, the city plaza, the toys and amusements of a child. To Bradbury, Toyland was not a place to leave behind, but a place to be returned to again and again, even if we fear that we've outgrown it.

"Ask me," he says. "I'll show you the way."

And in these small wonders, he does.
Neol
YESTERMORROW is a collection of essays by Ray Bradbury. Some of them are reflections upon places in Bradbury's past while others are musings on dreamed-up future possibilities. In these writings Bradbury touches upon everything from art, literature, history, science fiction, architecture, and music. Like many of Bradbury's other non-fiction works, YESTERMORROW is a unique blend. I enjoy reading Bradbury. He's a gifted American writer who next to Asimov and Verne stands as one of the giants and grandfathers of science fiction writing. That's not to say, however, that YESTERMORROW is without its faults. The book was originally published in 1991, therefore all of the writings were written before 1990. Some of the essays, especially the ones musing about the future, actually seem dated now. The world is a far drastic place than it was in 1990, but all the changes haven't been far the better. It is a brave, grim world in which we live now. Nevertheless, despite this, one cannot fault the soulful optimism in which Bradbury writes. Personally, I think the strongest pieces in the book are "The Renaissance Prince and the Baptist Martian" in which Bradbury writes about his relationship with Renaissance scholar Bernard Berenson, "Federico Fellini" where Bradbury talks about the genius of Fellini's filmmaking, and "The Hipbone of Abraham L" which describes Bradbury's relationship with the Walt Disney company and how he came in possession of Abraham Lincoln's hipbone. YESTERMORROW probably isn't a book that an average reader will enjoy, but it is a book that fans of Bradbury and those interested in the history of popular culture can take something away.
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