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eBook Milton, Spenser and the Chronicles of Narnia: Literary Sources for the C.S. Lewis Novels epub

by Elizabeth Baird Hardy

eBook Milton, Spenser and the Chronicles of Narnia: Literary Sources for the C.S. Lewis Novels epub
  • ISBN: 0786428767
  • Author: Elizabeth Baird Hardy
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company (December 13, 2006)
  • Pages: 196 pages
  • ePUB size: 1829 kb
  • FB2 size 1224 kb
  • Formats lit txt lrf lrf


In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of children's stories that became The Chronicles of Narnia. Arguably the two most influential sources for the series are Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queen and John Milton's Paradise Lost

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of children's stories that became The Chronicles of Narnia. The now vastly popular Chronicles are a widely known testament to the religious and moral principles that Lewis embraced in his later life. Arguably the two most influential sources for the series are Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queen and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Lewis was so personally intrigued by these two particular pieces of literature that he became renowned for his scholarly studies of both Milton and Spenser.

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of children’s stories that became The Chronicles of Narnia. Arguably the two most influential sources for the series are Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queen and John Milton’s Paradise Lost

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of children’s stories that became The Chronicles of Narnia. Arguably the two most influential sources for the series are Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queen and John Milton’s Paradise Lost.

Elizabeth Baird Hardy's book, 'Milton, Spencer, and The Chronicles of Narnia. is an invaluable resource for two of the more important springs of Narniad scenery, meaning, and the cast of characters.

The Chronicles of Narnia were influenced by Spenser's The Faerie Queen and Milton's Paradise Lost. Lewis became renowned for studies of both authors. Examines Lewis's echo of each book, and how each conveys similar meanings. Chapters focus on the depiction of evil, female characters, fantastic and symbolic landscapes and settings, and the spiritual concepts important to Lewis" Provided by publisher. Personal Name: Lewis, C. S. (Clive Staples), 1898-1963. Personal Name: Spenser, Edmund, 1552?-1599 Influence.

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of allegorical .

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of allegorical children's stories that became ""The Chronicles of Narnia"". The now vastly popular ""Chronicles"" are a widely known testament to the religious and moral principles that Lewis embraced in his later life. Arguably, the two most influential sources for the series are Edmund Spenser's ""The Faerie Queen"" and John Milton's ""Paradise Lost"". This book examines the important ways in which Lewis so clearly echoes ""The Faerie Queen"" and ""Paradise Lost"", and how the elements of each work together to convey similar meanings.

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of children's stories that became The Chronicles of Narnia.

New Arrivals & Forthcoming Books: January 2007. Kissing Sin by Keri Arthur Dell, Bantam Spectra (mm, 357 pages) Publication date: 6 February 2007, USA & Canada. Dangerous Games by Keri Arthur Dell, Bantam Spectra (mm, 357 pages) Publication date (forthcoming): 27 March 2007, USA & Canada.

First published in Great Britain in 1998 by Collins"-Verso . The magician's nephew - The lion, the witch, and the wardrobe - The horse and his boy - Prince Caspian - The voyage of the Dawn Treader - The silver chair - The last battle.

Hardy, Elizabeth Baird (December 13, 2006). Milton, Spenser and the Chronicles of Narnia: Literary Sources for the . McFarland & Company.

In 1950, Clive Staples Lewis published the first in a series of children's stories that became The Chronicles of Narnia. The now vastly popular Chronicles are a widely known testament to the religious and moral principles that Lewis embraced in his later life. What many readers and viewers do not know about the Chronicles is that a close reading of the seven-book series reveals the strikingly effective influences of literary sources as diverse as George MacDonald's fantastic fiction and the courtly love poetry of the High Middle Ages. Arguably the two most influential sources for the series are Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queen and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Lewis was so personally intrigued by these two particular pieces of literature that he became renowned for his scholarly studies of both Milton and Spenser. This book examines the important ways in which Lewis so clearly echoes The Faerie Queen and Paradise Lost, and how the elements of each work together to convey similar meanings. Most specifically, the chapters focus on the telling interweavings that can be seen in the depiction of evil, female characters, fantastic and symbolic landscapes and settings, and the spiritual concepts so personally important to C.S. Lewis.
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