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eBook The Colored Cartoon: Black Presentation in American Animated Short Films, 1907-1954 epub

by Christopher P. Lehman

eBook The Colored Cartoon: Black Presentation in American Animated Short Films, 1907-1954 epub
  • ISBN: 155849779X
  • Author: Christopher P. Lehman
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (October 7, 2009)
  • Pages: 156 pages
  • ePUB size: 1130 kb
  • FB2 size 1400 kb
  • Formats mbr lit mbr azw


In 'The Colored Cartoon' Lehman analyzes the depiction of black people in classic animated cartoons. His study is interesting and insightful, if a little shallow, mainly because of the paucity of source material, as only a few cartoons feature black-face gags or black characters.

In 'The Colored Cartoon' Lehman analyzes the depiction of black people in classic animated cartoons. Unfortunately his book has numerous flaws. First, Lehman forgets to describe the tradition of black representation the animated cartoons fall in, assuming that most readers will know Uncle Tom, the minstrel heritage and its associated music.

From the introduction of animated film in the early 1900s to the 1950s, ethnic humor was a staple of Americanmade .

From the introduction of animated film in the early 1900s to the 1950s, ethnic humor was a staple of Americanmade cartoons. He argues that what is in many ways most distinctive about American animation reflects white animators' visual interpretations of African American cultural expression. The first American animators drew on popular black representations, many of which were.

Chapter 5: Black Representation and World War II Political Concerns - Chapter 6: African American . About the author (2007). Christopher P. Lehman is associate professor of ethnic studies at Saint Cloud State University. Bibliographic information.

Chapter 5: Black Representation and World War II Political Concerns - Chapter 6: African American Representation and Changing Race Relations - Chapter 7: United Productions and the End of Animated Black Representation - Conclusion: The Legacy of Animated African American Expression. The Colored Cartoon: Black Representation in American Animated Short Films, 1907-1954.

From the introduction of animated film in the early 1900s to the 1950s, ethnic humor was a staple of American-made .

From the introduction of animated film in the early 1900s to the 1950s, ethnic humor was a staple of American-made cartoons.

Christopher P. Lehman’s The Colored Cartoon seeks to explicate the intimate ties between American animation and white racist culture

Christopher P. Lehman’s The Colored Cartoon seeks to explicate the intimate ties between American animation and white racist culture. According to Lehman, ‘‘American animation owes its existence to Af- rican Americans’’ (1); however, African Americans rarely had a hand in the production of the cartoons themselves. Instead, they were a pres- ence through a body of caricatures and stereotypes white animators relied on as the staple diet of the new art form.

The Colored Cartoon book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Colored Cartoon: Black Representation in American Animated Short Films, 1907-1954 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

You are at: AL. rg AWARDSGRANTS The colored cartoon: black representation in American . Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): The colored cartoon: black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954

You are at: AL. rg AWARDSGRANTS The colored cartoon: black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954. Book, Print & Media Awards. Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): The colored cartoon: black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954. ISBN of the winning item: 9781558496132. What type of media is this winner?: Book. Winner Detail Create Date: Monday, January 24, 2011 - 02:56. Lehman. Get started today for free.

From the introduction of animated film in the early 1900s to the 1950s, ethnic humor was a staple of American-made cartoons. Yet as Christopher Lehman shows in this revealing study, the depiction of African Americans in particular became so inextricably linked to the cartoon medium as to influence its evolution through those five decades. He argues that what is in many ways most distinctive about American animation reflects white animators' visual interpretations of African American cultural expression. The first American animators drew on popular black representations, many of which were caricatures rooted in the culture of southern slavery. During the 1920s, the advent of the sound-synchronized cartoon inspired animators to blend antebellum-era black stereotypes with the modern black cultural expressions of jazz musicians and Hollywood actors. When the film industry set out to desexualize movies through the imposition of the Hays Code in the early 1930s, it regulated the portrayal of African Americans largely by segregating black characters from others, especially white females. At the same time, animators found new ways to exploit the popularity of African American culture by creating animal characters like Bugs Bunny who exhibited characteristics associated with African Americans without being identifiably black. By the 1950s, protests from civil rights activists and the growing popularity of white cartoon characters led animators away from much of the black representation on which they had built the medium. Even so, animated films today continue to portray African American characters and culture, and not necessarily in a favorable light. Drawing on a wide range of sources, including interviews with former animators, archived scripts for cartoons, and the films themselves, Lehman illustrates the intimate and unmistakable connection between African Americans and animation.Choice
Comments: (6)
Coiril
Well researched and easy to read summary of the history of racism in early American cartoons.
Redfury
good book
Gribandis
Waste of money. There are many other well written books on the market that are much more informative. I wasted my money on this one..
Bladecliff
The only samples of actual racist cartoons,as far as artwork goes is on the cover-which is a little disappointing...after all,a picture is worth a thousand words. Particularly when illustrating the unbridled racism that existed in the 20's,30's,40's and on up to the 60's.
Qusicam
In 'The Colored Cartoon' Lehman analyzes the depiction of black people in classic animated cartoons. His study is interesting and insightful, if a little shallow, mainly because of the paucity of source material, as only a few cartoons feature black-face gags or black characters. Unfortunately his book has numerous flaws.

First, Lehman forgets to describe the tradition of black representation the animated cartoons fall in, assuming that most readers will know Uncle Tom, the minstrel heritage and its associated music. Moreover he overplays the role of black representation in the animated cartoon, especially when placing Bugs Bunny in a black tradition. Because he anachronistically attributes bebop influences to the rabbit's character, his argumentation is very weak to say the least.

Likewise, Lehman suggests that Donald Duck's role as a bad soldier is rooted in a black representation tradition, as if it were not possible for white people to be bad soldiers! Several 1930's Laurel & Hardy films defy that statement.

But Lehman's biggest flaw is that he ignores all instances of cannibals in animated cartoons. Cannibals were the most common and most backward representations of black people, but Lehman sticks to Afro-American representations, only.

This is a major omission, especially when Lehman describes the Betty Boop cartoon 'I'll Be Glad When You're Dead You Rascal You' (1932). Lehman praises it as one of the cartoons to feature real black entertainers, in this case Louis Armstrong. But he fails to notice that in this cartoon Louis Armstrong and his band are directly linked to most backward images of black cannibals, thus degrading the entertainer and his musicians severely.

I suspect that the cannibals had a more devastating influence on black representation in film than all the Mammies and Sambos Lehman raves against.
Ance
The New Heart Disease Handbook provides a very understandable and insightful introduction into the subject of heart disease. Dr. Cannon covers a broad range of topics including Heart Attacks, Cholesterol, Diabetes and High Blood Pressure in an easy to understand manner. For the first time I believe I actually understand some of the basic concepts that are critical to developing a healthy lifestyle. Dr. Cannon is an expert on this subject and his knowledge comes through without intimidating the reader. This book is absolutely a must read for those interested in these topics.
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