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eBook The Claverings: A Novel (1866) epub

by Anthony Trollope

eBook The Claverings: A Novel (1866) epub
  • ISBN: 1104553007
  • Author: Anthony Trollope
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (May 10, 2009)
  • Pages: 212 pages
  • ePUB size: 1312 kb
  • FB2 size 1131 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi doc lit


The Claverings is a novel by Anthony Trollope, written in 1864 and published in 1866–67.

The Claverings is a novel by Anthony Trollope, written in 1864 and published in 1866–67. It is the story of a young man starting out in life, who must find himself a profession and a wife; and of a young woman who makes a marriage of convenience and must accept the consequences of her decision. Harry Clavering is the only son of Reverend Henry Clavering, a well-to-do clergyman and the paternal uncle of the affluent baronet Sir Hugh Clavering.

The Claverings is a novel about a young man starting out in life, who must find himself a profession and a. .

The Claverings is a novel about a young man starting out in life, who must find himself a profession and a wife; and of a young woman who made a marriage of convenience and must abide the consequences.

Anthony Trollope bibliography. Anthony Trollope, 1864. This is a bibliography of the works of Anthony Trollope. 1867 Reprinted: New York: The Macmillan Company, 1926 (with an introduction by James I. Osborne).

The Claverings: A Novel (1866)Hardcover – 7 August 2014. by Anthony Trollope(Author). The main romance in this book is between Harry Claverling and Florence. This has all the ups and downs of a usual Trollope book and a very happy ending, of course

The Claverings: A Novel (1866)Hardcover – 7 August 2014. This has all the ups and downs of a usual Trollope book and a very happy ending, of course. For those who are new to Trollope, this is not a spoiler. He always has a happy ending with wedding bells ringing throughout the land). What sets this book apart, in my estimation, is the romance between Mr. Saul and Fanny. I've read this book any number of times and each time I am touched by Mr. Saul's steadfast love.

by. Anthony trollope. Showing why harry clavering was wanted at the rectory. The Struggles of Brown, Jones, and Robinson. II. Harry clavering chooses his profession.

fear, to the attacks of mice. Встречается в книгах (9) с 1867 по 2000. Стр. 70 - She had, at any rate been loved once ; and she almost wished that she had taken the money, that she might now have an opportunity of repaying it.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Anthony Trollope You can read The Claverings: a Novel by Anthony Trollope in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12.

I consider the story as a whole to he good, though I am not aware that the public ever corroborated that verdict

I consider the story as a whole to he good, though I am not aware that the public ever corroborated that verdict. the author The Claverings is the best wrought of the novels designed for The Cornhill, and as surely conceived as any book he ever wrote.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Comments: (7)
Akinohn
The Claverings, published in 1867, is the thirteenth novel by the great Victorian writer Anthony Trollope. The reader must pay close attention to the opening chapter, in which the young and beautiful Julia Brabazon jilts Harry Clavering, a handsome and intelligent young man just beginning his career after a remarkable success at Oxford. Julia tells Harry that she gives him up for wealth and a title, which she prefers over the poverty she thinks she will endure as Harry's wife. Everything important that follows in the novel proceeds from this choice, which turns out to be disastrous for Julia. Her husband, Lord Ongar, is a villain who mistreats her, plots to ruin her reputation, and then dies, leaving Julia wealthy and titled, but truly miserable and alone.

While Julia was suffering humiliation and abuse, Harry had started his career as a civil engineer and had fallen in love and proposed marriage to Florence Burton, one of Trollope's truly good and innocent female characters. Unfortunately for Florence, Julia returns from Italy and begins a new romance with Harry, a mistake he will live to regret. This love triangle is the heart and soul of The Claverings and is interesting, but not my reason for recommending this novel.

The minor cast of characters, particularly the eccentric and villainous Sophie Gordeloupe, friend and sometimes confidant of Julia, are truly delightful and at times laugh out loud funny. For example, in one scene Sophie wheedles money from Archie Clavering, Harry's cousin, who wants to use Sophie to help him marry Julia. Later Captain Boodle goes to Sophie to try to get the better of Sophie for his friend Archie. Sophie is too clever for both of these inept and foolish men and the scenes where she bests them are truly delightful. I have read nineteen of Trollope's novels and none of them have the eccentricity and humor of The Claverings. Perhaps the closest we can come to match Sophie for villainous behavior is the great Mrs. Proudie of Barchester Towers.

Part of Trollope's genius in Claverings was to include humor to balance the desperation of Julia, Harry, and Florence, which comprises the main action and suspense of the novel. Who will Harry choose? The patient reader must wait until the very end of the story for this question to be answered.

I enjoyed reading The Claverings, especially for its humor. It is an early novel of Trollope and shows us just what we can expect in his later work. He is a shrewd observer of people. His characters come to life for us and they are as real to us as our own friends and neighbors. He shares his insights and observations about the human condition with us, his readers, as if he himself were our old friend and confidant. Trollope does not go out of style. Like Jane Austen, he continues to find an audience in each new generation. Those new to Trollope will find The Claverings to be a good example of the work of the master. Those who know and love Trollope will find in this novel one more reason to extol the virtues of this master of Victorian literature.
Manona
This is not Trollope's best, but even his worse rates a 5 star.

If Trollope were writing today, his work would be called Chick Lit. It has all the same misunderstandings, humor and missed opportunities of that genre. What sets him apart from Sophie Kinsella, for example, is that his work has much more world building. You feel immersed in Victorian England. It's almost a shock to look up from the page and find yourself in the 21th century.

The main romance in this book is between Harry Claverling and Florence. This has all the ups and downs of a usual Trollope book and a very happy ending, of course. (For those who are new to Trollope, this is not a spoiler. He always has a happy ending with wedding bells ringing throughout the land)

What sets this book apart, in my estimation, is the romance between Mr. Saul and Fanny. I've read this book any number of times and each time I am touched by Mr. Saul's steadfast love. "He was a man who, having once loved, would love on to the end."

Mr. Saul in his rusty black clothes, with is 70 pounds a year is a better, more honest lover than Harry with all his advantages. He sees the rather plain Fanny as the "fairest woman he had ever seen" Unlike Harry who is constantly comparing Florence to Lady Ongar and worrying that he may be picking the wrong woman.

Harry's mother rushes his wedding at the end because even she knows that Harry may wander off to another woman if he's not married right away. On the other hand Mr. Saul says to Fanny "You may at any rate understand this, that I love you with all my Heart and all my strength. If things prosper with me, all my prosperity shall be for you." and you know he means it, even though he may be separated from his love for years.

Mr. Saul may be somewhat of a clerical prig and a bore, but he loves Fanny and will do whatever it takes to make her happy. And I love him for it.

What this book, along with Trollope's entire opus, brings to mind is: How did these guys ever manage to get an empire? None of them work. Harry sort of gets a job then doesn't show up at the office very often and doesn't get fired. Hugh doesn't do anything at all. Mr. Claverling occasionally gives a sermon, but mostly Mr. Saul does that. All these men seem to hang out, drink wine and hunt. None of the upper classes seem to work. Of course the lower classes did the heavy lifting, but doesn't someone from the ruling class have to give orders?

Read this if you want a look at a different culture, a happy romance and really good writing.
Madis
The book itself is WONDERFUL. I would give it 5 stars--one of Trollope's best, in my opinion. I cannot say much, however, for this edition. The misspellings throughout were appalling. Aren't these books supposed to be edited?
Ferri - My name
The Claverings is a story of a young man who is jilted by the woman he loves because she prefers to marry into money. He moves on with his life and becomes engaged to a lovely young woman with no dowry. When woman #1 returns a rich widow, our hero is faced with a decision. Will he choose wealth and beauty over faithfulness and goodness?

I had a hard time appreciating Harry Clavering, a double-minded man when it came to love and marriage. As I watched him waffle on his engagement to Girl #2 when Girl#1 re-enters the scene, I wished for a hero with more backbone. (Septimus Harding, Dr. Thorne and Plantagenet Palliser are men from other Trollope novels who are not perfect, but, nevertheless, are men of conviction.)

As usual, Trollope intersperses his narrative with subtle witticisms as well as not-so-gentle jabs at the filthy rich.
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