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eBook The Master of the World epub

by 1stworld Library,Jules Verne

eBook The Master of the World epub
  • ISBN: 1421817853
  • Author: 1stworld Library,Jules Verne
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literary
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: 1st World Library - Literary Society (May 22, 2006)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1235 kb
  • FB2 size 1767 kb
  • Formats lit rtf mobi azw


Jules Verne Virtual Library. The following texts are electronic versions of Jules Verne works stored locally in our web site and either original or collected from various Internet sources (which are duely acknowledged).

Jules Verne Virtual Library. Many of the items are marked by a icon.

Written shortly before Verne’s death, The Master of the World has a dark and pessimistic tone. After creating so many fantastical inventions in his previous novels, perhaps this short novel serves as Jules Verne’s warning to us about the danger of technology in the wrong hands. If I think of it that way, I like The Master of the World a little better. I listened to Brilliance Audio’s recent version of The Master of the World which was nicely, but not brilliantly, narrated by Jim Killavey.

Jules Verne wrote this book in 1876 and a 130 years later it is still being read and treasured. The inclusion by Vern of the two newspaper reporters from England and France in several stages of the book was an interesting twist of comedy in a generally serious book

Jules Verne wrote this book in 1876 and a 130 years later it is still being read and treasured. The reason why this adventure tale has such long legs is that Verne crafts his story around a great narrative devise. The inclusion by Vern of the two newspaper reporters from England and France in several stages of the book was an interesting twist of comedy in a generally serious book. Those that have not had an opportunity to listen to audio books on CD or MP3CD would be delighted with this one to start. Naration by John Bolen is as usual superior especially with male voices.

Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 14:25. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia.

LibriVox recording of The Master of the World, by Jules Verne. All we need is the price of a paperback book to sustain a non-profit library the whole world depends on. We’re dedicated to reader privacy. Read by Mark F. Smith. Chief Inspector Strock gets the tough cases.

The inclusion by Vern of the two newspaper reporters from England and France in several stages of the book was an interesting twist of comedy in a generally serious book

The inclusion by Vern of the two newspaper reporters from England and France in several stages of the book was an interesting twist of comedy in a generally serious book. His female voices sometimes can be too high pitched and shrill but once one has become a regular Tantor listener, it falls out of the conscious.

Strange events are occurring around the world, involving lights, sounds and flags that are hung in seemingly impossible to get to locations. At the meeting of the Weldon Institute in Philadelphia, Uncle Prudent (President) and Phil Evans (Secretary) and the membership debate about whether their balloon the Goahead, should have its directional screw located in the front or the back. A man called Robur interrupts and takes over their meeting; he insists that to master the skies, a flying vehicle must be heavier than air.

Published in 1904, The Master of the World is the penultimate novel in the Voyages Extraordinaires series, by renowned French novelist and pioneer of science fiction, Jules Verne

Published in 1904, The Master of the World is the penultimate novel in the Voyages Extraordinaires series, by renowned French novelist and pioneer of science fiction, Jules Verne. The novel acts as a sequel to Verne’s novel Robur the Conqueror, and consequently brings back some of its most notable characters, including the brilliant, yet villainous inventor Robur.

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If I speak of myself in this story, it is because I have been deeply involved in its startling events, events doubtless among the most extraordinary which this twentieth century will witness. Sometimes I even ask myself if all this has really happened, if its pictures dwell in truth in my memory, and not merely in my imagination. In my position as head inspector in the federal police department at Washington, urged on moreover by the desire, which has always been very strong in me, to investigate and understand everything which is mysterious, I naturally became much interested in these remarkable occurrences. And as I have been employed by the government in various important affairs and secret missions since I was a mere lad, it also happened very naturally that the head of my department placed In my charge this astonishing investigation, wherein I found myself wrestling with so many impenetrable mysteries.
Comments: (7)
Leceri
A graphic novel adaptation of Jules Verne's story about strange events rocking towns in the US. There's rumblings coming from a mountain in the Smokies. There's an insanely fast car zooming around, and also something on bodies of water equally fast and dangerous. Inspector John Strock is sent to first check out the mountain in the Smokies, and then to investigate the other dangers. Eventually he figures out they're all connected, which is confirmed by letters from a man proclaiming himself to be Master of the World. Strock has to get to the bottom of things before this Master of the World gets truly dangerous.

From what I remember (it's been a long time since I read the original) this does justice to the basic plot of the original Verne tale. The illustrations in this were both amusing and made me shake my head. Wisconsin is portrayed with brown mountains. The Smokies look like a tropical rainforest, and there's a lake in Kansas surrounded by mountains that features in the story. Since the Kansas lake part was in Verne's original tale, I'm guessing that the artists decided to make everything look a bit different from reality. (Of course, these Campfire graphic novels are produced in India, so it's entirely possible they have no clue what Wisconsin or the Smokies are like. But other Campfires I've read have done a decent job with setting, so I'm giving them the benefit of the doubt that it was on purpose.) It was also hard to pinpoint the time period by dress, accessories, cars, etc. Either way, be prepared to take the geography and time period as an alternate universe setting, not a real time or place. Which is fitting for a Verne story.
monotronik
the novel starts much like other verne novels with a natural phenomenon that can not be explained. in this novel, the strange phenomenon is sudden presumed volcanic activity in the mountain called the great eyrie, located in north carolina. in what appears to be a volcanic eruption, a mysterious object flapping it wings, flies away at great speed. as usual in other verne novels, the possibility that this phenomenon is man-made is quickly dismissed. an attempt to scale the mountain to investigate is unsuccessful.

meanwhile, on the prairies of wisconsin, a race by the automobile club is interrupted by an apparition moving nearly two hundred miles per hour. in the waters of new england, a new type of boat is seen darting the waters; and in a mountain lake, a strange submarine vessel now rests. the source of all these strange phenomenon are all one in the same - the 'terror', a vehicle that can traverse the land, sea and the air.

the inventor of this machine declines all offers from all governments to buy his invention and declares himself, 'master of the world'.

a good enough idea for a plot, but it's too short (127 pages). also, much of the book is devoted to either realizing what the terror actually is and how to possibly catch it. comparatively little is spent explaining how the 'terror' functions, how the master of the world was going to achieve his goals of world dominance; and ultimately the ending is felt very rushed too.

perhaps since it is a sequel to one of verne's earlier novels, 'robur the conqueror', verne felt it less necessary for exposition. this should probably be read as one novel, much like 'from the earth to the moon' and 'round the moon'.
Ttexav
Originally posted at Fantasy Literature.

First published in French in 1904 and in English in 1911, The Master of the World is another of Jules Verne’s adventure novels with an SFF twist. It’s a sequel to Robur the Conqueror, though it’s not necessary to have read that book first (I didn’t). The story is set in 1903 and, as so many of Verne’s novels do, features fantastical machines and gadgetry. It should be of particular interest to those who love steampunk and to Verne’s fans who want to read one of the author’s last novels.

Verne’s hero is John Strock, a brave and clever man who investigates mysteries for the government. Currently there are a few strange occurrences going on in the United States. In the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina there is a mountain that nearby residents claim has been heard to rumble and seen to smoke. It acts like a volcano, but our investigator knows that a volcano in that area is unlikely. When he tries to explore the mountain, he finds nothing peculiar, but he discovers that an unknown airplane has also been in the vicinity. Meanwhile, in other areas, an extremely fast car has been sighted — or actually, not very well sighted since it’s going almost too fast to be seen. Citizens are worried about such a hazard on the roads. And in various bodies of water around the country, a mysterious submarine-type vessel has also been spotted. Are all these strange events related? Well, of course they are! And it’s up to our daring hero to figure it all out….

Except he doesn’t really figure it out. While snooping around, he gets captured by Robur, the famous inventor who is at the heart of the mystery. Robur is obviously mad so, like the scientists who encountered the inventor in Robur the Conqueror, Strock feels the need to escape. Which he doesn’t really do, either.

The Master of the World isn’t one of Verne’s best novels. It’s got a couple of great scenes (including an exciting chase at Niagara Falls), but it’s slow to wind up and then the end is quick and anticlimactic. John Strock, despite his supposed talent, has little agency in the story, which I found disappointing. He doesn’t really accomplish anything he sets out to do. Instead he just stumbles upon the answers. The “science” is particularly bad, but that’s partly explained by the age of the novel. Mainly, the story just isn’t as much fun and adventurous as we’d expect from Verne.

Written shortly before Verne’s death, The Master of the World has a dark and pessimistic tone. After creating so many fantastical inventions in his previous novels, perhaps this short novel serves as Jules Verne’s warning to us about the danger of technology in the wrong hands. If I think of it that way, I like The Master of the World a little better.

I listened to Brilliance Audio’s recent version of The Master of the World which was nicely, but not brilliantly, narrated by Jim Killavey.
Prinna
Weird. I had to look up the date of writing. (1904) It's unusual for Verne to be off on his characterizations; for once he gets Americans all wrong. In spite of all of that, it's interesting. Within a year or so, heavier-than-air craft would fly. But he came up with an interesting design for an aircraft: an internal ducted fan (he calls it turbine) in the inner part of a fixed wing for VTOL and an ornithoper-driven outer wing. Might be worth trying.
krot
Not anything like the movie. Wish their was a 3rd book to the story. Worth reading. The terror is one amazing machine.
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