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eBook All We Need of Hell: A Novel epub

by Harry Crews

eBook All We Need of Hell: A Novel epub
  • ISBN: 0060914602
  • Author: Harry Crews
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Reprint edition (April 1, 1988)
  • ePUB size: 1645 kb
  • FB2 size 1911 kb
  • Formats rtf mbr txt docx


Having just reread All We Need of Hell, I am struck by what I think Harry Crews accomplishes better than any other contemporary - he creates real bodies

Having just reread All We Need of Hell, I am struck by what I think Harry Crews accomplishes better than any other contemporary - he creates real bodies. What is it like when it is angry - what are its characteristics? His description and dialogue seem to be built out from this basis. That being said, All We Need of Hell is one helluva physical book. Not only is he main character (like Crews himself) a lifelong amatuer athelete with a self destructive bent, but much of the action is purely physical and centers around running, handball, sex, fighting and some clearly 'slapstick' physical humour. This is a rich and satisfying book.

Harry Crews is clearly a funny bastard, one who writes in lean, contemptuous prose, but the narrative of this short novel is not very strong

Harry Crews is clearly a funny bastard, one who writes in lean, contemptuous prose, but the narrative of this short novel is not very strong. Rather, it's more focused on being a character study about a man's realisation that he's living in something like a echo-chamber, and that his entire construction of reality is a fake thing, separated long ago from real happiness and connection.

Harry Crews Best Novel: Tragically Out of Print. com User, January 29, 2000. I read All We Need of Hell about 10 years ago. Borrowed the copy from my local library. Having just reread All We Need of Hell, I am struck by what I think Harry Crews accomplishes better than any other contemporary - he creates real bodies.

Find sources: "Harry Crews" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2011) (Learn how and . All We Need of Hell, 1987. The Knockout Artist, 1988.

Find sources: "Harry Crews" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Crews felt strongly that authors should write about experiences that they have actually had. In his personal life, he often moved from obsession to obsession, and became knowledgeable on many subjects. The Mulching of America, 1995. The Gospel Singer/Where Does One Go When One Has No Place Left to Go, 1995.

Harper & Row, 1987.

In 1968, Crews published his first novel The Gospel Singer, and over the next eight years, published seven more. After completing his most celebrated work A Childhood in 1978, and committing himself to writing non-fiction and several unproduced screenplays, Crews did not publish another major novel until All We Need of Hell in 1987. Except for library collections and used book dealers, finding certain books by Crews can be difficult. Harper & Row, 1987.

Harry Crews was born in Georgia on June 7, 1935. His childhood was marked by both physical and emotional pain. For the next 10 years, Crews published a novel almost every year, including Karate Is a Thing of the Spirit (1971), Car (1972), and The Gypsy's Curse (1974)

Harry Crews was born in Georgia on June 7, 1935. When he was two years old, he put lye in his mouth, burning his lips and tongue. Later, he was scalded with boiling water. At the age of five, his legs tightened up, pulling his heels to the backs of his thighs; he remained in bed like this for six weeks. For the next 10 years, Crews published a novel almost every year, including Karate Is a Thing of the Spirit (1971), Car (1972), and The Gypsy's Curse (1974). A Feast of Snakes (1976) questions the future of a person who does not escape a pain-wracked childhood.

See contact information and details about Harry Crews . The Enthusiast, 1981 Two By Crews, 1984 Where Does One Go When There's No Place Left to Go?, 1995/1998 Autobiography nd went on to create a singularly unique voice of fiction.

Harry Crews (1935-2012) was interviewed by artist and filmmaker Tyler .

Harry Crews (1935-2012) was interviewed by artist and filmmaker Tyler Turkle at his Gainesville, Florida, home in 2006 and 2007 – the result is this fascinatingly candid 30-minute documentary that covers the triumphs and tragedies of the legendary author of such classics as The Gospel Singer, The Hawk is Dying, A Feast of Snakes, All We Need of Hell and other. I first discovered the works of Harry Crews quite by accident in the early 1980s. I was horrified to find out that the three Crews novels listed in the card catalog of the college library had all been ripped off by obsessed students who had come before me.

Harry Crews obituary. He finally stopped drinking, and returned to novels with two of his best books, All We Need of Hell (1987) and The Knockout Artist (1988)

Harry Crews obituary. American novelist whose southern gothic tales featured the requisite Bible-thumpers, snake-oil sellers and rednecks. He finally stopped drinking, and returned to novels with two of his best books, All We Need of Hell (1987) and The Knockout Artist (1988). Gradually winding down his teaching, Crews retired from the Florida faculty in 1997. His last novel, A Celebration, was published in 1998. He is survived by his son, Byron, also a professor of literature. Harry Crews, writer, born 7 June 1935; died 28 March 2012.

Chronicles the story of Duffy Deeter, a Florida lawyer obsessed with fitness and images of death; his wife Tish, a platinum blond having an affair with his law partner, and Duffy's girlfriend Marvella, a coke-snorting nymphet
Comments: (7)
Kamuro
Harry Crews was an F-ing hilarious graphic and literary genius. Everything I've read of his takes me about half the time to read than most anything else. I'm compelled and can't put his books down waiting for the next ridiculously amusing thing to happen. Sex, drugs, hillbillies, up tight frat boys, and there is always a bottle of Jack Daniels getting guzzled down. His gritty and hardcore style of writing is a guilty pleasure for me. I love this guy’s work with all my heart. RIP in peace HC
Umdwyn
As a huge Harry Crews fan, I was somewhat disappointed with "All We Need of Hell," which can easily be read in under four hours. Here, we are introduced to the main character, Duffy Deeter, a forty year old husband and father, who can best be described as an incredibly repulsive and self-centered human being. Everything about Duffy is about "bettering" himself, whether it be lifting more weight, running a faster mile, thrashing his opponent in handball or karate, or lasting longer sexually (by thinking of Hitler and concentration camps!).

Duffy is a cheating husband and absent father who basically has no regard for his wife and son, and spends most of his free time with his lover Marvella, a self-destructive cocaine addict, whom he seems to despise. Duffy forms an intense friendship with Jerome "Tump" Walker, after he intentionally kicks Tump in the head while playing handball. Tump, a cocaine addict, is a star pro football player, but seems to have a way to bring disparate people together, and improbably bonds with Duffy's son (and later, Duffy's lover, wife and mother). Running throughout the story is Duffy's dealings with his two-faced law partner, Jert MacPherson, who matches Duffy in repulsiveness.

Usually Crews offers the reader at least one character who tries to stand on higher ground. Perhaps Tump Walker is that person in this book. However, every character is addicted to one thing or another. By the end of the book, Duffy apparently trades his addiction of self-centeredness for whisky and vodka. Is the reader supposed to believe that this is an improvement? I just never accepted that any of the characters actually bettered themselves or really learned anything. Of course, the best Crews novels (e.g. "The Knockout Artist," "A Feast of Snakes," "Body," "The Scar Lover"), have many of the same elements. I just think these books are more compelling and provide a stronger and clearer moral message.
Groll
AMAZING! Hilarious and Insightful.
Jaiarton
No writer quite like Crews. This is one of his best. Outrageous yet sensitive to all. Beautiful writing. Good story.
Zugar
Great book, I am using Amazon to track down more Crews for my reading pleasure. My library doesn't have a single book of his, and that is a travesty. My first experience with him was A Feast of Snakes, which I think is still my favorite, but All We Need of Hell is right up there.
Akir
Having just reread All We Need of Hell, I am struck by what I think Harry Crews accomplishes better than any other contemporary - he creates real bodies. His characters are built on a particular fleshy foundation and in his prose, more than that of any other author, one senses the tension in the muscles, the rhythm of the heart, how it feels to pick something up and carry it, what physical 'balance' actually feels like and how deeply somatic are the emotional states routinely experienced by human beings. No matter how they try, most writers come at the physical self from the outside, through descriptions of what a body looks like or with descriptive abstractions of what one 'feels'. Crews starts with the fact of the body. What is it like when it is angry - what are its characteristics? His description and dialogue seem to be built out from this basis.
That being said, All We Need of Hell is one helluva physical book. Not only is he main character (like Crews himself) a lifelong amatuer athelete with a self destructive bent, but much of the action is purely physical and centers around running, handball, sex, fighting and some clearly 'slapstick' physical humour.
This is a rich and satisfying book. Short and bittersweet, it is perhaps more 'fun' than many of Crews's books. At least everyone doesn't die or get mutilated (much) as is typical of his earlier work. I found on rereading it, just as I had on my initial reading more than a decade ago, that the book is strangely optimistic and envigorating.
heart of sky
Of all the books and stories Harry Crews has written (and I've read) this is my absolute favourite. The tight and extremely economical prose contrasts beautifully with the weird world of Duffy Deeter and the outrageous, twisted events that make up this story. For ten years I've been waiting for Crews to outdo himself and although he hasn't really disappointed, he has never been as good as in this book. Granted, "Body" came in as a close second place favourite for all the same reasons I liked this one. But enough chitchat, go ahead and read "All we need of hell" yourselves if you can find it...
I read All We Need of Hell about 10 years ago. Borrowed the copy from my local library. I rarely re-read novels at all. I not only re-read it, but I checked it out again and read it a second time, immediately after the first time. Then, I tracked down a used trade-paperback in good condition and paid a significant sum of money for it. Read THAT copy. Shelved it and took it down and did a FOURTH reading. This has the most interesting mix of characters and a protagonist who lives for order and discipline, finds his life spinning out of control anyway. It's a great read which--and I hope this doesn't insult Harry--cries out to be filmed.
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