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eBook The Invasion of Canada, 1812-1813 epub

by Pierre Berton

eBook The Invasion of Canada, 1812-1813 epub
  • ISBN: 0140108556
  • Author: Pierre Berton
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (September 6, 1988)
  • Pages: 499 pages
  • ePUB size: 1140 kb
  • FB2 size 1833 kb
  • Formats azw lrf rtf doc


To America's leaders in 1812, an invasion of Canada seemed to be "a mere matter of marching," as Thomas Jefferson .

To America's leaders in 1812, an invasion of Canada seemed to be "a mere matter of marching," as Thomas Jefferson confidently predicted. How could a nation of 8 million fail to subdue a struggling colony of 300,000? Yet, when the campaign of 1812 ended, the only Americans left on Canadian soil were prisoners of war. Three American armies had been forced to surrender, and the British were in control of all of Michigan Territory and much of Indiana and Ohio

The Invasion of Canada: 1812-1813. But I still lacked details

The Invasion of Canada: 1812-1813. 0385658397 (ISBN13: 9780385658393). But I still lacked details.

Consequently, I plunged into this thick book and had a hard time putting it down.

Ships from and sold by jackintheboxbooks. Consequently, I plunged into this thick book and had a hard time putting it down. His foci are upon the incredible blundering top leadership (mostly American) and the suffering of the men and women caught in the war.

The Invasion of Canada: 1812–1813 is a 1980 book by Pierre Berton. This is, rather, a social history of the war, the first to be written by a Canadian. Details of the book were drawn from memoirs and diaries of common soldiers and commanding officers, as well as official military correspondence.

National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data. Berton, Pierre, 1920-. The invasion of Canada, 1812–1813. eISBN: 978-0-385-67360-0.

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To America's leaders in 1812, an invasion of Canada seemed to be a mere matter of marching, as Thomas . A wonderful book by Canada's foremost historian commemorates the War of 1812 as Canada's War of Independence

A wonderful book by Canada's foremost historian commemorates the War of 1812 as Canada's War of Independence. The War of 1812 was initiated by President Madison as a war of conquest against Ontario (or Lower Canada, as it was then known). The British forces were arrayed against various un-coordinated American attacks, and the Americans fared particularly badly in 1812-13, notably losing Detroit.

The invasion of Canada. by. An Atlantic Monthly Press book. Bibliography: v. 1, p. 343-354. United States - History - War of 1812 - Canada. Boston : Little, Brown.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. To America's leaders in 1812, an invasion of Canada seemed to be a mere matter of marching, as Thomas Jefferson confidently predicted

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. To America's leaders in 1812, an invasion of Canada seemed to be a mere matter of marching, as Thomas Jefferson confidently predicted. Three American armies had been forced to surrender, and the British were in control of all of Michigan Territory and much of Indiana and Ohio

LEWISTON, NEW YORK, August 15, 1812; with the United States Army of the Centre.

LEWISTON, NEW YORK, August 15, 1812; with the United States Army of the Centre eights above the Niagara River, flings himself onto his horse, and dashes off. The cries of his commanding officer, Major-General Stephen Van Rensselaer, echo behind him: Come back! Come back! But Lovett gallops on. Later, the General will tell him that he fully expected he was about to run away, never to be seen again; but this is mere badinage, for the two are old friends.

Recounts the only American invasion of Canada, during the War of 1812, which neither side won, and argues that Indian, Canadian, British, and American blood was shed for no positive purpose
Comments: (7)
Drelalen
Over the years, I have heard quite a lot of nationalistic bluster in regard to the events in this book. For that and other reasons, I have looked for some authoritative accounts. My impression here is that Pierre Berton had no axe to grind. The story is fair and engaging.

The author's take on combat is that leadership and discipline trump numbers, much to the disadvantage of the United States in 1812. It really was a different world. Imagine a militia in which officers were elected by the volunteers, commanders refused to recognize each other's authority, and a general had to negotiate with his own troops, even to the point of begging them to engage in battle.

The other side had problems of its own. Canadian loyalty is shown to have been somewhat fickle and partly dependent on their confidence in victory. We see how the British had to balance complicated and uncomfortable alliances with Indian tribes who had mixed motives. The Indians receive no free pass on the atrocities inflicted upon civilians and surrendered soldiers.

The characters are even more complex than the events, and they are presented with insight and occasional wit. I enjoyed the description of Brigadier-General William Wadsworth as "the most eloquently profane officer in the (US) army." A particularly sympathetic man is Major-General Stephen Van Rensselaer of the New York Militia. His position was a political appointment, but not one of his own making. It would have been easy enough to dismiss him as an unqualified political hack, but a compelling case is made to show him as a man who was placed at the Niagara River by opponents who wanted him out of the way. Duty kept him there in spite of it all.

I did note a few contradictions and implausible suggestions. How could there not be a few? On the whole, it holds up quite well. Gratefully absent from this narrative is the pop-history practice of trivializing people and events. No wooden teeth stories here. The war was deadly, the people were real, and Berton respected that.
funike
I wish that my history books back when I was a kid had been written like this wonderful book. It'd been easier to remember forever...
Global Progression
great
Fearlesshunter
Great read! Gives a good account of the military battles that helped Canada repel the invaders from the south! Of course they had British help and yes Indians fought on both sides, and unfortunately, may have been the losers of this war. After the war, the Indians had property seized and were killed.
Vital Beast
best history book i have read, even when i had to read it for class
adventure time
Excellent book. Can't wait to read the next book.
Ximinon
My speciality is World War II, but I collected Canadian postage stamps for 35 years, so I was intrigued by this forgotten aspect of US-Canadian history and relations. Most Americans have very little idea that the United States tried to invade Canada in 1813 and 1814, burned down Toronto, surrendered an American City (Detroit) and provided Canada with legends of national heroism that they remember to this day.

Consequently, I plunged into this thick book and had a hard time putting it down.

Pierre Berton was one of the foremost Canadian historians, and he conveyed the manifold aspects of the War of 1812 with incredible detail, power, and research. His foci are upon the incredible blundering top leadership (mostly American) and the suffering of the men and women caught in the war. There are some amazing characters in the book: Shadrach Byfield, a British soldier; Porter Hanks, an American officer who has to surrender Machilimackinac, even though he doesn't know the war has started; Tecumseh, who refuses to surrender; and Sir Isaac Brock, who orders: "Push On, Brave York Volunteers! " dying at the head of his troops. There are familiar figures like Oliver Hazard Perry, Henry Clay, and Zebulon Pike, meeting their well-documented destinies.

The war involved a great deal of pain, suffering, honor, double-dealing, heroism, cowardice, love of country, fear of outsiders, and fear of ideas. The Canadians feared American-style democracy, while the Americans were convinced that a little marching would make Canada's Provinces into additional states of the Union. All of these aspects -- including the ordeals of wounded men, prisoners, and civilians caught in the struggle.

The most powerful part of this book is how it is written in the present tense, which conveys immediacy -- turning a 200-year-old war into something that is swirling about the reader. The characters and battles are no longer sepia-toned images from two centuries ago, but living human beings struggling amid shot, shell, and bayonet, to determine the destiny of Canada. There is an immense, refined, taut, power to that writing, and I am using it in my own books on World War II -- telling that story in the present tense.

I cannot recommend this book too highly for serious students of Canadian history. It will hold you spellbound.
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