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eBook The Virgin of Bennington epub

by Kathleen Norris

eBook The Virgin of Bennington epub
  • ISBN: 157322913X
  • Author: Kathleen Norris
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Poetry
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books; Reprint edition (April 2, 2002)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1987 kb
  • FB2 size 1422 kb
  • Formats mobi txt lit rtf


After graduating from Bennington College in Vermont in 1969, Norris became arts administrator of the Academy of American Poets, and published her first book of poetry two years later. The Virgin of Bennington (2001). Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith (1998).

After graduating from Bennington College in Vermont in 1969, Norris became arts administrator of the Academy of American Poets, and published her first book of poetry two years later. In 1974 she inherited her grandparents' farm in Lemmon, South Dakota, moved there with her husband David Dwyer. Benedict and Scholastica.

The virgin of bennington. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. Kathleen Norris is the award-winning, bestselling author of Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith; The Cloister Walk; and Dakota: A Spiritual Geography. Poet and nonfiction author Norris (The Cloister Walk, 1996, et. focuses in this autobiography on her years at Bennington College in the mid-1960s and a subsequent period of maturation in New York. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, in various anthologies, and in her own three volumes of poetry. She divides her time between South Dakota and Hawaii.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). So her latest book comes as quite a contrast. The Virgin of Bennington is Norris's memoir of her college and twentysomething years in the late 60s and early 70s, before she rediscovered Christianity. Her title comes from her nickname as a naïve freshman at the Vermont liberal arts college. by. Norris, Kathleen, 1947-. The virgin of Bennington - Worlds - How to be a poet - Falling off - Salvation by poetry - Gravity - Taking wing - "Only connect" - Solicitude - Tonasket - Coda: "We should form a company. Norris's memoir is as much a coming of age story as it is about her move to Manhattan after college to work among the budding poetry scene in America, of which New York City was its national headquarters.

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The Virgin of Bennington is Kathleen being Kathleen. The Virgin of Bennington is Kathleen Norris's memoir of her time in New York City during college

The Virgin of Bennington is Kathleen being Kathleen. She was commissioned to write this book by its principal character, who she worked for and with upon graduation from Bennington College, and who, because of their After I read this book, I wrote to Kathleen immediately. I mentioned something like "I think its the best book you've written. Dakota, I said, was Kathleen trying be a writer. The Virgin of Bennington is Kathleen Norris's memoir of her time in New York City during college. I was thrilled to learn that our quiet town librarian had tasted the seedy life in the 1960's complete with sex, drugs, new and old friendships, and even a love affair with a college professor.

Kathleen Norris is the author of two books of poetry, Falling Off (1971) and The Middle of the World (1981) and has received awards from the Guggenheim and Bush foundations. She lives in Lemmon, South Dakota, with her husband. The Graywolf Annual Ten: Changing Community. If you're looking for a juicy read, this isn't it. If you're looking for more about the author Kathleen Norris, this will provide you with new information about her, but only about five percent of the material in the book covers her life at Bennington, and maybe 15 percent more covers her life in the '60s. The rest is an excellent biography about Betty Kray and her work at the Academy of American Poets.

After spending her high school years in Hawaii, Kathleen Norris was woefully unprepared for Bennington College in the 1960s, with its culture of drugs, sex, and bohemianism. But it was also at Bennington that she discovered her great love of poetry, which carried her to New York City at a time when a new generation of poets was emerging and shaking up the establishment.

In these excerpts from Norris's book, she describes Betty Kray, the first . The two women indelibly changed the landscape for poetry in America. Reprinted from The Virgin of Bennington (Riverhead Books, 2001) by Kathleen Norris. Used by permission of Penguin Publishing Corporation.

In these excerpts from Norris's book, she describes Betty Kray, the first executive director of the Academy of American Poets, and Kray's relentless efforts to promote American poetry. Betty hoped that the position would afford her considerable autonomy, but she was apprehensive.

125,000 first printing. About the Author: Kathleen Norris is the award-winning, bestselling author of Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith; The Cloister Walk; and Dakota: A Spiritual Geography.

Shy and sheltered as a young woman, Kathleen Norris wasn't prepared for the sex, drugs, and bohemianism of Bennington College in the late 1960s—and when she moved to New York City after graduation, it was a case of out of the frying pan and into the fire. In this chronicle, Norris remembers the education she received, both formal and fortuitous; the influence of her mentor Betty Kray, who shunned the spotlight while serving as a guiding force in the poetry world of the late 20th century; her encounters with such figures as James Merrill, Jim Carroll, Denise Levertov, Stanley Kunitz, Patti Smith, and Erica Jong; and her eventual decision to leave Manhattan for the less-crowded landscape she described so memorably in Dakota. This account of the making of a young writer will resonate with anyone who has stumbled bravely into a bigger world and found the poetry that lurks on rooftops and in railroad apartments—and with anyone who has enjoyed the blessings of inspiring teachers and great friends.
Comments: (7)
Yozshubei
This was a tedious book to read. I became interested in Kathleen Norris after reading The Cloister Walk and Amazing Grace. I was interested to read about what triggered her religious conversion. I'd been warned that there was more information about poetry and her mentor Betty Kray than there was about her past transgressions and resulting conversion. But I decided to tackle it anyway since I always find some nuggets in her books.

There just wasn't enough of her personal life to make this a fascinating story. I have just about no interest in the evolution of poetry and poetry readings. I think that poetry can be helpful for certain people. I'm not a poet and not usually a lover of poetry, but I have received some nuggets from various poems that I have read. I would have been interested to hear more about what type of poetry interests Norris or to hear about what type of poetry she enjoys writing with maybe a sample or two.

As far as the "sins of her youth," she really glosses over her past. It just can't be described as a compelling book. As far as Betty Kray, she sounds like an upstanding citizen and caring person, but I didn't find her as fascinating as Norris did. For me, the book was slow-moving and dry. I wish that I could have found the nuggets others seem to have found. I think that the title is quite misleading. It's a titillating title, but she promises more than she delivers.
just one girl
I'm a compulsive reader of stories by Bennington authors. This one was fun.
Beranyle
I'm a huge fan of Norris and especially love Dakota and The Cloister Walk. I found this book to be boring and I was disappointed in Norris herself much to my own personal dismay. I agree with one viewer's comment that she found her voice in South Dakota.
greatest
I like Kathleen Norris books and have just about all of them. This one is not one of my favorites, however--it didn't seem to have her usual spiritual insights.
Grarana
This book contains the memoirs of the formative years of Kathleen Norris. Norris attended high school in Hawaii, where her father, a professional musician, was stationed with the Navy orchestra. When it came time to start her undergraduate studies, Norris found herself at Bennington College in Vermont, completely unprepared for the sexually permissive culture of the East Coast in the 1960s. During part of her senior year at Bennington, she worked as an intern at the Academy of American Poets in New York City. Following her graduation, she took a full-time position at the Academy, assisting with all manner of office chores, from fetching the mail to escorting poets to their readings for the Academy around the City. This book relates Norris' adventures during those years, when she was finding herself both as an adult and as a poet. The book is also a record of Norris' relationship with her mentor, Betty Kray, executive director of the Academy.

Far from the titillating blurb on the cover, which mentions Norris' acquaintances in New York, such as Jim Carroll or Erica Jong, the book is focused more on Betty Kray and her tireless campaign to bring poetry into the mainstream through her work at the Academy. Indeed, some of the anecdotes of the people Norris met during her time in Manhattan almost come across as name-dropping. In some places, the text drags a little as Norris breaks off the main narrative to give details about seemingly unrelated events from different time periods. Nevertheless, the story provides a slow-paced tale of Norris' early years as a poet, which may help fans of her other books better understand some of the events that continue to influence her today. The book is also a beautiful memorial to the remarkable work of Betty Kray.
Inerrace
Poet Kathleen Norris is most known for her reflective meditations on the Christian life in her books Dakota: A Spiritual Geography, The Cloister Walk and Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith. So her latest book comes as quite a contrast. The Virgin of Bennington is Norris's memoir of her college and twentysomething years in the late 60s and early 70s, before she rediscovered Christianity.
Her title comes from her nickname as a naïve freshman at the Vermont liberal arts college. She moves quickly through her college years and spends most of the book recounting her experiences in New York as an assistant with the Academy of American Poets. This follows the familiar path of college, moving to the big city and getting the first job, but in Norris's able hands, the narrative is not only her own coming-of-age story but our universal story of encountering "real life" for the first time.
Norris was spiritually uncommitted during these years, and she is candid about her casual sex life and the drug use typical of the era, though never explicit or titillating. Others may cover similar ground in a therapeutic tell-all fashion, but Norris chronicles her past with deep poetic and literary sophistication.
While Norris's other books explore the spiritual life she now has, this book in contrast explores who she once was. Christians are sometimes conflicted about their pre-Christian life, falling into the errors of either overglorifying or denying a sinful past. Norris walks between these pitfalls and points to an appropriate role of memory and the importance of one's personal history.
Part of Norris's work at the Academy was to help New Yorkers understand their literary heritage, recapturing Walt Whitman's 1840's Manhattan or Langston Hughes's Harlem of 1926. This book is a similar recovery of the past, as she gives today's readers a compelling portrait of New York in the 1960s and 70s. This makes me wonder - thirty years from now, what will we remember of the 1990s or early 2000s? Things we now find mundane may hold great meaning to us later. Norris helps us realize that all times and places are filled with promise for those with eyes to see.
While the book starts out being about herself, much of it ends up being about Betty Kray, the executive director of the Academy. This gradual shift from autobiography to biography is an affectionate tribute to the influence of her mentor. It serves as a subtle reminder that young adults need older voices to help them find their way in this formative phase of life.
Norris also models the possibility of poetry as a Christian calling. She sees no conflict between the two worlds and is as conversant with 20th-century poets as with 4th-century saints. We would do well to follow her example and explore the riches of the arts and humanities, whether the work is particularly Christian or not.
Why should Christians be interested in this book? While she doesn't put things quite this way, her memoir follows the classic structure of fall and redemption. She begins in innocence, but soon slides into several affairs and a time of lostness and despair.
But grace is at work, even through a Manhattan literary scene ambivalent toward God. During a time of poetic dryness, her mentor encouraged her to take a literature class on 18th-century novels. There she rediscovered John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, which forced her to crack open a Bible.
"Although I would have rejected this notion at the time," Norris writes, "I now believe that God was there all along, present even in seeming absent." This memoir gives us hope that many of our peers, though they may now seem completely unaware of God, may yet be drawn toward him in unexpected ways.
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