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eBook Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan epub

by Paul Celan

eBook Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan epub
  • ISBN: 0393322246
  • Author: Paul Celan
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Poetry
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (December 17, 2001)
  • Pages: 464 pages
  • ePUB size: 1263 kb
  • FB2 size 1532 kb
  • Formats mbr lrf lit docx


Paul Celan was born in 1920 in the East European province of Bukovina. Soon after his parents. Selected Poems and Prose. has been added to your Cart.

Paul Celan was born in 1920 in the East European province of Bukovina.

Paul Celan was born Paul Antschel in Czernovitz, Romania, to a German-speaking Jewish family. Norton & C. 2000. Glottal Stop: 101 Poems, translated by Nikolai B. Popov and Heather McHugh, Wesleyan University Press, 2000. Breathturn, translated by Pierre Joris, Green Integer, 1995. Last Poems, translated by Katharine Washburn and Margret Guillemin, North Point Press, 1986.

Browse through Paul Celan's poems and quotes. 39 poems of Paul Celan. Paul Celan (23 November 1920 - 20 April 1970, (Cernăuţi, Bukovin) Chernivtsi, Ukraine).

Start by marking Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan as Want to. .Strangely, Paul Celan renounced Fugue of Death in his later years for being ‘too direct’ and hindered its republication, without success.

Start by marking Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For this reason it becomes very difficult to interpret his later work with any degree of certainty.

Paul Celan, John Felstiner. Paul Celan was born in 1920 in the East European province of Bukovina

Paul Celan, John Felstiner. Paul Celan was born in 1920 in the East European province of Bukovina. Soon after his parents, German-speaking Jews, had perished at the hands of the Nazis, Celan wrote "Todesfuge" ("Deathfugue"), the most compelling poem to emerge from the Holocaust. Self-exiled in Paris, for twenty-five years Celan continued writing in his German mother tongue, although it had "passed through the thousand darknesses of deathbringing speech. This landmark volume includes youthful lyrics, unpublished poems, and prose. All poems appear in the original and in translation on facing pages. Soon after his parents, German-speaking Jews, had perished at the hands of the Nazis, Celan wrote Todesfuge ( Deathfugue ), the most compelling poem to emerge from the Holocaust. Self-exiled in Paris, for twenty-five years Celan continued writing in his German mother tongue, although it had passed through the thousand darknesses of deathbringing speech. John Felstiner’s translations stem from a twenty-year immersion in Celan’s life and work.

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He was born as Paul Antschel to a Jewish family in Cernăuți (German: Czernowitz), in the then Kingdom of Romania.

He was born as Paul Antschel to a Jewish family in Cernăuți (German: Czernowitz), in the then Kingdom of Romania (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine), and adopted the pseudonym "Paul Celan".

Автор: Celan, Paul Название: Selected poems and prose of paul celan Издательство: Wiley Классификация .

The most wide-ranging volume of the work of Europe's leading postwar poet, including previously unpublished writings.

Paul Celan was born in 1920 in the East European province of Bukovina. Soon after his parents, German-speaking Jews, had perished at the hands of the Nazis, Celan wrote "Todesfuge" ("Deathfugue"), the most compelling poem to emerge from the Holocaust. Self-exiled in Paris, for twenty-five years Celan continued writing in his German mother tongue, although it had "passed through the thousand darknesses of deathbringing speech." His writing purges and remakes that language, often achieving a hope-struck radiance never before seen in modern poetry. But in 1970, his psychic wounds unhealed, Celan drowned himself in the Seine. This landmark volume includes youthful lyrics, unpublished poems, and prose. All poems appear in the original and in translation on facing pages. John Felstiner's translations stem from a twenty-year immersion in Celan's life and work. John Bayley wrote in the New York Review of Books, "Felstiner translates ... brilliantly."
Comments: (7)
hardy
A complex writer, with deep vision of the Shoah, very painful, as the inhumanity and violence of the Holocaust are unspeakable, so finding words is beyond difficult. Much of his later work slides into abstraction, imagery, non discursive, where the surface of words and how they echo on the reader is all there is. I had questions about some of the translation, though it is celebrated, and even bought a German dictionary and found a few translations that took some liberties with the original, though close in spirit.
Rare
all good
Kaghma
I don't pretend to understand Celan intellectually. I don't know if a lifetime's worth of study and analysis can ultimately decipher what is innately indecipherable, but I suppose you can, in a way, make the same claim for the poetry of Dickinson and Crane..complex and powerful poetry with perhaps all too obvious driving forces, but with roots that tap into depths both private, and mysterious. But while my mind can't always make sense of language and verse so richly allusive, metaphoric, neologistic, and symbolic, my heart understands every jot and tittle. To me, Celan's poetry is simultaneously an anguished cry and triumphant shout from the ashes of the Holocaust. Using the favored language of his parents, the language of the poetry of Heine and Rilke that he and his beloved mother loved, the native language of her murderers, he twists, transmutes and ultimately transfigures it into a sublime artifice that allows him to go on living in the face of an unthinkable past, a cruel and hypocritical present, and an uncertain future that would tragically end under the waters of the Seine in 1970. Paul Celan thus becomes the greatest post WW2 poet of the German language. In his Bremen speech Celan wrote:

It, the language, remained, not lost, yes in spite of everything. But it had to pass through it's own answerlessness, pass through frightful muting, pass through the thousand darknesses of deathbringing speech. It passed through and gave back no words for that which happened; yet it passed through this happening. Passed through and could come to light again, "enriched" by all this. In this language I have sought, during those years and the years since then, to write poems: so as to speak, to orient myself, to find out where I was and where I was meant to go, to sketch out reality for myself.

The above mentioned difficulty with Celan is compounded by the fact that for the individual who cannot read German, much can be lost in translation. There is a distinctly different rhythm to German verse, and many German words have multiple meanings, some explicit and others oblique, which force translators into critical decisions in the selection process. I have read both Felstiner's and Joris's translations of Celan, and prefer the less literal method of Felstiner. A further bonus in this volume is having the original German text adjacent to the translations.
Frlas
Paul Celan is now considered one of the great postwar poets, perhaps the greatest poet to come out of the Holocaust, and the 2nd most influential German poet after Rilke. His most famous poem, "Todesfuge" (Deathfugue) is considered the most important poem on the Holocaust.
But beyond all that hyperbolic praise lies a poet who defies easy description, whose poetry is both demanding, difficult, beautiful and lyrical, and who deserves to be read by a wider audience.
Felstiner provides us with one of the 2 best bilingual editions of Celan's most important work (the other is by Michael Hamburger), and supplements it with a very well written introduction and translations of Celan's most important prose writings, including the Buchner speech "The Meridian". These prose pieces will be essential for students of Celan, and cast an important light on the poems.
The translations of the poems themselves are quite good, and at times brilliant, such as the innovative way that Felstiner translates "Deathfugue," subtly interweaving the original German more and more in the repetitions of the chorus until the poem ends with two lines entirely in German. The effect is chilling. Felstiner deserves the translation award he won for this book solely on the basis of this one poem, which shocked me anew when I read it in his English translation.
If you are unfamiliar with Celan up to now, this is a good place to start. If you are already an admirer of Celan's poems, this will be a welcome addition to your library. See also Felstiner's biography on Celan, "Paul Celan: Poet, Survivor, Jew".
Gtonydne
An excellent translation of one of the great voices of modern poetry. Celan, perhaps more than any other poet, bore witness to the destruction of humanity by the Nazi German regime. His poems sear through the heart like no other. One of he greatest works, "Deathfugue" or "Todesfuge" which resonates through the past throughout time:

"Black milk of daybreak we drink it at evening

we drink it at midday and morning we drink it at night

we drink and we drink

we shovel a grave in the air where you won't lie too cramped

A man lives in the house he plays with his vipers he writes

he writes when it grows dark in Deutschland your golden hair

Margareta..."
FireWater
I am not an expert reading of Celan. I do not know most of his poetry. I would not even know if I would assent to the claims made for its greatness, were they not made by such distinguished students of poetry.

I was once present at an evening in which 'Todesfugue ' was read translated and interpreted by the German- Hebrew translator Shimon Sandbank, and also interpreted by the critic of German Literature Siegfried Moses.

What struck me at the reading was the haunting horror rhythmically driven, the maddeningness and hypnotic quality of the poetry.

I also knew a woman in Jerusalem who knew Celan personally, had written a thesis on his poetry, and was absolutely devoted to his poetry which she believed to be beyond any other.

This large comprehensive work gives the reader an opportunity to contend with the greatest part of Celan's life-work.
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