» » The Holiday Season

eBook The Holiday Season epub

by Michael Knight

eBook The Holiday Season epub
  • ISBN: 080214389X
  • Author: Michael Knight
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grove Press; Reprint edition (November 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • ePUB size: 1857 kb
  • FB2 size 1785 kb
  • Formats azw mbr rtf doc


Michael Knight's The Holiday Season joins this crowded table and. makes itself at home. After having read The Divining Rod and various short stories by Michael Knight, I was excited to stumble upon this novel.

Michael Knight's The Holiday Season joins this crowded table and.

Any members of educational institutions wishing to photocopy part or all of the work for classroom use, or publishers who would like to obtain permission to include the work in an anthology, should send their inquiries to Grove/Atlantic,.

Электронная книга "The Holiday Season", Michael Knight. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Holiday Season" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Holiday Season book. Knight has the rare power to make a setting breathe. Michael Knight has the uncanny ability to sort through the emotional lives of everyday people, disappointments, surprises, the small chuckles, how adults feel about their children of all ages, and so on. The dialogue, the conversation, the interior feelings, are all so real. There are no tortured graduate students or frustrated novelists in this world, this is real writing about real lives.

The Holiday Season - Michael Knight.

His new book, The Holiday Season, comprises two novellas that deepen his concern with the fraught dynamics of. .Michael Knight’s Holiday Season joins this crowded table and, especially in its title piece, makes itself at home.

His new book, The Holiday Season, comprises two novellas that deepen his concern with the fraught dynamics of intimate life. The title novella takes place during the first Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays of the new millennium, as the Posey family of Mobile attempts to celebrate. The younger son, Frank, a sometime actor in his early 30s, finds himself playing the role of family middleman, hoping to bring his older brother, Ted, and their widowed father together.

The Holiday Season joins this crowded table and. Hilarious and heartbreaking, The Holiday Season and its companion piece, Love at the End of the Year, are tender ruminations on the nature of family, the power of love, and a particularly complicated time of year. In The Holiday Season, father Jeff Posey and sons Ted and Frank are still trying to figure out how to be a family three years after the death of the wife and mother who bound them together.

Simultaneously hilarious and heartbreaking, The Holiday Season and its companion piece, Love at the End of the Year are tender ruminations on the nature of family, the power of love, and a particularly complicated time of year. In The Holiday Season, Jeff, Ted, and Frank Posey are still trying to figure out how to be a family three years after the death of the wife and mother who bound them together.

Simultaneously hilarious and heartbreaking, The Holiday Season and its companion piece, Love at the End of the Year are tender ruminations on the nature of family, the power of love, and a particularly complicated time of year.  In The Holiday Season, Jeff, Ted, and Frank Posey are still trying to figure out how to be a family three years after the death of the wife and mother who bound them together. As the year winds to a close and the holidays threaten to unearth the usual myriad of emotions and memories, hairline fractures in the Poseys’ relationships finally splinter and crack over what should be, but never are, simple dilemmas: where to spend the holidays and when it is finally time to break with old traditions. The second novella, Love at the End of the Year, is an intoxicating tale that weighs up love in all its many forms over the course of a single, magical Alabama New Year’s Eve.
Comments: (7)
Sorryyy
After having read The Divining Rod and various short stories by Michael Knight, I was excited to stumble upon this novel. Simply put, I'm a fan. His use of language is beautiful, flowing, and faultless. He has an understated voice, southern and strong, and he takes his readers along a journey we can all understand even if the setting or plot is different than any we've experienced in our own lives. The characters are sound, the humor subtle, and the enjoyment complete.
Ishnsius
Knight has a way of spinning words to capture the intimacy of the holidays and all the hoo-haw we make of them in a delightfully honest and heartfelt way. Knight is just good, damn good, and is worth your time.
Conjuril
Arrived quickly!
Dagdardana
The cover of THE HOLIDAY SEASON raises all sorts of alarms: a tired, clichéd work about family dysfunction by a narrator full of oh-so-deep regrets and insights. The photo of a silhouette staring off into the starry night on a snow-covered plain reeks of Hallmark sweetness. And while the book is mostly what one expects from a holiday story with a Sedaris-humor bent, it is at the top of its class. This slim gem is best read in front of the fire during the winter.

The title novella is a portrait of the Posey family: the good soul, now self-neglecting and recent widower Jeff; his son, the tired actor and poetic narrator Frank; and the annoyingly successful brother Ted, who has a beautiful wife and daughters. With the boys' mother recently dead, Ted has decided to "start some family traditions of his own," and Jeff refuses to leave his littered house. Frank spends Thanksgiving with Jeff and Christmas with Ted, and we see the dynamics of three men who prefer not to speak of the problems surrounding them, each possessing their own form of pride. Jeff drinks too heavily and refuses to let anyone into his life, even though part of him needs to replace the hole left by his wife's death. Frank seems unable to grasp a foothold in life: he works in a traveling theater company that abridges plays for school assemblies and lives an uninspired day-to-day life, regretting how little impact Shakespeare's words have on him. Despite all this, he doesn't seem all that enthused to start living his life. Ted is unsympathetic to his father's quirks and fails to see viewpoints other than his own, giving him a jerky quality.

As is crucial for such a character-driven work (there is little plot to speak of), none of them are overly simplistic and they never lapse into more clichéd versions of themselves. There is truth in what each of them believes and how each of them lives, judgment comes with difficulty, and more importantly, one feels no need to do so. These are real people with real problems; our privilege to see them at a particularly vulnerable point of their lives does not lend credence to any harsh moralizing. The lack of resolution doesn't feel disappointing, surprisingly, a credit to Knight's deftness. When discussing why he didn't make the novella a play, Frank writes, "I had no third act, that our story had no clear-cut resolution and likely never would, that whatever we had gained...something was lost as well, some opportunity missed, perhaps, though the nature of that something is hazy to me even now."

The other piece, "Love at the End of the Year," is a collage of people's points of view at a New Year's party. This work is substantially funnier than "The Holiday Season," mixing in more humor with the soulful personalities of the characters and their relationships --- for example, the continued attempts of a wife to tell her husband she's leaving him, though he repeatedly doesn't get it upon hearing so. But because each point-of-view narrative is only a few pages at a time, the work is less full. With more characters to develop and less space to do so, this story, while by no means bad, also does not live up to the standards of "The Holiday Season." To its credit, it does retain the no-resolution finish, which again leaves the reader with a conflicted ball of emotions to deal with but not unmanageably so.

So what sticks with us after we leave these people behind? The dialogue and descriptions are full of subtle realism. Knight doesn't just show (as opposed to tell). He paints. These short works are packed with details, which alone provide enough motivation to slow down and inhale the text rather than moving along at a brisker pace, a natural inclination given the simplicity of the prose. Also worth noting is the pitch-perfect humor. When a 13-year-old girl runs away and leaves her mother a note, it says, "She could make her own decisions. Exclamation point. She didn't need a mother. Exclamation point. She could look after herself. Double exclamation point. Sincerely, Lulu."

Knight has a mastery of graceful and rhythmic prose, which he employs elegantly to make his humor stick. Capturing a world in a phrase, he creates wonderful narratives of troubled men and women, people we can empathize with during the heart of winter.

--- Reviewed by Max Falkowitz
Flamehammer
A good, worthwhile read at anytime of the year, but best saved, savored and enjoyed during the holiday season, from mid-November through Christmas when we tend to think about relationships, good and bad.

Two stories about people living the joys, heartaches and difficulties of human relationships. The book has something for all generations. The first story is about father-son relationships during the holidays, a story of loss, regret, hope, and love. The second is about young people, still finding their way.

Not a deep read, but a good read, especially late at night in front of a blazing fire
Mr.Savik
Great book. The author has an ear for real dialogue between family members, both functional and disfunctional. Really enjoyed 'Love at the end of the Season' (second story in the book) but both stories are great reads. Anyone can relate to the trials, tribulations and foibles of these families and their need to connect while struggling to maintain a personal identity.
Jelar
Evey time I read something by Michael Knight, I'm left wondering why he isn't more famous than he is. For me, his stories are as good as they get. They are fun and entertaining, literary and sad. Of the two novellas found in The Holiday Season, I particularly enjoyed "Love at the End of the Year." It juggles some ten or more characters and covers everything from Internet Porn to Guns and Romance--all good stuff within the context of a Michael Knight story.
Michael Knight's writing, like William Trevor's, always seems so natural as to be effortless - which tells you just how skillful a writer he is. His stories flow through you, yet stay with you long after you've regretfully finished the book. The settings are Southern yet cast so that they feel like home wherever you're from.
eBooks Related to The Holiday Season
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020