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eBook The Ends of Our Tethers: Thirteen Sorry Stories epub

by Alasdair Gray

eBook The Ends of Our Tethers: Thirteen Sorry Stories epub
  • ISBN: 1841955477
  • Author: Alasdair Gray
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Canongate U.S. (March 25, 2004)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • ePUB size: 1477 kb
  • FB2 size 1478 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf mobi mbr


Since 1981, when Alasdair Gray's first novel Lanark was published by. .You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to The Ends Of Our Tethers: Thirteen Sorry Stories. eTextbook Return Policy.

Since 1981, when Alasdair Gray's first novel Lanark was published by Canongate, his characters have aged as fast as their author. The Ends of Our Tethers shows the high jinks of many folk in the last stages of physical, moral and social decrepitude - a sure tonic for the young. In 'Job's Skin Game' a father develops a skin condition in response to the emotional shock of losing his two sons in the September 11th attacks and his fortune in the dot-com crisis.

The Ends Of Our Tethers: Thirteen Sorry Stories

Published by Canongate Books Ltd. 30 July 2004. The Ends Of Our Tethers: Thirteen Sorry Stories. The Ends of Our Tethers shows the high jinks of many folk in the last stages of physical, moral and social decrepitude – a sure tonic for the young. The first work of fiction in over six years by one of Britain’s most original and brilliant writers, this wonderful (and very funny) new collection reaffirms Gray’s position as a master of the short story. The Ends of Our Tethers is vintage Gray – experimental, mischievous, wide-ranging but also subtly connected.

In "Ends of our Tethers" Alasdair Gray achieves a beautiful harmony between postmodern mashup of style and . The narrators of these stories are filled with an existential kind of despair. I can't recommend this book enough

In "Ends of our Tethers" Alasdair Gray achieves a beautiful harmony between postmodern mashup of style and deep, true characters. Sinkings" and "No Bluebeard" are stories that are presented almost as lists. The first being three brief scenarios where the narrator was emotionally damaged and insulted by the people around him, the second is a male narrator recounting the tale of his various ruined marriages, the wives referred to simply as FIRST, SECOND, and THIRD. I can't recommend this book enough. Sometimes visionary sometimes just interesting and enjoyable.

I began by smiling wryly at the mordant wit but by story thirteen I was swimming in gloom. Don’t be put off, these are excellently written stories but don’t read them when you are feeling depressed or life won’t be worth living. Find similar books Profile. Success is overrated. The best proof of our worth is how we respond to failure

Since 1981, when Alasdair Gray's first novel Lanark was published by Canongate, his . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Ends of the Earth.

Since 1981, when Alasdair Gray's first vel Lanark was published by Cangate, his characters have aged as fast as their author. The first work of fiction in over six years by one of Britain's most original and brilliant writers, this wonderful (and very funny) new collection reaffirms Gray's position as a master of the short story. The first work of fiction in over six years by one of Britain's most original and brilliant writers, this wonderful (and very funny) new collection reaffirms Gray's position as a master of the short story

Fans of the work of Donald Barthelme, Kurt Vonnegut, George Saunders, and T. Coraghessan Boyle will revel in Alasdair Gray's masterful, witty collection

Fans of the work of Donald Barthelme, Kurt Vonnegut, George Saunders, and T. Coraghessan Boyle will revel in Alasdair Gray's masterful, witty collection. Gray's stories defy genre, and his angular, playful style, prodigious wit, and razor-sharp intellect are matched by his remarkable skill with the short-story form. In "Job's Skin Game," the narrator humbly tells his life story like the evenings news.

A collection of short stories by the author of Unlikely Stories, Mostly and 1982 returns with his first collection in seven years, offering a series of funny, magical tales of modern life.
Comments: (4)
Ventelone
I'm halfway through The Ends of Our Tethers and am trying to stop reading so fast. Please keep this book in stock! The stories are brilliant with hilarious endings. My favorite story so far is "Moral Philosophy Exam" which is very funny and ends with a multiple choice exam. "No Bluebeard" is the most memorable, a story about a man's four failing marriages. I can't describe in words how much I'm enjoying this book. "Job's Skin Game" had me both cringing and laughing uncontrollably. Perfect!
Global Progression
I love Alasdar Grey
Friert
I was introduced to this work by Madison Smartt Bell when he read "15 February 2003" to a creative writing class a few years ago. I was very intrigued and bought the book shortly after. The short stories in this book are both visionary and hilarious. Gray has a beautiful ability to capture a deep sense of truth from minor details and quietly bizarre circumstances. He gets into some very deep psychological territory with stories such as "Aiblins," where the author himself meets a fictionalized version of himself as a young man, and "Job's Skin Game" where a man who is coping with eczema engages in quaint and grotesque skin peeling rituals. His stories are immediately engaging, very fun and easy to read though often presented in esoteric forms.

I read Poor Things a year or so after this book and liked it FAR less. That book, although a good yarn, seemed trite next to this book. It seemed a bit gimmicky; the tricks that Gray uses throughout that book were fun but didn't leave a lasting impression.
In "Ends of our Tethers" Alasdair Gray achieves a beautiful harmony between postmodern mashup of style and deep, true characters. "Sinkings" and "No Bluebeard" are stories that are presented almost as lists. The first being three brief scenarios where the narrator was emotionally damaged and insulted by the people around him, the second is a male narrator recounting the tale of his various ruined marriages, the wives referred to simply as FIRST, SECOND, and THIRD.

My favorite of these stories are those that add a touch of the surreal. "Big Pockets with Buttoned Flaps" and "15 February 2003" seem to take place in a future dystopia. The narrators of these stories are filled with an existential kind of despair.
I can't recommend this book enough. Sometimes visionary sometimes just interesting and enjoyable. Gray's illustrations also add to the experience of this book. The leering skulls seem both friendly and evil.
Kale
This is an excellent, hilarious and often disturbing collection of short stories. My one criticism is that the penultimate story, an account of a protest against the Iraq war, is so tonally different from the other pieces that it rings false. The other stories have an almost Beckett-like abstraction and eternal quality, the penultimate story has already dated.
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