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eBook Games of the Blind epub

by Evelin Sullivan

eBook Games of the Blind epub
  • ISBN: 0880641584
  • Author: Evelin Sullivan
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: United States
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Fromm Intl (May 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 297 pages
  • ePUB size: 1946 kb
  • FB2 size 1756 kb
  • Formats doc mobi lrf rtf


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NY: Fromm International Publishing Corporation,. 8v. cloth & boards in dust jacket. Signed presentation from Sullivan on half-title page: "Dear Alexander, At last we meet! Best, Evelin. Also signed again by Sullivan on the title page. Bookseller Inventory 25484. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: GAMES OF THE BLIND. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

Each is luridly detailed and analyzed from all possible angles. Very little happens, plotwise; this book does not read like the bare-bones outline for a movie.

Paul Avery has committed a murder, and he painstakingly re- creates the tormented life that led up to his deed. Each is luridly detailed and analyzed from all possible angles. It's immensely literate and thoughtful, wonderful yet painful to read, trapping us as it does in a mind determined to leave no stone unturned-and each stone, overturned, reveals a swarm of psychologically slimy things.

Games of the blind Evelin Sullivan. Download PDF book format. Games of the blind Evelin Sullivan. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Book's title: Games of the blind Evelin Sullivan. Library of Congress Control Number: 93046670.

This is a book about psychological depths, and Evelin Sullivan understands - and writes about - these depths astonishingly, even frighteningly, well

This is a book about psychological depths, and Evelin Sullivan understands - and writes about - these depths astonishingly, even frighteningly, well. Games of the Blind" is a brilliant novel narrated by a truly vicious man - a twisted monster of a man, to be sure, but it is Sullivan's weird triumph that she renders the narrator. so true-to-life, so heartbreakingly human that we find ourselves sympathizing with him even as he commits the vilest of acts.

The concise book of lying. These are some of the questions novelist and Stanford writing professor Sullivan (Games of the Blind. Why do people lie? What do people lie about? And what kinds of lies are considered unpardonable? These are some of the questions novelist and Stanford writing professor Sullivan (Games of the Blind. Evelyn Sullivan is the author of four novels, including "The Dead Magician" & "The Correspondence". Born & raised in Munich, she lives in Redwood City, California & teaches technical writing at Stanford University. Bibliographic information.

This is a book about psychological depths, and Evelin Sullivan understands - and writes about - these depths astonishingly .

This is a book about psychological depths, and Evelin Sullivan understands - and writes about - these depths astonishingly, even frighteningly, well. Games of the Blind" is a brilliant novel narrated by a truly vicious man - a twisted monster of a man, to be sure, but it is Sullivan's weird triumph that she renders the narrator so true-to-life, so heartbreakingly human that we find ourselves sympathizing with him even as he commits the vilest of acts.

Rachel struggled through the doorway, her arms filled with grocery bags, purse, and a tote bag filled with the office mail.

Rachel struggled through the doorway, her arms filled with grocery bags, purse, and a tote bag filled with the office mail icked the door closed behind her. In here. I could use some help, she called, leaning against the door while she tried to shrug off her coat without putting down the cumbersome bags. With a heavy sigh, she moved through the living room and stopped in the kitchen to stow the milk and yogurt in the refrigerator. The rest she left on the counter. Hope you got some food

These are some of the questions novelist and Stanford writing professor Sullivan (Games of the Blind) addresses in this comprehensive study of deception.

Despite her fascination with lies, Sullivan is essentially an old-fashioned moralist who thinks that lying is, by and large, "an evil thing," while accepting that "deception is here to stay. These are some of the questions novelist and Stanford writing professor Sullivan (Games of the Blind) addresses in this comprehensive study of deception. By analyzing biblical texts and Greek mythology, she shows how the cultural evaluation of deception changed with the spiritual and intellectual climate of the times.

The book opens with a cross-cultural survey of the important-and ambiguous-role lying plays in a wealth . Touching on philosophy, literature, history, and psychology, The Concise Book of Lying is an erudite tour of the twilit realm of trickery.

The book opens with a cross-cultural survey of the important-and ambiguous-role lying plays in a wealth of early texts and stories, from the Bible to myths about those most inventive liars, tricksters.

The narrator, a psychologist who fell in love with one of his patients, describes the events that led him to commit murder
Comments: (3)
Zacki
If you're like me, and you're a man, you may read this book and wonder, "How could a woman writer understand a man so well -- understand the raw, ugly, visceral feeling of being a man -- understand the wretched, petty things men do and feel?" This is a book about psychological depths, and Evelin Sullivan understands -- and writes about -- these depths astonishingly, even frighteningly, well.
"Games of the Blind" is a brilliant novel narrated by a truly vicious man -- a twisted monster of a man, to be sure, but it is Sullivan's weird triumph that she renders the narrator so true-to-life, so heartbreakingly human that we find ourselves sympathizing with him even as he commits the vilest of acts. It's been a while since I've read "Games of the Blind," but roughly the plot is this: When the story begins, the narrator is a sensitive, intellectual young man who falls in love with an older woman while he is on vacation with his parents. This is a formative experience, the force of which shapes the rest of his life. For some reason (do his parents die?) he is sent to live with an aunt and uncle and their fat, self-loathing daughter. He preys upon his cousin mercilessly -- sexually and emotionally -- and this is rendered even more repellent because she adores him so.
We follow the narrator into adulthood, when he becomes a psychologist and becomes entranced by a female patient who stirs memories of that haunting affair he had as a teenager. This relationship leads to the book's satisfyingly shocking climax. The theory and practice of psychology are central to the book -- the narrator even includes several "theoretical interludes" in which he attempts to analyze himself and the events that overtook him. In a sense, the book becomes a profound meditation on the alienation of gifted teenagers; on the life-shattering powers of love, lust, and infatuation; on the diverse forces that blindside us, shape us, destroy us; and how "free will" can even become an empty concept if you understand the torrents of rage, sorrow, and longing that surge underneath the facade of the "self" that most of us present to others. So in addition to a story that you won't be able to put down, the book is deeply philosophical as well.
I think the best thing I can say about this novel is that, of all the books I have read for pleasure and for "work" (I used to review fiction and poetry for two publications), it shook me up more than any book ever has. I was genuinely depressed for a week after reading it -- I felt I had glimpsed absolute evil in the character of the narrator, and this glimpse sent me reeling. To my way of thinking, in this age of literary fads, slick packaging and stylish posturing, such aesthetic truth is almost old-fashioned, an outdated virtue superseded by cheap, quick, well-paid productions of hacks (most "literary" writers are hacks, in my book). But Evelin Sullivan succeeds in rendering life so truthfully it leaves you shaken by the encounter. Only the highest art could produce such an effect.
Let me end this review by saying that it's a bone-chilling indictment of American literature (readers? editors? reviewers? a vast conspiracy? I'm not sure who to blame) that you haven't heard more about Evelin Sullivan. She is a true genius, who writes exquisite prose and crafts gripping plots, but who has been inexplicably ignored by literary taste-makers, and is hence undiscovered by intelligent readers who would certainly share my belief that she is a writer of world-class talent, if they'd only heard of her! A real shame. But please don't take my words as the meaningless warbling of a fan -- put them to the test. Pick up "Games of the Blind," read the first thirty or forty pages, and see if you have not fallen into the book's dark clutches. I'll wager you a beer at the Showdown Saloon here in Austin that you will not be able to put it down.
(If you enjoy "Games of the Blind" -- and if you're a "good" [meaning literate, astute, attuned to the nuances of language, both its surfaces and depths as careful choices of the author] reader I don't see how you can't enjoy it -- you should also read Sullivan's book "The Correspondence," which is quite different from "Games of the Blind" but every bit as brilliant. A thick and boisterously comic novel, by and large, but very poignant and inflected with similarly dark themes as "Games of the Blind.")
Malogamand
This yarn centers itself around the character and the voice of Paul Avery, a professional psychologist and convicted murderer. From the jail cell Avery tells the long story of his life beginning with unusal parents, a trip to Italy, and his failed first love at fourteen with an older married woman. He moves to Chicago and lives with his Uncle's family, where he learns sadism with his younger, chubby female cousin.
The claustrophobic narrative is recalled in pleasant loops of important and detailed fragments. As a psychologist, the obsessive Avery tends to over-analyze his motives and his actions. All which tend to sound like a self-indulgent person who has never heard of stopping for perspective and compassion.
Avery then leads us on a baroque joruney on the drak origins and the meaning of the murder. We never know whether we are being conned or not. We are are being manipulated to a certain extent. Sullivan adds a few theoretical interludes in this three part tragedy, which adds to the anti-academic tone of the whole book.
Things get interesting as Avery meets Michelle, then has an affair with her, and devises to kill her husband. Michelle is Avery's patient. It's strange how he has a great understanding of her, but little self-awareness of himself. But this is a temporary understanding, because Avery has been a trapped man in a maze for quite a while. His killing of the wrong person, a professor, is yet another sign of his self-delusion. Avery lives in an imaginary world, but never comes to terms with society around him.
A major theme of this book is the impossibility of mastery over anture: whether through technology or science. Evelin Sullivan is an important writer that needs a second look. Sullivan picks up the ball where Nabokov left it, and she projects an interesting and literate novel herself.
Wilalmaine
I stumbled upon this book two years ago in the public library. Waiting for my brother to check out, I just pulled it off the shelf, and it grabbed me from the first random lines I read. When I read the summary on the jacket, I checked it out and finished it in three days.
Evelin Sullivan uses incredible imagery and weaves words and word combinations, metephors etc. in such a way that you have to read some sections twice, but you don't mind, because once you comprehend the story she is relaying to you, you are taken aback and in awe of her talent.
I am not a professional writer, so my review is no where near as eloquent and impressive as this book, but do not let my lack of skill keep you from enjoying Ms. Sullivan's WEALTH of skill.
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