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eBook The Tattoo Artist: A Novel epub

by Jill Ciment

eBook The Tattoo Artist: A Novel epub
  • ISBN: 0375423257
  • Author: Jill Ciment
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: United States
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pantheon; First Edition edition (August 23, 2005)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • ePUB size: 1656 kb
  • FB2 size 1871 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf lrf doc


The Tattoo Artist: A Novel Hardcover – Deckle Edge, August 23, 2005. This is only the second book of Jill Ciment's I've read.

The Tattoo Artist: A Novel Hardcover – Deckle Edge, August 23, 2005. by. Jill Ciment (Author). Tattoo Artist is more of a self examination Sara and Philip,members of avant guard artist groups following WWI, struggle through the Depression, and find themselves stranded on an island paradise in 1938 in an attempt to collect the unique death masks carved by Ta'au'aans, the "Michelangelos of South Seas tattooing.

The Tattoo Artist book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Tattoo Artist: A Novel as Want to Read

The Tattoo Artist book. Start by marking The Tattoo Artist: A Novel as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jill Ciment was born in Montreal, Canada. Her books include two novels, Teeth of the Dog and The Law of Falling Bodies; a collection of short stories, Small Claims; and a memoir, Half a Life

Jill Ciment was born in Montreal, Canada. Her books include two novels, Teeth of the Dog and The Law of Falling Bodies; a collection of short stories, Small Claims; and a memoir, Half a Life. She has been awarded two New York State Foundation for the Arts Fellowships and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Ciment is a professor of English at the University of Florida. She lives in Gainesville, Florida.

Jill Ciment's new novel "The Tattoo Artist" is deceptively slender. Although it is only 207 pages long, it is stuffed with events, history, fascinating characters and important ideas. For these reasons, book groups will have a great time talking about this novel, especially the ending. She is the author of Small Claims, a collection of short stories and novellas; the novels Act of God, The Law of Falling Bodies, Teeth of the Dog, The Tattoo Artist, Heroic Measure. ore about Jill Ciment.

Part of Vintage Contemporaries. JILL CIMENT was born in Montreal, Canada.

Jill Ciment’s new novel, like her previous books, is beautifully written and reaches even beyond them as a stunning work of the imagination. I read The Tattoo Artist on one long plane ride, totally immersed and fascinated. Howard Zinn, author of A People’s History of the United States.

Around three, Philip made a dash for the swamp anyhow, and hauled back two of the masks. Blotting them off with our only blanket, he examined them in the beam of his flashlight. ds, Sara, what he tossed in the swamp. My God, either one of them will justify Richter’s investment in me. Don’t you think?. By nightfall, it was blowing and raining with the force of a fire hose. I couldn’t tell if we were in any danger, or if this was just a typical squall in the South Seas.

The Tattoo Artist : A Novel. Their lives over the next decade and a half form the first third of the book

The Tattoo Artist : A Novel. Their lives over the next decade and a half form the first third of the book. The story of an artist and her husband who go to a South Sea island to meet aboriginal people, who tattoo their bodies for art. They become stranded for 30 years.

The book gives guidelines to the reader first observation and then translating them into paper. For years, artist William O'Connor has traveled the globe, studying dragons in their natural environments. Посмотреть все изображения. La mano y el pie (The Hand and Feet Forma), Pr. . His findings, field notes and sketches have been compiled for the first time into this single, beautifully illustrated compendium-a natural and cultural history of the beasts as well as a step-by-step drawing workshop.

Jill Ciment’s writing has been called “luminous . . . sad, affecting” (Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times) and “rich in observation and insight” (Merle Rubin, Los Angeles Times). Now in her new novel, her third, Jill Ciment turns her eye to a painter’s world in the early years of the twentieth century and tells the story of an American woman, an acclaimed artist who’s been stranded on an island for thirty years.The novel opens in New York in the 1970s. Sara Ehrenreich has returned to New York to much fanfare—Life magazine has arranged for her return and is doing a big feature on her. Sara had been living on a remote speck in the South Pacific for three decades, and she has returned to the city of her childhood and early adulthood, a city made totally different by thirty years of technological and social change.As Sara experiences all of the sensations of entering a new world, the novel flashes back to tell the story of her life, of herself at eighteen, a Lower East Side shopgirl meeting the man who changes the course of her life—Philip Ehrenreich, a banker’s son and revolutionary, an avant-garde artist who hasn’t made art in years.Philip introduces Sara to everything from Dada to Marx, from free love to automatic drawing, from trayf to absinthe. Philip sees her art as his chance to create by proxy. They fall in love, marry, and form a collaboration, and by the late 1920s, she takes her place among a small group of famous American Modernists.As the Depression hits and his family money and her corps of collectors vanish, Philip and Sara are forced to embrace the proletarian life that he had romanticized and that she had fled. In desperation, they sell what is left of his prized collection of Oceanic masks, and their lives are forever altered when one of Philip’s patrons hires him to collect masks in the South Seas.Sara and Philip book passage on a Japanese ship that drops them off on Ta’un’uu, an island famous both for its masks and its full-body tattooing. The ship that was to pick them up never returns, bewilderment turns into panic, then resignation, and, finally, to a peace neither husband nor wife has known before. When the Second World War breaks out months later and Philip and half the men of the island are killed by Japanese soldiers, Sara turns to her painting for salvation. She learns the art of tattooing and begins the painting that will be her masterpiece—the tattooing of her own body.A beautifully written novel, powerful in its portrayal of the world it creates and the ideas it is taken up with—ideas of immortality through art, and of the here-and-now-ness of life and experience.
Comments: (7)
Ce
The Tattoo Artist is as unique a book as I've ever read. It is brilliant in its conception and completion. I loved both the story and the metaphors. It is a book that will have you in its grip for a long time.

Sara and Philip Ehrenreich meet in New York in the early 20th century. Both are jewish activists. However, Sara comes from poverty and Philip from money. They are both avant-garde in their beliefs and love the world of art, culture, and revolution. Philip wishes more than anything that he could create art but he lacks that real gift. Sara, however, has it, and she becomes a celebrity in her own right. They end up partnering but their relationship is very open and experimental from the beginning. All is well until the depression hits and Philip loses everything. They are backed by a wealthy patron who has been impressed by Philip's mask collection and they head to the South Seas to collect masks from the Ta'un'uuans.

Once they reach their destination, unbeknownst to them, they will remain on this island for thirty years. Their first impression of the island and its inhabitants is mind-blowing. All the islanders are tattooed and their first view of them is like watching a moving tapestry. At first, Sara assumes that the beauty of the island is the inspiration for all their tattoos. Gradually she realizes how wrong she is. Their tattoos, which cover their whole bodies, including their tongues and the soles of their feet, tell stories, narratives of lives lived and lives lost. Through a series of unexpected events, Sara finds herself tattooed all over as well.

The prologue to the book introduces us to Sara and her tattoos. She is responsible for all of their design except for the tattoos on her face. "My tattoos, like all the tattoos of my island, are a pictorial narrative, an illustrated personal history, though not necessarily a chronological one." Every inch of her body is covered with her story, illustrated by the tattoos she carries with her always.

This is a book to savor, to question, to appreciate in all its beauty. It is one of a kind and Ms. Ciment has created a masterpiece.
Onath
This is only the second book of Jill Ciment's I've read. Whereas on the surface it shares little with Heroic Measures, there are undercurrents that give a picture of an author with a specific point of view regarding displacement. Tattoo Artist is more of a self examination Sara and Philip,members of avant guard artist groups following WWI, struggle through the Depression, and find themselves stranded on an island paradise in 1938 in an attempt to collect the unique death masks carved by Ta'au'aans, the "Michelangelos of South Seas tattooing." Sara is telling her story from the vantage of 1970, after thirty years spent with "her" tribe, finding a city in which television, walks on the moon, skyscrapers and all the "advancements" of the intervening 30 years has transformed the world as she knew it. She observes like Rip Van Winkle, questioning her place in either of the two worlds she's known. On the basis of these two books, I look forward to reading just about anything that Ms. Ciment writes.
Hbr
Stories told primarily in flashback either work or they fail spectacularly. I am pleased to state that The Tattoo Artist succeeds.

The main character, Sara, has returned to New York after decades of living on an island in the South Pacific. While there, she had been tattooed with the important events of her life until most of her body is covered. These tattoos are used as a framing device for the story, much like Bradbury's Illustrated Man. However, in this instance the ink tells the story of her life. We flashback to 1930s New York where Sara is living the life of a Bohemian artist.

I do not want to say much more than that for fear of spoiling one of the memorable scenes (of which there are many). There are moments of intense joy and heart rending sadness. The reader follows Sara as she changes, redefining herself and her concepts of family, friendships, and home.

Beautifully written and crafted, The Tattoo Artist is a brilliant novel which has been enshrined on my To Read Again shelf.
Mamuro
Jill Ciment's new novel "The Tattoo Artist" is deceptively slender. Although it is only 207 pages long, it is stuffed with events, history, fascinating characters and important ideas. For these reasons, book groups will have a great time talking about this novel, especially the ending.

As someone who reads novels almost exclusively and who has read almost all of Ciment's work, I think she makes a leap with this book that is similar to the one made by novelist Andrea Barrett in her marvelous book "Ship Fever," which won the National Book Award. Ciment has pushed herself to a whole new level as a writer here. As usual, her prose is spare and taut, and that works very effectively in the service of her tale about a "primitive" society. I couldn't put this book down, and I can't stop thinking about it.
Best West
did not like this book. having said that i did finish it which i usually do not do if i hate the characters but for some reason i did finish. don't know if it was because we read it for our book group and i needed to discuss it or it was intriguing and i just could not imagine where it was going and had to know, but i did finish it.
i would be interested to see what the author writes next as you can tell she has a vivid imagination!!
Cha
Extremely well written has a good flow and keeps the reader's interest. The story has many layers of interaction which prompted hours of conversation in our book group.

I recommend for someone who wants an enjoyable pleasure read or those who like digging into the meaning behind the author's choice of words.
Helo
This is a brilliantly rendered work of literary art--multi-leveled and rich with the really inexplicable human condition. It's an again and again must read. Thank you, Jill Ciment! Accolades to you for creating and sharing this treasure!
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