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eBook The Kissing List epub

by Stephanie Reents

eBook The Kissing List epub
  • ISBN: 0307951820
  • Author: Stephanie Reents
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Women's Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hogarth; First Edition edition (May 22, 2012)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1640 kb
  • FB2 size 1828 kb
  • Formats rtf doc lrf mobi


Other author's books: The Kissing List.

Published in the United States by Hogarth, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York. Reents, Stephanie, 1970–. The kissing list, Stephanie Reents. Other author's books: The Kissing List.

Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

It’s nice to be writing on an advance, she notes

It’s nice to be writing on an advance, she notes. eges, your locker partner and confidante from seventh grade onward. You have long admired her intelligence, her beautiful sentences, the way she could hunker down in the hallway right before class and scribble out a perfect compare/contrast essay on Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now, the only two things you remember studying in AP English.

Books and Authors, The Kissing List, Stephanie Reents.

The Kissing List by Stephanie Reents Four young women connect at Oxford and together move to New York. Here’s an urban tale about jobs, roommates, dating, et. all that stuff that confronts any woman first on her own in the city

The Kissing List by Stephanie Reents Four young women connect at Oxford and together move to New York. all that stuff that confronts any woman first on her own in the city. Funny and fresh, if there’s a reference to Sex and the City, we didn’t find it.

Shot through with laugh-out-loud lines, yet still wrenchingly emotional and resonant, The Kissing List is a book about women who bravely defy expectations and take outrageous chances in the face of living a life that might turn out to be anything less than extraordinary.

After a post-college year abroad at Oxford, Sylvie moves to New York City to begin a life full of possibility. From new jobs to new friends to new kissing partners

After a post-college year abroad at Oxford, Sylvie moves to New York City to begin a life full of possibility. After a post-college year abroad at Oxford, Sylvie moves to New York City to begin a life full of possibility. From new jobs to new friends to new kissing partners, her future is hers to create. But each exciting life she envisions is inevitably shadowed with potential disappointment: the stultifying temp job, the disastrous first date, the surprising and heartbreaking loss of friends, lovers, and roommates.

In Stephanie Reents’s connected stories, young women navigate an early adulthood cluttered with discarded .

In Stephanie Reents’s connected stories, young women navigate an early adulthood cluttered with discarded relationships. The characters whose lives are loosely connected in Stephanie Reents’s first story collection, The Kissing List, wade waist-deep through the muck of uncertainty that awaits college women after graduation. Reents’s characters are as sharp as they are sly, as intellectually brilliant as they are oddball.

The interlocking stories in The Kissing List feature an unforgettable group of young women – Sylvie, Anna .

The interlocking stories in The Kissing List feature an unforgettable group of young women – Sylvie, Anna, Frances, Maureen – as their lives connect, first during a year abroad at Oxford, then later as they move to New York on the cusp of adulthood. We follow each of them as they navigate the treachery of first dates, temp jobs and roommates, failed relationships and unexpected affairs – all the things that make their lives seem full of possibility, but also rife with potential disappointment.

An inventive debut that recalls the imagination of Aimee Bender and the sardonic wit of Lorrie Moore.The interlocking stories in The Kissing List feature an unforgettable group of young women – Sylvie, Anna, Frances, Maureen – as their lives connect, first during a year abroad at Oxford, then later as they move to New York on the cusp of adulthood. We follow each of them as they navigate the treachery of first dates, temp jobs and roommates, failed relationships and unexpected affairs – all the things that make their lives seem full of possibility, but also rife with potential disappointment. Shot through with laugh-out-loud lines, yet still wrenchingly emotional and resonant, The Kissing List is a book about women who bravely defy expectations and take outrageous chances in the face of a life that might turn out to be anything less than extraordinary.
Comments: (7)
Nidora
Like another reviewer, I should state that I also was in grad school with the author, although we barely knew one another, and the only time we have met since 2000 was last year, very briefly, when she didn't recognize me until I told her who I was. So I venture to hope that I can be completely objective. I really thought this a terrific collection of stories, funny, smart, with plenty of moving moments--particularly as the female protagonists get a little older and a little more disillusioned than they are at the beginning. Reents never resorts to sentimentality, and her psychological insight is striking. It's true, as my fellow U. of Arizona alumnus says, that her subjects are mainly well-off, well-educated white girls, and it's true that there are plenty of other books with such main characters. However, I think it's unfair to criticize the author for her subject matter. The reviewer wanted her to write about poverty and issues of social justice. Well, she didn't: that's the book he should write. What she's given us is a highly engaging collection, written in a voice that is reminiscent at times of Lorrie Moore's, as someone has noted, and yet retains its own uniqueness. My only reservation was that at times I got mixed up about which character was which, not only because there were quite a few of them, but also because they seemed a trifle similar. Nevertheless, this is a debut collection, and no one's first book is perfect (and for that matter, neither are their others!) The book deserves to be much better known than it is, and Reents will, I hope, become a very well-known author with her next book. It's very rare that literary fiction is as enjoyable as this.
Nilabor
There's something distinctive about that moment in your post-college life when you're living in a series of crappy apartments, working at improbable jobs, hooking up with all sort of odd people. Stephanie Reents captures it exactly in The Kissing List. In each story, we get a glimpse into the lives of one of several connected characters. These young women are smart, self-aware and fumbling their way through. They're at an age when they believe, as one of the character says, "you'll change and become a better version of yourself, but really, you just wind up being a little more tolerant of the person you've always been." It's a joy to read lines like this (and the book is full of them) that demonstrate the gifts of an author who has an incredible ear for the things people say - and the things people think but don't often admit.
I was excited to read this book, plowed right through it, and only wished it could have gone on longer! It's a great read for a twentysomething who is living through this time of life - or anyone else who wants to re-live it.
Kulalas
Just read the book in one sitting. Trust me when I say if you start it, you won't stop.

What a terrific read! What fantastic characters! What a Herculean task to build momentum the way Reents does while stringing together short interconnected stories of different characters who cross over in time. To read it is to love it; to think about it is to truly appreciate the art and skill it takes to craft this collection.

Reents' voice is familiar and yet fresh, powerful yet subtle. Reading the Kissing List feels like being at the Stone Pony back in the early 70's; this is a new and refreshing voice and some day people will swear they were there at the beginning. Buy it and read it now and gain the satisfaction to know that when some day comes, you'll be telling the truth.
Banal
Full disclosure: Steph Reents is a former colleague and I consider her a friend.
So, I may be too kind, or I may be over-exercising my brand of loyalty, which reserves unvarnished critique for my dearest.
I give the Kissing List only three stars.
I've dithered over this for about six months, maybe to prevent my great expectations of Reents from hurting all-important early sales or maybe because I couldn't make up my mind.
The writing is good (as expected from Reents. She's an exacting wordsmith).
I give it three stars because the Kissing List seems to have succumbed to the reality of New York publishing: which is comically in-bred. Contracts are rewarded to chroniclers of Manhattan and the Ivy League Life at the expense of almost everyone else.
The modern stewards of American letters (like her and her editor and publisher) are building a modern canon that caters to the narrowing circle of wealth and education and too-rarely tiptoes into the messy realities of the country as a whole.
We'll look back on this kind of fiction (inevitably set on campuses, in i-banks and law firms and peopled with the inheritors of wealth) as a symptom of what went wrong on our watch: the concerns of the wealthy and the powerful made our fellow citizens invisible in a way guaranteed to make literature a hated tool of oppression.
Sure, part of Reents' point in these stories is that even the every-privilege-provided young princes and princesses of i-banking and social entrepreneurship get the blues. And the meta-story is that it's very hard to like any of these people, so self-absorbed are they.
But this kind of fiction explores inequality among the richest Americans, and without irony. At least Fitzgerald rubbed our noses in inequality at every chance.
Reents knows more of the world than these stories let on, which is why the Kissing List is so frustrating.
As a journalist trolling the back-of-beyond, she saw what American poverty looks like, what benighted isolation and ignorance beget and how very many Others there are out there who would be more likely to speak in Latin than to nod knowingly at the stories' references to the designers and locales and fellowships that are the irritating props of conversation among America's owners.
These characters appear to have no idea that obscure American millions lack the basics so that the Manhattan game will go on.
What I fear when I read The Kissing List is this: Reents either cynically shaped her manuscript to appeal to the 1%-er darlings in publishing, or her editor cynically shaped the manuscript to get past a publishing committee of 1%-er darlings.
If you're not from the club, it's comical to watch the Times Book Review get revved up about "My Salinger Year," the latest memoir/novel about a post-graduate year in publishing, written by a privileged whitey from Cambridge, MA, and reviewed by a fellow privileged whitey from Cambridge.
Sure, you could argue the world waits with baited breath for those books, and that the Times has a professional obligation to call attention...but you'd be soaking wet.
I write this review as a challenge more to Reents' editor and publisher than to Reents.
Torture this writer with Smith Henderson's "Fourth of July Creek." Tell her you want her next book to speak profanely and passionately to an audience that doesn't know what an Exonian is.
Don't waste this talent.
Ddilonyne
I get the whole interlocking stories of time and place thing but this book is simply all of the place in a bad way. Was a struggle to finish - nothing about this book made me want to turn to the next page. save your time and money
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