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eBook If on a Winter's Night a Traveler epub

by Willliam Weaver,Italo Calvino

eBook If on a Winter's Night a Traveler epub
  • ISBN: 0919630235
  • Author: Willliam Weaver,Italo Calvino
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: World Literature
  • Publisher: Harvest (1981)
  • Pages: 260 pages
  • ePUB size: 1650 kb
  • FB2 size 1570 kb
  • Formats rtf azw doc azw


If on a winter's night a traveler (Italian: Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore) is a 1979 novel by the Italian writer Italo Calvino

If on a winter's night a traveler (Italian: Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore) is a 1979 novel by the Italian writer Italo Calvino. The postmodernist narrative, in the form of a frame story, is about the reader trying to read a book called If on a winter's night a traveler. Each chapter is divided into two sections. The first section of each chapter is in second person, and describes the process the reader goes through to attempt to read the next chapter of the book he or she is reading

Italo Calvino imagines a novel capable of endless mutations in this intricately crafted story about writing and readers. If on a Winter's Night a Traveler turns out to be not one novel but ten.

Italo Calvino imagines a novel capable of endless mutations in this intricately crafted story about writing and readers. Condition: Used: Acceptable. The cover of the book shows a fair amount of wear. Please note that the cover is different than the one shown. A few pages are dog-eared.

Italo Calvino was also a member and, as an Oulipian experiment, he created If on a Winter's Night a Traveler using the ‘semiotic square’ as a basic model, a concept he borrowed from A J Greimas’ book about semiotics called 'Du Sens'

Italo Calvino was also a member and, as an Oulipian experiment, he created If on a Winter's Night a Traveler using the ‘semiotic square’ as a basic model, a concept he borrowed from A J Greimas’ book about semiotics called 'Du Sens'. Here's a brief description of Calvino's method as he outlines it in La Bibliothèque Oulipienne Volume II

Books by Italo Calvino. If on a winter’s night a traveler. Translation of Se una notte d’invemo un viaggiatore.

Books by Italo Calvino. A Helen and Kurt Wolff book.

If on a winters night a traveler. Italo Calvino (1923-1985) was born in Cuba and grew up in San Remo, Italy. He began as an essayist and a journalist but is best known for his fiction, including "Invisible Cities, If On a Winter's Night a Traveler, Marcovaldo, " and "Mr. Palomar. 3. 2. 34. 54. Авторские права. Библиографические данные. If on a winter's night a traveler A Helen and Kurt Wolff Bk Harvest book.

Introduction by Peter Washington; Translation by William Weaver Italo Calvino’s masterpiece combines a. .Calvino is that very rare phenomenon, a true original.

Introduction by Peter Washington; Translation by William Weaver Italo Calvino’s masterpiece combines a love story and a detective story. If on a winter’s night a traveler is breathtakingly complex and self-conscious (there are moments when it quite literally makes one gasp with astonishment). from the Introduction by Peter Washington.

Italo Calvino, Italian journalist, short-story writer, and novelist whose whimsical and imaginative fables made him one of the most important Italian fiction writers in the . Academia - "If on a Winter's Night a Traveller (Calvino)". Article Contributors.

Italo Calvino, Italian journalist, short-story writer, and novelist whose whimsical and imaginative fables made him one of the most important Italian fiction writers in the 20th century. Calvino left Cuba for Italy in his youth.

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Comments: (7)
Uylo
"You are about to begin reading Italo Calvino’s new novel, If on a Winter's Night a Traveler."

Thus begins Chapter 1, Part 1 of Italo Calvino’s "if on a winter's night a traveler", and if you believe for one second that the traveler finally placed in a train station – note the cover illustration - in Part 2 is ever going to get anywhere, you are very much mistaken. He’ll never even get past Chapter 1, Part 2. He is, in fact, never seen again.

*C1P1: Chapter 1, Part 1. Each of the first 10 chapters are divided into 2 parts, the first with the reader as narrator and the second purporting to be the first chapter of yet another novel

Nor are any of the other protagonists in Parts 2 of Chapters 2 through 10. Calvino’s protagonist is actually the reader from C1P1* who spends the rest of the novel searching for the rest of the story – or stories, as it turns out, because there are ten first chapters of ten different novels – so the novel itself is never about a traveler, or about Malbork, the steep slope, fear of wind or vertigo, the gathering shadow, a network of lines that embrace and or intersect, the carpet of leaves, an empty grave, or even, finally, “what story down there awaits its end?” Although, as it turns out, the first lines of each of the ten chapters finally make up a story outline of its own, a story outline that might even, if followed through, complete a novel called, If on a winter’s night a traveler …”

Confusing? I’d say so. I’m not a huge fan of the nouveau-novel (I just made up that term) – novels that seem to be so self-referring that they are more chore than pleasure to read.

And yet I was so taken with C1P1 – Calvino takes us on a journey through a bookstore to find his new novel and then curls us up, like a fussy cat, searching for the perfect place and atmosphere in which to read it – that I read the whole thing. Because it seems to be a novel about reading, about the relationship of a reader to the thing read, and even to the writer of the thing read. Each new beginning leaves us wanting more, and the search for more never satisfies – it only initiates another search for something that doesn’t exist – which in turn initiates … Oh, well. You get the gist.

What is it about enigmatic Italian writers anyway? I read Umberto Eco, too, even the Latin, French, or German parts which I convince myself I can comprehend if I read them out loud – like shouting in my own ear in a foreign tongue thinking I can make myself understood through sheer volume. And I like it.

Somewhere in the house is another Calvino novel, Invisible Cities . I haven’t even opened it yet. I do hope it isn’t full of blank pages, because I’m not sure I could even begin to suss out the invisible joke there. There’s enigmatic and then there’s enigmatic, ya know?
betelgeuze
You have to read this fascinating treatise on reading and writing. I've seen others complain about the weak ending and the lack of structure, but for chrissakes, it's not a Dragonlance novel- it's avant-garde prose. But that doesn't mean it's not accessible. Unlike Andre Breton's shoelace knots of words that you have to dwell on endlessly to untie, Italo Calvino is so easy to read that the prose slips past you a little too quickly. But that doesn't mean it's not worth reading in the first place- Originally I checked this out at my college library and when I finished it, I bought a copy for myself and another copy for a friend. It's extremely hard to describe the book appropriately, but I'm hoping my enthusiasm for it will get my message across- Calvino's insights are worth the price of the book alone, and this fragmented narrative marked by stretches of crystalline, dreamlike beauty make what would normally be a dry work of literature philosophy into a vivid sensual book that I'll probably continue to re-read for the rest of my life.
Raniconne
Interesting but difficult to follow. The book is designed that way and became more interesting and readable the deeper I delved into it. I was reading this for book club and may have stopped reading if it wasn't for the others in the group pressure to finish it.
Ranenast
I am in agreement with the fourth and fifth readers. Just as I am the sum of my experiences and each experience exists, not on its own but as a single episode in a much larger narrative, I cannot help but making each book I read "part of that overall and unitary book that is the sum of all my readings." Cosmicomics is the first book I read by Italo Calvino, and I could not help but search for shades of that in this book as I transformed it and allowed it to "enter into a relationship with the books I have read previously, [to] become their corollary or development or confutation or glass or reference text." I often wonder how my opinion of a book - or anything I consume - would change if I could consume that thing without the influence of me. This particular book certainly gave me cause to ponder that question rather extensively. Which, given what I was hoping to find in the pages, was really quite a surprise.

I think I was looking for a love story. I want to share words on a page with someone. I want to think that another pair of eyes is taking in the same words as mine and transforming them in their own unique way to fit their own unique overall and unitary book. I want to delve into our shared experience and take apart the details of how and why we were affected so differently and marvel at the ways in which we were affected similarly. I've felt that shared experience before, long to feel it again, and believed that this book was going to take me on that journey once more. I wanted to see the ups and downs of a relationship related by and existing within the shared words and thoughts of others. I wanted the hero and the heroine, "having passed all tests, get married" and not die. So from the outset, I fell in love with this book. The point-of-view, the internal dialogue, the fear and the hope... everything was related beautifully, and I easily lost myself in pursuit of that Other Reader.

As the story progressed, however, I felt like I was losing my grasp on the love story I thought I was reading. I tried to read into each of the external novels something affecting the overall story... something tying it all together... something that made me see how our two readers were growing closer with their reading. Once the two separated over the boundary line of those who make books and those who read them, I think the author finally shook me free from my preconceived notions of what I was reading. While I felt like the stories themselves certainly became easier to understand and stood more on their own after the Cimmerian episodes, I also was able to change my focus and begin to enjoy each episode on its own much more fully than I had before. It was as though he was trying to teach me how to step outside of my unitary book and value these snippets of different times and places without resolution solely for their existence. Once I got that, I began enjoying the individual stories as much, if not more than, the framing device of the love story. Was it possible to consume these new narratives in something approaching a vacuum? I was getting there.

I believe I had about half the book to read with my new point-of-view, but while I enjoyed it, I still couldn't get what I wanted to see out of my mind. This was becoming a 3-star review, but it had to wait for the end. I was so scared that this book would end without an ending and leave me searching for non-existent resolutions. Rarely have I had such anticipation for the end of a novel to tie things back together and let me resume my normal breathing pattern. And not since One Hundred Years of Solitude (Everyman's Library (Cloth)) 1st (first) Edition by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Gregory Rabassa published by Everyman's Library (1995) has the ending paid off so brilliantly. See? Even now I am attempting to transform this book and fit it into my greater story. So to watch Calvino turn this around on me and bring everything to a wholly satisfying and twisting conclusion was an absolute pleasure.

I am, as he said, "always a possible me." "The only truth I can write is that of the instant I am living," and I am pleased to write this now as the me who exists today. There was much here that simply aligned with my life and my current reading habits. I do not know if I would feel the same about this book had, "I read it when I retired... since then I think that it wouldn't be the same thing anymore." As it is, I am pleased with the resolutions, intrigued by the storylines, and amazed by the author's ability to pull me out and around myself to make this somewhat academic study on the nature of writing, reading, and being read flow and fill up my mind without me even really seeing it happen.

There is more to say, but I will have to do it later and as a new person. But for now I need, "just a moment... I have almost finished If on a Winter's Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino."
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