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eBook The Journey: A Novel (Modern Library Classics) epub

by Peter Filkins,H. G. Adler

eBook The Journey: A Novel (Modern Library Classics) epub
  • ISBN: 0812978315
  • Author: Peter Filkins,H. G. Adler
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: World Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Modern Library (September 8, 2009)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1293 kb
  • FB2 size 1445 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf azw docx


Peter Filkins is an acclaimed translator and the recipient of a Berlin Prize fellowship in 2005 from the American Academy in Berlin, among other honors. According to the translator, Peter Filkins, it is one of only four books of fiction written in German by Jewish survivors of the camps.

Peter Filkins is an acclaimed translator and the recipient of a Berlin Prize fellowship in 2005 from the American Academy in Berlin, among other honors. He teaches writing and literature at Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Series: Modern Library Classics.

Adler died in London in 1988. Peter Filkins is an acclaimed translator and the recipient of a Berlin Prize fellowship from the American Academy in Berlin.

Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Adler died in London in 1988.

For Adler, the lingering effect of his experience is disorientation, and his novel brings that feeling . MODERN LIBRARY and the TORCHBEARER Design. The journey: a novel, H. G. Adler; translated from German by Peter Filkins. p. cm. eISBN: 978-1-58836-820-1.

For Adler, the lingering effect of his experience is disorientation, and his novel brings that feeling to life. Bold unconventionalit. tartles like a gunshot. extraordinarily ambitious attempt to articulate the unspeakable. There is an old Hasidic saying: If you carry your own lantern, you will endure the dark.

Items related to The Journey: A Novel (Modern Library Classics). Peter Filkins is an acclaimed translator and the recipient of a Berlin Prize fellowship in 2005 from the American Academy in Berlin, among other honors

Items related to The Journey: A Novel (Modern Library Classics). Home H. Adler The Journey: A Novel (Modern Library Classics). The Journey: A Novel (Modern Library Classics). ISBN 10: 0812978315, ISBN 13: 9780812978315. Published by Modern Library, 2009. Peter Filkins is an acclaimed translator and the recipient of a Berlin Prize fellowship in 2005 from the American Academy in Berlin, among other honors.

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Published for the first time in English, Panorama is a superb rediscovered novel of the Holocaust by a neglected modern master. One of a handful of death camp survivors to fictionalize his experiences in German, H. Adler is an essential author-referenced by W. Sebald in his classic novel Austerlitz, and a direct literary descendant of Kafka. When The Journey was discovered in a Harvard bookshop and translated by Peter Filkins, it began a major reassessment of the Prague-born H. Adler by literary critics and historians alike.

Peter Filkins is an acclaimed translator and the recipient of a Berlin Prize fellowship in 2005 from the American Academy in Berlin . The Journey: A Novel Modern Library Classics. Перевод: Peter Filkins. Random House Publishing Group, 2011.

This novel, written in 1956 was not published until 1989. It is now translated from the German by Peter Filkins who also provides very helpful plot summary and character descriptions at the end of the book.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). This novel, written in 1956 was not published until 1989. Since the book is dreamlike and out of time sequence, this is most useful. Adler survived many concentration camps, although upon transfer to Auschwitz, his wife (a medical doctor) and her mother were immediately murdered.

The journey : a novel. by. Adler, H. G; Filkins, Peter. Columbia University Libraries. New York : Random House. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. ark:/13960/t16m46k6n.

G. Adler, Peter Filkins (TRN) The Journey. Price for Eshop: 337 Kč (€ 1. ). You can ask us about this book and we'll send an answer to your e-mail.

Here is “a rich and lyrical masterpiece”–notes Peter Constantine–the first translation of a lost treasure by acclaimed author H. G. Adler, a survivor of Theresienstadt and Auschwitz. Written in 1950, after Adler’s emigration to England, The Journey was ignored by large publishing houses after the war and not released in Germany until 1962. Depicting the Holocaust in a unique and deeply moving way, and avoiding specific mention of country or camps–even of Nazis and Jews–The Journey is a poetic nightmare of a family’s ordeal and one member’s survival. Led by the doctor patriarch Leopold, the Lustig family finds itself “forbidden” to live, enduring in a world in which “everyone was crazy, and once they finally recognized what was happening it was too late.” Linked by its innovative style to the work of James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, The Journey portrays the unimaginable in a way that anyone interested in recent history and modern literature must read.
Comments: (4)
Uanabimo
Written in 1950, published in Germany in 1962 (overcoming orchestrated opposition from the German publishing establishment), but appearing in English only in 2008, THE JOURNEY occupies an important and unique place in Holocaust literature. According to the translator, Peter Filkins, it is one of only four books of fiction written in German by Jewish survivors of the camps. And among the hundreds of Holocaust novels published since, it must be the only one with its particular point of view, located neither in time nor place (the word "Auschwitz," for instance, never appears), but in a kind of bird's eye view from above, as a continuous journey of the soul unmarked by obvious way-stages, even that of ultimate extinction. In his brilliant introduction, which is essential reading before attempting the book, Filkins cites Hölderlin speaking of a "synoptic view across the barrier of death," a slow-motion Totentanz that defies time.

At one point, Adler evokes the image of a line of prisoners, hands on the shoulders of the one in front, shuffling along day and night, a "mute ghost train in no need of tracks to run on." Were this to be taken to its conclusion, he says, "time would be erased. The journey would have only a direction, but no destination. It would continue and yet lead nowhere. Senseless would be the question about where you were born, for the day of your death could come long before the day of your conception." Where other Holocaust writers portray Hell, Adler concentrates on Limbo. Such story as there is in the book is a thin fictionalization of his own family history, spending much of the war in Theresienstadt,* the so-called "safe community" for Jews, in which they were kept in suspended animation for several years before the inevitable transportation to Auschwitz. Adler's father, an elderly physician, died of starvation, as does his alter ego in the book, Dr. Leopold Lustig. His mother, sister, and aunt went to the gas chamber; their fictional equivalents merely disappear in a cloud of metaphor. Paul Lustig (Adler himself) is the sole survivor.

The writing ranges from the abstrusely philosophical to the a Kafkaesque surrealism or Orwellian doublespeak: "The forbidden is at last behind you for good, and now eternal freedom is waving you on. [...] We wish we had the chance to share your lot, but unfortunately that has been denied us. With us lies the responsibility to worry about your well-being, and then to worry about your brothers who are also awaiting the journey." The voice here is presumably that of the despatching railroad officials in Prague, but Adler jumps around so freely that you soon no longer know whether this is the language of the oppressors, or the oppressed buying into it. This is not a normal novel by any standards, an intensely difficult book to read** (hence only 4 stars), but its difficulty is necessary to the subject.

The camp gates open almost unnoticed, and there are still 100 pages to go. Paul drags himself along the road to another Limbo: this time, one of rubble, where Aryans and Jews alike are victims. Adler calls it Unkenburg -- literally Toad City, but with overtones of deception or unknowing. It is a place where nobody recognizes anybody or anything, nobody knows the future, nobody fully acknowledges the past. A housewife, enclosed in her still-intact apartment, asks him: "Was it really so horrible? There have been so many lies. Indeed, no offense, but at the very least it doesn't appear that respectable people were taken away." Captain Dudley, the American officer in charge of refugees, is too busy trading cigarettes for old medals to give Paul the time of day. But Paul does meet at least one Good Samaritan, a Herr Brantel, who asks him "to just remember that in the country whose people had robbed him of everything precious and dear there were still decent people." And Paul/Adler does remember, as a ray of light even in this nightmare record of the death of the soul.

* Here called deceptively "Ruhenthal" or "Vale of Rest."
**Try deciphering a few sentences like this: "For indeed, we are our own creation; whether we are denied or accepted at our final end, when one must answer for oneself, much more depends, namely the flourishing of a world that, out of its deepest despair and highest aspirations, is called upon to form its own, in a certain sense, eternal countenance amid the destruction of our only meaningful yet impalpable achievement, one accomplished in and for itself without the participation and help of the world at large."
DrayLOVE
This.book is a haunting story of the persecution of the Jewish people during Hitler's reign of terror. The imagery and symbolism implied lets you know what was happening without directly stating it. The meaning and value of.life is elevated to its rightful.place in the midst of tragedy and loss as portrayed in this story. It is a literary masterpiece.
Kazijora
This long lost novel is totally unique in the annals of Holocaust literature. It, in veiled and novelistically transformed manner, tells the author's own tale of descent into the madness of WW II, various concentration and labor camps, and ultimate survival and re-emergence into the world of the living. His poetic style enables one to experience the disorientation and near-madness resulting from total dehumanization by a group of others. I cannot recommend it more highly.
BORZOTA
Art is not dead after Auschwitz; Adler proves it in an intellectually compelling way. The style of narration is as challenging as the subject-matter. Journey is a work for those who can read.
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