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eBook Against Nature (A Rebours) (Penguin Classics) epub

by Joris-Karl Huysmans,Patrick Mcguiness,Robert Baldick

eBook Against Nature (A Rebours) (Penguin Classics) epub
  • ISBN: 0140447636
  • Author: Joris-Karl Huysmans,Patrick Mcguiness,Robert Baldick
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: World Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Revised edition (February 24, 2004)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1521 kb
  • FB2 size 1200 kb
  • Formats mobi doc lrf docx


Against Nature: A Rebours (Oxford World's Classics).

Against Nature: A Rebours (Oxford World's Classics).

Against Nature (A Rebours). Huysmans died in 1907. Robert Baldick (. 972) translated widely from the French and wrote a biography of Huysmans

Against Nature (A Rebours). 972) translated widely from the French and wrote a biography of Huysmans. Customers who bought this item also bought.

Download books for free. Against Nature (Penguin Classics). Joris-Karl Huysmans, Robert Baldick (translator).

Paperback, Penguin Classics, 242 pages ― Joris-Karl Huysmans, Against the Grain.

With a title translated either as Against Nature or as Against The. The original handbook of decadence, Against Nature exploded like a grenade (in the words of its author) and has enjoyed a cult readership from its publication to the present da. .Paperback, Penguin Classics, 242 pages. Published May 1st 2003 by Penguin (first published 1884). 0140447636 (ISBN13: 9780140447637). Joris-Karl Huysmans, Against the Grain.

is translated by Robert Baldick with an introduction by Patrick McGuinness in Penguin Classics. A wildly original fin-de-siècle novel, Against Nature contains only one character. Des Esseintes is a decadent, ailing aristocrat who retreats to an isolated villa where her indulges his taste for luxury and excess. Joris-Karl Huysmans (1848–1907) is recognized as one of the most challenging and innovative figures in European literature and acknowledged as principal architect of the fin-de-siècle imagination. He was a career civil servant who wrote ten novels, most notably A Rebour. ore about Joris-Karl Huysmans.

Infamous as the inspiration for the novel which slowly corrupts Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray, Joris-Karl Huysmans' Against Nature (A Rebours) is translated by Robert Baldick with an introduction by Patrick McGuinness in Penguin Classics. Joris-Karl Huysmans (1848-1907) is now recognized as one of the most challenging and innovative figures in European literature and an acknowledged principal architect of the fin-de-siècle imagination. He was a career civil servant who wrote ten novels, most notably A Rebours and Là-Bas.

Items related to Against Nature (A Rebours) (Penguin Classics). Joris-Karl Huysmans Against Nature (A Rebours) (Penguin Classics). ISBN 13: 9780140447637. is translated by Robert Baldick with an introduction by Patrick McGuinness in Penguin Classics.

rebours (1884) is a novel by the French writer Joris-Karl Huysmans. The narrative centers on a single character: Jean des Esseintes, an eccentric, reclusive, ailing aesthete. The last scion of an aristocratic family, Des Esseintes loathes nineteenth century bourgeois society and tries to retreat into an ideal artistic world of his own creation

Against Nature - Joris-Karl Huysmans.

Against Nature - Joris-Karl Huysmans. Decadence from Dedalus. Translated with an introduction and notes by Brendan King. Huysmans by Robert Baldick. A wildly original fin-de-siecle novel, Against Nature contains only one character. Joris-Karl Huysmans (1848-1907) is now recognized as one of the most challenging and innovative figures in European literature and an acknowledged principal architect of the fin-de-siecle imagination. He was a career civil servant who wrote ten novels, most notably A Rebours and La-Bas.

The infamous inspiration for the novel which slowly corrupts Oscar Wilde's Dorian Grayis translated by Robert Baldick with an introduction by Patrick McGuinness in Penguin Classics. A wildly original fin-de-siècle novel, Against Nature contains only one character. Des Esseintes is a decadent, ailing aristocrat who retreats to an isolated villa where her indulges his taste for luxury and excess. Veering between nervous excitability and debilitating ennui, he gluts his aesthetic appetites with classical literature and art, exotic jewels (with which he fatally encrusts the shell of his tortoise), rich perfumes and a kaleidoscope of sensual experiences. Against Nature, in the words of the author, exploded 'like a meteorite' and has enjoyed a cult following to this day.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
Comments: (7)
Golkree
After reading "Submission" by Michel Houllebecq, where the main character's career revolves around J.K. Huysmans and "The Strange Death of Europe" by Douglas Murray, which mentions the book "Au Rebours" and the author's journey to salvation, I decided I should try reading the book itself. Upon finishing it, I can honestly say I've never really read anything like it in classical literature. For a book about nothing, as many claim, this book has a lot to say about, well, everything.

The book focuses on the life, or rather the lack thereof, of Des Esseinties. The main character is an older, somewhat wealthy gentlemen who is so fed up with his meaningless lifestyle that he goes into complete seclusion in the countryside. Hiding from the world in his house at Fontenay, Des Esseinties reflects upon his education, his personal relationships, his expectations and disappointments, and, most of all, his problems with both the Christian religion and the current state of materialistic French society. Des Esseinties spares no one in his disparaging revelries, but through it all is the sense that he is searching or missing something. His isolation, like everything else he's tried, inevitably fails him and his words in the final chapter are full of emotional despair for the things in life he cannot find, nor entirely understand.

I went into this book not really knowing what to expect. At its core, it's essentially a very long, albeit detailed and entertaining, whine. For that alone, this book has every reason to fail, and yet I found myself as unexpectedly fascinated by the insights of the main character as the French people did in 1884. Huysmans, through his character, spares no one and nothing from his mockery, finding only solace in his reading of books, mostly in the Latin tongue. The sheer amount of literature and historical figures covered in this book, if only briefly, is somewhat remarkable. Des Esseinties tries to keep himself entertained by French society and, when that fails, he turns to perfumes, artwork, travel and finally literature. All of these things provide him only temporary respite as he searches for a faith in something he can't describe. The overall picture painted is one of an unprincipled society drifting further and further into meaningless drivel to fill the void left behind by religion and community. In a sense, that description doesn't seem that much different from today.

I think what I enjoyed the most, however, was reading the letter by Huysman himself twenty year later. As critics from all sides lambasted this book, and him for writing such a wretched thing, one critic stood out to him by simply saying, "After such a book, it only remains for the author to choose between the muzzle of a pistol or the foot of the cross." Huysman made his choice in the end and found what he was searching for at long last. Perhaps true peace can only be found after knowing so much, yet understanding so little and finally being able to ask the right questions.

French authors seem to be excellent at creating biting commentary in worlds full of ennui. I got much, much more out of this novel than I was expecting, but I also understand why someone would not like this book. If you're interested in learning more about the disintegration of France, and really Europe as a whole, during this time period, then I would suggest picking this up and giving it a chance.
Cesar
Buyer beware -- this is easily the worst edition of a book I have ever seen. First: The incompetents who produced this book did not even bother to number the pages. Second: The pages are way too large for the small font. The blank space margins are huge. And the small font makes it very difficult to read. You will need a magnifying glass. Third: The jackasses who printed this did not even indent the paragraphs, despite the fact that indenting paragraphs is the normal publishing convention in English. All text is left-justified, exacerbating the difficulty in reading. Any 13 year-old with a basic word processing program could have printed a better product. "First Rate Publishers" produce junk. You will be disappointed.
roternow
Huysmans’ great A Rebour (perhaps better translated Against the Grain), is a mordantly brilliant plunge into the depths of modern decadence. With focused humor and sardonic sense of taste, Huysmans’s unfolds the story of Des Essaintes, the hermetic aristocrat on the borders of Paris, as he tries to seal himself in aesthetic rituals. Sliding vertiginously between the beautiful and divine, Against Nature is a brilliant defense of artifice and cultural alchemy.
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I'll assume that you already know about this book, or can get what you need from the other reviews. I'm just focusing on the edition: the 2004 Penguin Classics reprint of Robert Baldick's 1956 translation but with a new introduction and notes by Patrick McGuinness (and a new cover, of which more anon).

Now, I think of myself as a Huysmans 'completist,' and would have thought that I have a copy of just about every edition. But I've never seen this one in a bookstore (even here in NYC) and only came across it by accident on Amazon. As other reviewers have noted, the translation, though older, is much more readable than the Oxford Classics one. The latter has far more annotation, especially for the surveys of Latin and French "decadent" literature, but you really don't need that for more than your first reading. This is the edition to get if you plan to revisit the work from time to time, as I did (and do).

Why else? Well, the Oxford edtion is printed on cheap, thin paper that browned almost immediately, and produces irritating "see-through" effects; the cover, of my copy at least, instantly creased itself rather than folding, making it hard to hold (and ugly). This Penguin is on bright, white paper, and with larger type (though consequently is also a bit larger in size). Des Esseintes would approve!

But the main reasons are two: the intro, and the cover. McGuinness does a much better, or at least more interesting, job of relating the book to its time and ours, bringing in far more interesting tie-ins (Breton's "black 'umour" rather than "Huysmans's anality", Marianne Faithful saying she'd only bed guys who read the book, rather than Oxford's cringe-inducing comparison to Kurt Cobain(!)), though unlike Terry Hale in his introduction to the Penguin La Bas, he doesn't pick up on the fact that Huysmans' job at the "Interior Ministry" was actually comparable to our Dept. of Homeland Security rather than the traffic bureau.

But it was the cover that first led me to notice this on Amazon. It's a wonderful portrait by Franz Kupka (not Kafka!), "The Yellow Scale," which depicts an amazingly burnt out aesthetic type, wrapped up in a yellow robe, yellow book (of course) in one hand, and cigarette burning out in his other limp, yellow hand. Against the rest of the regulation black Penguin Classics cover, it's quite striking, and far more original than the old cover, Whistler's portrait of Montesquiou, or Oxford's Salome.

(While McGuinness's intro makes a good case for "Against the Grain" as a better title, beware of the Dover edtion under that name: it's old and expurgated, as is the illustrated one from the '30s). Buyer beware!)

In short, this is the one to get for the true Huysmaniac!
Water
Interesting in a historical context, but really describes a vapid dilatant with "perverse" interests. Not really interesting although I did learn a bit about color.
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