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eBook The King of the Fields epub

by Isaac Bashevis Singer

eBook The King of the Fields epub
  • ISBN: 0374529086
  • Author: Isaac Bashevis Singer
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Subcategory: World Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First edition (May 16, 2003)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1580 kb
  • FB2 size 1329 kb
  • Formats lrf doc azw rtf


Isaac Bashevis Singer was born in 1904 in a village near Warsaw, Poland, and grew up in the city’s Yiddish-speaking Jewish quarter. Although he initially considered becoming a rabbi like his father, Singer abandoned his religious studies in his twenties in favour of pursuing a career as a writer.

Isaac Bashevis Singer was born in 1904 in a village near Warsaw, Poland, and grew up in the city’s Yiddish-speaking Jewish quarter. In 1935, as the Nazi threat in neighbouring Germany grew increasingly ominous, Singer moved to the United States of America. He settled in New York, where he worked as a journalist for.

Isaac Bashevis Singer (Yiddish: יצחק באַשעװיס זינגער‎; November 21, 1902 – July 24, 1991) was a Polish-American writer in Yiddish, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978. The Polish form of his birth name was Icek Hersz Zynger

Isaac Bashevis Singer (Yiddish: יצחק באַשעװיס זינגער‎; November 21, 1902 – July 24, 1991) was a Polish-American writer in Yiddish, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978. The Polish form of his birth name was Icek Hersz Zynger. He used his mother's first name in an initial literary pseudonym, Izaak Baszewis, which he later expanded. He was a leading figure in the Yiddish literary movement, writing and publishing only in Yiddish. He was also awarded two .

True, Singer wrote 'The King of the Fields' when he was already 84 year . Isaac Bashevis Singer was a Polish American author of Jewish descent, noted for his short stories.

True, Singer wrote 'The King of the Fields' when he was already 84 year old which is remarkable, but was writing this novel necessary? I'd daresay no. This book is not written to be read literally - it is not about the formation of the Polish nation or culture. It borrows the Polish landscape as well as people and cultures out of their time in history and recompiles them to illustrate and investigate something about the nature of human life. He was one of the leading figures in the Yiddish literary movement, and received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978.

Born in 1902, Isaac Bashevis Singer grew up among fellow Jewish families in Poland. In response to the growing Nazi threat in neighbouring Germany, Singer emigrated to America. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978.

Isaac Bashevis Singer (Author).

Singer, Isaac Bashevis, 1904-1991. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Isaac Bashevis Singer, who won the Nobel Prize in 1978, is best-remembered for his humane and moving short stories . Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Isaac Bashevis Singer, who won the Nobel Prize in 1978, is best-remembered for his humane and moving short stories, which drew comparison with those of Maupassant and Chekhov. The forty-seven stories in this collection, selected by Singer himself out of nearly one hundred and fifty, range from the publication of his now-classic first collection, Gimpel the Fool, in 1957, until 1981.

A King of the Fields. vision and imagination are stronger than ever, and whether one reads the book as a parable of modern civilization and its discontents or as unadulterated fantasy, one is indelibly transfixed. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Singer's late novel, a magical and resonant fable, recreates the birth of the Polish nation

Singer's late novel, a magical and resonant fable, recreates the birth of the Polish nation. Teibele and her demon.

A fictional exploration of primitive history, Singer's novel portrays an age of superstition and violence in a country emerging from the darkness of savagery. Part parable of modern civilization, part fascinating historical novel, it reaffrims the author's reputation as a master storyteller.

Comments: (7)
Frlas
:(
I did not get this book... why do you think I've got it?
I don't know where can I notify you that I haven't got it? I want my money back!!!
Bliss
The King of the Fields is not the usual kind of tale we would expect from the 1978 Nobel Prize winning author for literature Isaac Bashevis Singer (1902-1991). This book, published in 1988, is one of the last books that he wrote. Generally, the protagonist of his books is a Jew living in recent times. This novel depicts life in a pre-historic period and the main character is a heathen, Cybula, who did not believe in the gods but was an unsophisticated pantheist.
The people in the novel are not only unsophisticated and uneducated, they are depicted as being far from bright. Most believed in the powers of demons and gods who aided or harmed them. Their world was filled with violence, theft, murders, rape, and sexual perversion. Cybula, for example, slept with a mother and daughter and had sex with both while both lay next to him.
Cybula was a leader of a tribe of hunters who were beaten in battle by warriors who lived off of foods grown from the ground.
There is a Jew in the story. A man who was captured and sold as a slave. Cybula brings him to his land where he piously teaches the people about Judaism; anachronistically not the Judaism of the prehistoric period of the novel, but of the much later talmudic period. What he teaches is impractical, such as teaching them how to read and write, but not the language of the time, but Hebrew, written from right to left rather than left to right as was written during Cybula’s lifetime. It is likely that Singer was using this minor character to mock Rabbinic Judaism.
The tale can, and I believe should, be read as a parable showing the inhumanity in modern times.
Rude
"The King of the Fields" is a little unusual for Singer. It is one of the last novels he wrote and maybe he decided to abandon his usual framework and try something different. The central character is not a Jew but is a heathen, Cybula. Nominally the period is some time around the century or so after Christs death which I think is much earlier period then any other of his novels ("The slave" is 17th century - I can't remember reading anything earlier). In the novel he imagines a primitive Polish tribe of hunters who are conquered by another group who force upon them a more agricultural way of life. This kind of dates it much further in the past. In fact its best to relate to the novel as a fable, a musing on various changes in human society and not to treat the events or contexts too literally..

After the hunter group are conquered their leader Cybula flees to the mountains while the leader of the conquering group, Krol Rudy, marries Cybula's daughter. Cybula eventually returns to his village and joins forces with Krol Rudy. Cybula is sent with another member of Krol Rudy's group, Nosek to a nearby town - this is the first time he has seen any community outside his own. They return from the town with a Jew and a slave girl. When they get back to the village Krol Rudy is gone mad and no longer functions as a leader. Cybula, who for most of the book is carrying on a fairly open sexual relationship with his best friends widow and her daughter (both of whom approve of this) eventually becomes the leader of this primitive community.The Jew becomes the villages teacher and all seems well but of course it doesn't last.There are plenty of developments in the story not to mention rape, incest, human sacrifice, matricide and lynches. All this makes the novel sound a bit heavier and depressing then it is. The story flows, there is much black humor and the characters are interesting and as with most Singer books once you start it you can't put it down till you finish it. So an interesting and entertaining novel worth your time and, as with everything else I have read by this author, recommended.
Gtonydne
Many years ago, when I was a teenager, I read Singer's Enemies, A Love Story. Today, I barely remember the plot or the characters. What I do recall is the sense of beauty and strength in the writing, how it evoked strong feelings and emotions. I have meant to go back and re-read that book. Now after reading The King of the Fields, I definitely will.

In this novel, a story about a small tribe in pre-industrial Poland, the Lesniks, and their leader Cybula, Singer manages to evoke a good number of universal human experiences, in particular disturbing thoughts. For example, Cybula deals with his desire to die rather than confront the problems of daily life, as well as his discomfort with seeing his own daughter nude. He seeks truth but is constantly confused about what is true or not. His tribe believes in many gods, but this belief is tested when it encounters a Jew and later a Christian bishop. Who should he believe? As far as he can tell, his own gods did not protect him or his tribe from misfortune and the new gods seems to come with their own burden of contradiction, rules and cruelty. This basic questioning of religious faith - to believe or not, of so what to believe, and if so, how to deal with the contradictions and inconsistencies? - is something that most people confront and deal with at some point. Cybula's default is his god of death, who seems to be the final arbiter who gives peace when someone dies.

The religious aspect is but one of many different perspectives upon which the novel touches. There are also the plusses and minuses of industrialization, including the challenges and meaning of giving up a former way of life. There is also a lot of substance to be found on the meaning of relationships between men and women. Singer presents this in a very crude and raw form, as they probably were in those pre-modern times, with women being completely subservient to man. At the same time, Singer shows how this power relationship can be easily inverted given the right circumstances.

This is a powerful novel that will resonate with the reader for a long time. Read it and enjoy the work of this Nobel laureate who has been called a master story teller.
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