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eBook Lucy : Growing up Human: A Chimpanzee Daughter in a Psychotherapist's Family epub

by Maurice K. Temerlin

eBook Lucy : Growing up Human: A Chimpanzee Daughter in a Psychotherapist's Family epub
  • ISBN: 0285622382
  • Author: Maurice K. Temerlin
  • Genre: Health
  • Subcategory: Psychology & Counseling
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SOUVENIR PRESS LTD (1976)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1685 kb
  • FB2 size 1185 kb
  • Formats docx rtf mbr txt


Temerlin, Maurice K. Publication date.

Temerlin, Maurice K. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

How Maurice Temerlin raised the animal brings ethics into question. He and his wife raised a chimp named Lucy (from the time the chimp was two days old) as if she were simply a member of their family, to see whether such an environment would encourage her to model "human" behavior. He states in the Preface to this 1975 book, "Removed from her mother shortly after birth, Lucy was taken into our home and raised as much as possible as though she were a human being. From birth to maturity she never saw another chimpanzee, so that she could learn whatever she learned only from human beings.

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Lucy (1964–1987) was a chimpanzee owned by the Institute for Primate Studies in Oklahoma, and raised by Maurice K. Temerlin, P. Temerlin and his wife raised Lucy as if she were a human child, teaching her to eat with silverware, dress herself, flip through magazines, and sit in a chair at the dinner table.

Maurice K. Temerlin Lucy: Growing Up Human : . .

ISBN 13: 9780831400453.

1976 ISBN 0-8314-0045-5. The Social Psychology of Clinical Diagnosis, University of Oklahoma, Dept. Some Hazards of the Therapeutic Relationship", Jane W. Temerlin, M. S. Maurice K. Temerlin, Ph. Cultic Studies Journal. Diagnostic Bias in Community Mental Health, Community.

Maury, like many caretakers of primates, insists on calling Lucy his daughter. Most of such quasi-parents keep their charges in cages and use cattle prods or other devices to keep them in line.

Library descriptions. No library descriptions found.

Lucy's incredibly human-like behavior is described as well as her family relationships, sexual development, and participation in encounter group sessions
Comments: (7)
Hilarious Kangaroo
Temerlin's story of raising a chimp as though a human is intrinsically fascinating. But his perverse insistence that she IS human also makes the book fascinatingly grotesque. Of course, whether humans differ from primates in kind or only in degree is a reasonable question. Temerlin's story should be a contribution to this issue. However, his highly subjective judgments on humans cast doubt on his judgments of Lucy, the chimp-daughter.
Uylo
Common sense and common decency were thrown out the window when the author took a chimpanzee into his home to raise. How Maurice Temerlin raised the animal brings ethics into question.
Modifyn
Maurice K. Temerlin (1924-1988) was a psychologist and author. He and his wife raised a chimp named Lucy (from the time the chimp was two days old) as if she were simply a member of their family, to see whether such an environment would encourage her to model "human" behavior. He states in the Preface to this 1975 book, "Removed from her mother shortly after birth, Lucy was taken into our home and raised as much as possible as though she were a human being. From birth to maturity she never saw another chimpanzee, so that she could learn whatever she learned only from human beings." The Temerlin's son Steve was to treat Lucy simply as a "sibling."

What were the results? When asked about Lucy's intelligence, Temerlin once replied, "she's mentally retarded in the classroom and brighter than Einstein in the woods." Lucy DID, however, learn to correctly use a number of tools (e.g., spoon, knife, fork, etc.). Lucy never was toilet-trained, but Temerlin notes, "In some ways Lucy is an ideal drinking companion. She is appreciative, always making sounds of great delight when offered a drink."

At age 5, Lucy was taught American Sign Language. Temerlin comments, "Learning ASL has enriched her life. It gave her the power to ask questions about her environment... Since she acquired her ASL signs she does the same things, but she now asks 'What's that?' Interestingly, she has never asked 'why?'"

Temerlin notes at the end of the book, "We have suppressed Lucy far more than chimpanzees in nature would be suppressed... In no way has she become neurotic. In my opinion she did not become neurotic ... because she never experienced a deficit in social contact while growing up."

The book concludes on the note, "The story of Lucy Temerlin is not finished... it is very complicated, for we want to live normal lives now, though we are still very committed to Lucy. All I can definitely say at the moment is that part of the earnings from this book will be used to establish a trust fund for Lucy, to provide for her care and comfort throughout her life."

For some similar earlier experiments, see Toto and I: A gorilla in the family,The ape in our house and The ape and the child;: A study of environmental influence upon early behavior,.
Mora
"Lucy" was a chimpanzee raised as a human child. She learned to eat with silverware, dress herself, read magazines, sit in a chair, drink wine, and eventually she learned some ASL from Roger Fouts.
Some other things she did not learn: toilet training, temper management, appropriate behavior around strangers.... Though raised as a human, many of her behaviors were still "wild animal."
The Temerlins were either unbelievably tolerant or incredibly undisciplined (depending on your viewpoint). They allowed Lucy to run roughshod over their lives, destroy their home and frighten their guests. Maurice is a psychotherapist and his book is filled with elaborate rationalizations and psycho-babble to avoid facing this truth. It is sometimes unintentionally hilarious as Temerlin explains his guests psychological failings because they are horrified at having a chimp defecate in their lap.
Unfortunately, the book ends in 1975. After this time, according ! to Roger Fouts's 1997 "Next of Kin," Lucy was sent to Africa to be "re-integrated" into the wild she had never known. After several years of extreme hardship and adjustment difficulties, she was eventually shot and killed by a hunter, who took her hide, hands and feet as trophies.
But that would make another book.
monotronik
This book is a tremendous reminder that what separates man from animals is a difference in degree, not kind. That humans can use language, feel emotions, play, kiss, make tea, enjoy some gin, or even masturbate to porn is not unique to our species. Indeed, these behaviors were repeatedly performed by Lucy Temerlin--a chimpanzee. One might claim that Lucy the chimp would never have learned to use language or make tea without having been taught. But honestly ask yourself: do you think you could use language without being taught? Do you think you could make tea without having learned the process of filling the kettle with water, heating the water, and inserting the teabag? Certainly there are mental abilities that are restricted to human brains, but you'll be surprised to read what a nonhuman can do.

I must warn the potential reader that the book has been written by a psychotherapist that speaks of repressed hostility, oedipal complexes, and other psychological analyses that sometimes seem fantastical. In addition, the content may be too graphic for young readers and those whose favorite book is the new testament. But, if you're down for a chimp defecating half in the toilet and half in the living-room, masturbating to and peeing on playgirl magazines, and poking strangers' large breasts, then this is a book for you!

HAHA, but seriously--this is an enlightening book.
Ahieones
I first heard about this book when I had to read "Next of Kin" by Roger Fouts for my Ape Language studies course. I heard about it again in Goodall's "Through a Window". Finally, I just had to order a copy and I was NOT disappointed. This book has everything: cross-fostering, psychotherapy, sexual taboos. Temerlin holds nothing back. And it all took place in the sixties/early seventies, which makes the story so much cooler. This book made me want to meet Maurice Temerlin and have a cup of coffee with him. Highly recommended to anyone who is interested in apes or psychoanalysis.
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