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eBook The Private Life of the Brain (Penguin Press Science) epub

by Susan Greenfield

eBook The Private Life of the Brain (Penguin Press Science) epub
  • ISBN: 0141007206
  • Author: Susan Greenfield
  • Genre: Health
  • Subcategory: Psychology & Counseling
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books, Limited (UK); Reprint edition (February 28, 2002)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1961 kb
  • FB2 size 1766 kb
  • Formats docx lrf mobi rtf


Oxford neuroscientist Susan Greenfield peers inside the dimly lit skull to show us what she thinks is going on in The Private Life of the Brain.

Oxford neuroscientist Susan Greenfield peers inside the dimly lit skull to show us what she thinks is going on in The Private Life of the Brain. She presents the basics of contemporary thought on consciousness as they relate to her own theory, which involves a continuum of experience between sensual, emotional grounding in the surrounding world and rational, cognitive withdrawal into mental life.

Penguin Adult, 28 февр. Challenging many preconceived notions, Susan Greenfield's groundbreaking book seeks to answer one of science's most enduring mysteries: how our unique sense of self is created. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. What is happening in the brain when we drink too much alcohol, get high on ecstasy or experience road rage? Emotion, says internationally acclaimed neuroscientist Susan Greenfield, is the building block of consciousness. THE PRIVATE LIFE OF THE BRAIN: Emotions, Consciousness, and the Secret of the Self. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

Start by marking The Private Life of the Brain (Penguin Press Science) as Want to Read . In this groundbreaking exploration, neuroscientist and author Susan Greenfield demystifies the private life of the brain.

Start by marking The Private Life of the Brain (Penguin Press Science) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Susan Adele Greenfield, Baroness Greenfield, CBE, FRCP (born 1 October 1950) is an English scientist, writer, broadcaster, and member of the House of Lords. The Private Life of the Brain (Penguin Press Science). London, UK: Penguin Books Ltd. pp. 272 pages. Greenfield, Susan (2003).

Challenging many preconceived notions, Susan Greenfield's groundbreaking book seeks to answer one of science's most enduring mysteries: how our unique sense of self is. .More from this Author. A Day in the Life of the Brain.

Challenging many preconceived notions, Susan Greenfield's groundbreaking book seeks to answer one of science's most enduring mysteries: how our unique sense of self is created.

New York : John Wiley & Sons.

Susan Greenfield is a leading neuroscientist based at the Laboratory of Pharmacology, Oxford. In 1994 she was the first woman to give the annual Royal Institution Christmas Lectures. She is the presenter for BBC2's Brain Story. Country of Publication. The World, Ideas, Culture": General Interest.

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What is happening in the brain when we drink too much alcohol, get high on ecstasy or experience road rage? Emotion, says internationally acclaimed neuroscientist Susan Greenfield, is the building block of consciousness. As our minds develop we create a personalized inner world based on our experiences. But during periods of intense emotion, such as anger, fear or euphoria, we can literally lose our mind, returning to the mental state we experienced as infants. Challenging many preconceived notions, Susan Greenfield's groundbreaking book seeks to answer one of science's most enduring mysteries: how our unique sense of self is created.
Comments: (7)
Blackseeker
The book is fourteen years old and still a great read. Written with humor and compassion. No science training needed to read the text and contemplate one's own mind.
Bookcovers on my hardcover and paperback editions (one was a gift) better than bland blue on Amazon site.
Skillet
Interesting read.
Uris
This is a beautiful marriage of the physicality of emotion and the psychological aspect. Greenfield explores theories of consciousness from a neurological background while also examining the subjective workings. Different perspectives are presented including depression, schizophrenia and drug use - the mind's workings in different states.
Der Bat
Not written in interesting way
Insanity
Susan Greenfield wrote a wonderful and easy for us laymen to understand book. I recommend this for anyone interested in what makes us tick.
Dianaghma
An author which imparts the information in a way one does not feel out of their depth, it provided me with how complex the human brain is.
Rainpick
Susan Adele Greenfield (born 1950) is a British scientist, Professor of Synaptic Pharmacology at Lincoln College, Oxford, and member of the House of Lords. She has also written other books such as Journey to the Centers of the Mind.

She wrote in the Preface to this 2000 book, "This book initially started life as a neuroscientist's exploration of pleasure... The human condition seems to entail an uneasy vying between times of abandonment when we 'let ourselves go' and other times... when we are 'developing' or 'broadening' our minds... The more I tried to translate into brain terms this dichotomy... the more I realized that it did not apply to pleasure alone, but to a far wider range of basic emotions. Hence the quest... widened into a consideration of all emotions, both how the brain can accomodate their diversity, as well as whether there might be a common basic factor that distinguishes an emotion, in general, as such. My 'solution,' as you will see, is that emotions and the mind are not polar opposites, but rather the ends of a continuum." (Pg. ix)

She suggests, "I have tried to show that consciousness should be viewed as a means for coordination and communication between brain and body, more specifically as a way of unifying the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems." (Pg. 183)

She concludes, "Finally, we come to the basic idea that emotions are an abrogation of the Self. The more I wrote of this book, the more I found it impossible to distinguish MIND from the concept of SELF. After all, if MIND is the personalization of the brain, then what more, or what less, could SELF actually be? I'll stick my neck out and say that as far as I'm concerned, the two terms might as well be synonymous. For virtually all animals save humans, and for infant humans, the underdeveloped mind would entail a lack of self-consciousness. Consciousness will blossom into self-consciousness only when enough associations are in place to be able to provide a common referent to myriad experiences, like a hub on a wheel." (Pg. 185-186)

This book will be of more interest to those interested in cognitive neuroscience, than to those only interested in the philosophy of mind.
This is excellent science writing. Many complex ideas are made understandable through clear analogies, while clearly pointing out the limitations of those analogies.
The author tries to describe how brain states relate to states of experience; by finding common ground between many extreme experiences. Her elegant (if not original) thesis is that patterns of connectivity between massive numbers of neurons determine our overall state of consciousness. States vary, according to this theory, by how large the interconnected clusters of neurons are, and how rapidly they turnover from one cluster to another. Neuroses and depression reflect a kind of stuckness in wide scale static networks of associations. States of intense sensation all involve "losing our mind" in the sense of dismantling these widespread networks and replacing them with many small networks that rapidly switch from one to another, keeping us trapped in the here and now.
We peer into the life of drug addicts, the fearful, the schizophrenic, and small children, to find some remarkable similarities in their experience. Then we see how the experience is so different for the depressed and those in pain. By comparing these extremes, and comparing the extremes to the way we normally feel, the authors' thesis begins to come to life.
This is a fascinating attempt at a framework for relating brain states and states of consciousness that has a lot of potential, but is clearly still a skeleton. It does, however, make a number of testable predictions discussed in the final chapters, which distinguish this book still further from the usual speculations about how the brain produces conscious experience.
On the other hand, in some ways, there is more missing than presented here. The theory of neural connectivity is very vague and makes no inroads to explaining just why a complex neural network should produce a mind. The implication is almost that arbitrary complexity should suffice, but this clearly isn't the case. Sensory networks seem to possess qualities of experience, while motor networks do not. There is something more in the networks that give rise to higher mental qualities than just complexity itself, and the author is very vague in this critical area.
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