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eBook Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya epub

by Caroline Elkins

eBook Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya epub
  • ISBN: 0805076530
  • Author: Caroline Elkins
  • Genre: History
  • Subcategory: Africa
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; First Edition edition (January 11, 2005)
  • Pages: 496 pages
  • ePUB size: 1920 kb
  • FB2 size 1589 kb
  • Formats mobi doc txt lrf


For decades Western imperialists have waged wars and destroyed local populations in the name of civilization and democracy.

For decades Western imperialists have waged wars and destroyed local populations in the name of civilization and democracy. From 1952 to 1960, after a violent uprising by native Kenyans, the British detained and brutalized hundreds of thousands of Kikuyu-the colony's largest ethnic group-who had demanded their independence.

Электронная книга "Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya", Caroline Elkins. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Britain's Gulag : The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya by Caroline Elkins (2005-05-04). Peter Baxter was born in Kenya, now lives in the US, and writes extensively of African history, especially the wars of liberation 1950 - 1980. Mass Market Paperback. But, reading this at the same time as reading "Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya" by Caroline Elkins, a Harvard Graduate Student, the difference in the sides of the story told is amazing.

Never wish them pain. That's not who you are. If they caused you pain, they must have pain inside.

Imperial Reckoning book. Britain's gulag in Kenya was a systematic extermination process undertaken with the lessons of the Shoah at hand- meaning, they Imperial Reckoning is a brick-by-brick wall of history created to be a record, a tool, evidence, where the original record was packed away, rewritten, denied, burned, tortured into silence or murdered.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The compelling story of the system of prisons and work camps where thousands met their deaths has remained largely untold-the victim of a determined effort by the British to destroy all official records of their attempts to stop the Mau Mau uprising, the Kikuyu people's ultimately successful bid for Kenyan independence.

January 22, 2005, Caroline Elkins' book Imperial Reckoning exposes a grim period in recent British history. From Imperial Reckoning: "The colonial propaganda machine, once well-oiled, preyed on the detainees' doubts and fears

January 22, 2005, Caroline Elkins' book Imperial Reckoning exposes a grim period in recent British history. In the 1950s, British authorities in Kenya imprisoned thousands of Kikuyu people who were fighting to end colonial rule. Elkins talks with Jennifer Ludden. Author Details Harsh British Rule in Kenya. From Imperial Reckoning: "The colonial propaganda machine, once well-oiled, preyed on the detainees' doubts and fears. Pamphlets in the vernacular, pointing out how misguided was the detainees' belief that African land had been stolen by the British, were circulated throughout the compound.

Caroline Elkins, an assistant professor of history at Harvard University, spent a decade in London, Nairobi, and the . A major work of history that for the first time reveals the violence and terror at the heart of Britain's civilizing mission in Kenya.

Caroline Elkins, an assistant professor of history at Harvard University, spent a decade in London, Nairobi, and the Kenyan countryside interviewing hundreds of Kikuyu men and women who survived the British camps, as well as the British and African loyalists who detained them. As part of the Allied forces, thousands of Kenyans fought alongside the British in World War II.

A major work of history that for the first time reveals the violence and terror at the heart of Britain's civilizing mission in KenyaAs part of the Allied forces, thousands of Kenyans fought alongside the British in World War II. But just a few years after the defeat of Hitler, the British colonial government detained nearly the entire population of Kenya's largest ethnic minority, the Kikuyu-some one and a half million people.The compelling story of the system of prisons and work camps where thousands met their deaths has remained largely untold-the victim of a determined effort by the British to destroy all official records of their attempts to stop the Mau Mau uprising, the Kikuyu people's ultimately successful bid for Kenyan independence. Caroline Elkins, an assistant professor of history at Harvard University, spent a decade in London, Nairobi, and the Kenyan countryside interviewing hundreds of Kikuyu men and women who survived the British camps, as well as the British and African loyalists who detained them. The result is an unforgettable account of the unraveling of the British colonial empire in Kenya-a pivotal moment in twentieth- century history with chilling parallels to America's own imperial project. Imperial Reckoning is the winner of the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction.
Comments: (7)
Thoginn
Review -Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya

"Mau Mau: The Kenyan Emergency" by Peter Baxter is a very clean, very nice and respectable report on the official actions of the British governmental officials during the years 1950 - 1060. The detail of the official actions of the government are well laid out. The names and personalities of the Kenyan governors and others in power are nicely laid out. Peter Baxter was born in Kenya, now lives in the US, and writes extensively of African history, especially the wars of liberation 1950 - 1980.

But, reading this at the same time as reading "Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya" by Caroline Elkins, a Harvard Graduate Student, the difference in the sides of the story told is amazing. Baxter briefly mentions brutality and mental illness, and how the majority of the deaths were in his account black on black. Baxter mentions the pipeline of detainees and forced labor but does not delve into the horrors of these camps like Elkins does. Baxter makes brief reference to the racism and immorality of the white settlers. Elkins remarks on a Nairobi social club frequently visited by the settlers in which on entrance the members were obliged by their own rules to switch partners and rooms were provided for "entertainment." The screenings of all blacks in Nairobi for Mau Mau sympathy and aid, Operation Anvil, is mentioned in both books. Baxter merely states the men and many women were taken to detainee camps outside the city. Elkins talks of beatings, torture, castration, starvation, exposure to elements and other mistreatment of the blacks taken off the street on the merest whiff of evidence, suspicion, or retaliation that occurred in those detention camps.

I also have read Peter Hewitt's personal memoirs "Kenya Cowboy" of his time in the Kenyan Police Force during this same period. Hewitt's account is a retelling of his personal experiences and not of the other problems about in Kenyan at that time. But Baxter quotes Hewitt at length in support of his outlining of the official government actions. Hewitt's account also testifies to the physical state of the Mau Mau after 1955, which was horrible. Hewitt's account is very personal as to his actions and experiences. Hewitt entered Kenya a few short months after the Ruck Massacre, and about the same time as the Lari Massacre. Hewitt does not go into the pipeline or other aspects of the Emergency.

The legends in history classes that adhere to the Mau Mau "emergency" are of vague "horrible deeds" done by 1) the Mau Mau, 2) the British officials and army and 3) the loyalists Kikuyu. While Elkins writes with all the indignation of a person who finds her heroes have clay feet, Baxter writes to justify and minimize the episodes of the actual history. I suspect the truth is somewhere in the middle. Both Baxter and Elkins mention the plethora of books on the wars of African Liberation and how they vary in content. Thus one has to consider the violence and virulence of the period and how both sides and the later researchers are all still pushing their points of view. Baxter's book is a good outline of the official actions of the British. Elkins book is researched among the Kikuyu people and well reflects their recollections and oral traditions. Aside from the similarity of the names of people and places and dates, one would not think one was reading of the same people, place and period.
Fordrellador
This was one of the hardest book that I ever read, even though it was well written and interesting. I persisted since I was going to lead Healing from War and Genocide workshops in Nigeria and Kenya in May 2017 for Black Africans from about 17 different countries. The book provided me with very valuable information about the history of Kenya.
The history was very disturbing to read. After all this happened after the Nazi genocide of the Jews of Europe and was committed by the British government with the knowledge and collusion of the leaders of the Conservative party. The stories of murder, rape, and torture, and forced evacuation of their homes and villages, were confirmed when I listened to the stories of about a dozen elders [men and women ages 80 to 106] while I was in Kenya.
I do have one complaint about the book. Professor Elkins only uses the word "genocide" once to describe the British actions in Kenya. I wrote to her asking why, but did not receive an answer. From my perspective what Elkins describes fits the definition of genocide from the U.N.: killing members of the group; causing them serious bodily or mental harm; deliberately inflicting on them conditions calculated to bring about the group’s physical destruction; imposing measures to prevent births within the group; forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. (adapted from the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 9, 1948).
Read the book and you can decide.
Via
I grew up in Kenya in Kikuyu and I always heard stories from my grandmother and great grandmother how horrible the British were, but I was young and had no idea how bad it was for our grandparents who survived the colonial period. I wept for my grandparents when I read this book, its unimaginable how cruel and sadistic the British colonial masters were. What's even more sad is that some of the same cruel colonialists still live in Kenya today since not all the settlers moved away after independence. The majority of settlers moved to Rhodesia and South Africa after independence but a large number of them remained and still occupy vast tracts of prime land in a free, independent and democratic Kenya to this date. There is no statute of limitations for murder and I hope that in the near future we will be able to track down any settler still living in Kenya who is guilty of murder and torture of Africans and make them pay for their past sins. I for one don't think they should be living a life of luxury in Kenya when they have the blood of so many on their hands. I intend to use my meager resources to find them, expose them and hope that one day they face justice.
Xaluenk
The book, while highlighting a tragic chapter in the history of the Kenyan people as well as the horrific consequences of a paternalistic British colonialism, feels long. This book presents fact after fact connected to the brutal colonial policy of the British in Kenya. I can't think of one example of "benevolent colonialism" and how the British ruled in Kenya will make you sick. How the British could on one hand demonize the Nazi camps in WW2 yet turn around and brutally treat the Kenyan people is mind boggling. While the Mau Mau movement certainly acted in brutal ways at times, it's hard to know what really came first... Mau Mau brutality or British brutality.

That said, the book feels a bit long. Imagine trying to hold your breath underwater for a long period of time. At some point you have to come up to breathe. When fact after fact of brutality is recollected it seems like it has no end. At many points I had to put the book down because it was just too much. The research done seems top notch but the point was made by chapter 3 or 4.

I read this book in preparation for a trip to Kenya this summer. It does give me some modern day historical background that will help in relating to the Kenyan people.
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